German Shepherds Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Ill be getting a male gsd in July and I dont know what to look for in a german shepherd puppy im super excited and I have second pick of the litter. I just want to be prepared for everything and know whats good and whats not and know what im looking for in a german shepherd puppy I have never owned this breed before and have always heard very good things about them so im finally buying one!

Thanks for the answers and all the help!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,323 Posts
Your breeder should be picking the pup for you based on your lifestyle, goals with the dog, and personality. They've spent eight weeks with the pup, they know them well! It takes a big load off. If the breeder is not picking for you, confident and curious is always good to look for.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,460 Posts
it depends upon what you are looking for in a dog. I'm guessing that you are looking for a companion so correct me if I am wrong.
What you do not want is the shrinking violet or the alpha puppy in the litter. The shrinking violet might develop fear characteristics and might be difficult to train. The alpha might turn out to be more dog than you can handle and will end up being the leader of your pack.
Look for the puppy that is friendly and has no issues about coming up to meet you. Stay away from the puppy that needs encouragement to even approach you.
Assuming your breeder is not an amateur he/she should be able to advise you with choices.
Sorry for the rather casual response - I'm sure you get the idea.
Good Luck!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,460 Posts
PS there are many breeders that let their puppies go to their new home at 8 weeks; some even at 6 weeks. IMHO 10 weeks is the perfect time for your new puppy to come home with you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,084 Posts
Why do you feel 10 weeks is the best time?

6-12 weeks is the crucial learning period for all puppies. I prefer them spend that time with me learning my lifestyle and training. I would never purchase a pup I couldnt take home at 8 weeks. I feel at that time there is very little they could be learning from their litter. Except that dominant pups can get their way by bullying, submissive pups can hide from everything scary, and mother is just plain sick of them at that point.

I know more than a few breeders that separate pups at 5-6 weeks because in their experience (I'm talking DECADES of breeding) it makes more stable pups.

Sent from Petguide.com Free App
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
27,460 Posts
If we go to a 'responsible' breeder to get a healthy pup with good temperament (click this ---> http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum/welcome-gsd-faqs-first-time-owner/162231-how-find-puppy.html ) they tend to NOT send just let us in with the entire litter to choose willy nilly :)

I know my breeder spends weeks testing and observing the entire litter. Tons of time on the phone discussing my background, experience and expectations for one of their puppies. Then, either picks out the one or may 2 that they know will be the best match.

I know this is another reason I pay all that money for a great breeder. THEIR experience and background with the breed in general and their puppies in particular. Frankly, pretty much all puppies are just ADORABLE and I'd either accidentally pick out Killer/Fang or Slug/Couch Potato if left on my own. Which wouldn't be the best fit for me ! :)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
79 Posts
Visit them at 7 weeks and line them up. Throw a ball and watch who get's it first and who retrieves. Having a dog with ball drive is so much fun!!!

See if the breeder will let the mother out to play with the dogs. Watch the interaction. Really neat to see them get knocked down in turn and chase the mother around.

Play with dogs individually. Watch interaction.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
79 Posts
Why do you feel 10 weeks is the best time?

6-12 weeks is the crucial learning period for all puppies. I prefer them spend that time with me learning my lifestyle and training. I would never purchase a pup I couldnt take home at 8 weeks.
Couldn't agree more!!! 8 weeks is a great time to take them home. In fact I rather take a pup home at just over 7 weeks than at 10 weeks. But that is just me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
it depends upon what you are looking for in a dog. I'm guessing that you are looking for a companion so correct me if I am wrong.
What you do not want is the shrinking violet or the alpha puppy in the litter. The shrinking violet might develop fear characteristics and might be difficult to train. The alpha might turn out to be more dog than you can handle and will end up being the leader of your pack.
Look for the puppy that is friendly and has no issues about coming up to meet you. Stay away from the puppy that needs encouragement to even approach you.
Assuming your breeder is not an amateur he/she should be able to advise you with choices.
Sorry for the rather casual response - I'm sure you get the idea.
Good Luck!!


Yeah thats exactly what im looking for! Thanks so much for the reply :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,460 Posts
Maybe I was a bit too casual with my response but I have to tell you that it is soooo difficult to cover everything without creating a mile long document. That's why you need to consider everyone's comments.
MaggieroseLee (as usual) has pointed out important aspects regarding puppy choices. As a breeder you should know every litter like a book - if you don't you shouldn't be breeding. A responsible breeder would never let a puppy go to someone unless they had made multiple visits to the breeder. You should be able to meet and interact with the parents (or at the very least the mother).
Finally before the puppies go to their new home they need to have the opportunity to learn from their mother and siblings. This is crucial! The whole learning experience really sinks in from 8 to 10 weeks. This time period teaches them manners, restraint, and socialization. Here's something else for you to think about when considering this particular subject. Let's imagine a litter of 9 puppies. Do you think that there just might be a difference in the cost of puppy care when comparing six weeks to ten weeks?!:):)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,084 Posts
In many states its illegal to separate a litter before 8 weeks.
In 17 (of the 50) states it's illegal to SELL a puppy before 8 weeks. In 1 states it's illegal to sell a puppy before 7 weeks. 32 states have no age laws. In 0 states is it illegal to separate littermates from eachother.

Im just stating the experience of numerous breeders I've talked to. And their opinion makes sense to me. More stable, uniform puppies across the board that learn proper human manners from very good training and handling.

Im not saying puppies should be SOLD at 5-6 weeks. But in the home of a very good breeder I think puppies separated and trained at a young age would do great

Sent from Petguide.com Free App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Pick of the litter

We are trying to choose our puppy & just found out that one of the choices has a kink in the tail. Vet says, probably happened en utero. We don't plan to show the dog but will explore K9 activities requiring training. My question/problem; this dog was kind of my favorite and now I'm not so sure! I have first pick of the litter, 3 choices really because I want female. I really like the other two females and all three have very similar temperaments. I think I'm struggling with the, "Why pick a defective dog when you have 1st choice and are paying a lot of money"? Its not really a defect unless I want to show or breed, neither of which I'm interested in. Its a very small kink near the end of the tail and its difficult to predict how noticeable this will end up being once the dog is mature. Please help!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,941 Posts
We are trying to choose our puppy & just found out that one of the choices has a kink in the tail. Vet says, probably happened en utero. We don't plan to show the dog but will explore K9 activities requiring training. My question/problem; this dog was kind of my favorite and now I'm not so sure! I have first pick of the litter, 3 choices really because I want female. I really like the other two females and all three have very similar temperaments. I think I'm struggling with the, "Why pick a defective dog when you have 1st choice and are paying a lot of money"? Its not really a defect unless I want to show or breed, neither of which I'm interested in. Its a very small kink near the end of the tail and its difficult to predict how noticeable this will end up being once the dog is mature. Please help!
Hi, and welcome to the forum.

If I were you, I'd take the pup you feel is the best fit for you and your plans. The kink in the tail is a minor cosmetic issue. If the vet feels the pup damaged her tail in utero, then it isn't even a genetic issue and should not affect her quality in any way. As she matures and her adult coat comes in full, the kink may not even be noticeable.

Best advice is to choose your puppy on temperament and personality, and not on appearance. And as you said, you are not looking for a show or breeding prospect, so the kink in the tail should not matter.

If you are looking for a performace dog, then look for one that is confident, outgoing, friendly, curious, and wanting to engage with people.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
32,546 Posts
Best advice is to choose your puppy on temperament and personality, and not on appearance. And as you said, you are not looking for a show or breeding prospect, so the kink in the tail should not matter.

If you are looking for a performace dog, then look for one that is confident, outgoing, friendly, curious, and wanting to engage with people.
I agree, with something that minor it would not deter me from getting that puppy if it was the best choice based on my requirements and preferences.

Keefer carries his tail a bit curved to the side rather than perfectly straight, possibly because it's so long. He's a longcoat, and between the length of his tail and the long fur, it would drag on the ground if he didn't. It was suggested to me to keep the fur at the tip trimmed when he was younger so he wouldn't get used to holding it like that, but I never really cared. A curved tail might cost a dog points in the show ring, but it doesn't affect him in the slightest since he's a companion dog.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top