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Discussion Starter #1
What percentage of protein is recommended for adult GSDs, for pups, for elderly dogs?

Where is the website that shows the dog food standards?
 

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Discussion Starter #2
to answer one of my own questions.....the AAFCO sets the standards for dog food and regulates the manufacture and distribution of foods.

now, to find the proper amount of protein for my dogs.
 

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I found this white paper very interesting and researched the issue extensively so Jesse has been on Orijen since he was 6 months old - which has high and good kind of proteins. Jesse bloodwork was checked prior to going on it and after being on it for 2 months and his kidney and liver numbers got better (they were good before) which shocked our vet. He is doing amazing on this food and loves it's taste as well.

http://www.championpetfoods.com/orijen/documents/ORIJEN_White_paper.pdf

Hope this helps you and it is only my 2 cents.
 

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It frightens me that you seem to know less about feeding dogs than I do and you're breeding.
 

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My breeder claims that anywhere between 24% and 28% should be right for normal, adult GSD's. I fed adult food to my GS when she was a pup and she did just fine. I feed a food with 25% protein and she is doing great. I am not sure how much a senior dog should get. I would imagine considerably less.
 

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The fable about high protein issues has been debunked by research. Dogs do well on high protein. See the below

http://www.thepetcenter.com/imtop/protein.html

http://www.pets.ca/forum/showthread.php?t=48372

As well there is or was a dog nutritionist here on forums (forget name) but pointed me to all the research (which I don't have bookmarked) which sold me on the high protein route. And also seeing the blood work numbers made me and my vet a believer. Jesse is healthy has an ox, building good muscles in his legs, has no lameness or issues in any way.

Just my 2 cents again.
 

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It is incorrect that older dogs need less protein. And it all depends on the type of protein and the ratio with the other ingredients. It's not a one size fits all thing.

My senior is on a diet with 42% protein, 14% fat and 18% carbs (Orijen senior). She's doing great. In fact, she's done better on the higher protein, grain free foods than she did on the lower protein foods with grains.
 

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My experience is that seniors should stay on high protein diets (barring some specific veterinary reason to drop the protein intake). There is no reason to drop their protein levels simply because they get older. I run urine and bloodwork on my senior every six months (as I did my senior before her). Her levels remain right smack in the middle of normal. And they're consistent.

I think the idea that protein should be low for seniors is an idea whose time has passed (or SHOULD have passed by now).
 

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I credit part of my senior's longevity (over 15 years old) to EVO. She loves the food and and looks much younger than mid teens!

It is a high protein, no grain food, also (for the OP.)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
well, lets see....the puppy food I have here is 28% protein, 12% fat. The adult performance food is 30% protein, 20% fat, and the adult active dog is 27% protein, 18% fat.

I think I read online somewhere the ideal percentage of protein for adults is 24 to 28 percent. However, it might just have been someone's opinion.
 

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Originally Posted By: SherushThe fable about high protein issues has been debunked by research. Dogs do well on high protein. See the below

http://www.thepetcenter.com/imtop/protein.html

http://www.pets.ca/forum/showthread.php?t=48372

As well there is or was a dog nutritionist here on forums (forget name) but pointed me to all the research (which I don't have bookmarked) which sold me on the high protein route. And also seeing the blood work numbers made me and my vet a believer. Jesse is healthy has an ox, building good muscles in his legs, has no lameness or issues in any way.

Just my 2 cents again.
Why do they make any low protein food for senior dogs? Why would my dogs do so well on a 24% protein food and not very well on a 42% protein food? Isn't the amount of protein relevant to the amount of activity a dog has? It is not as black and white as "high protein=good, grain free=good, no corn=good".
 

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Actually, current studies show that older dogs may need more protein and not less. Although their activity level is often lower their bodies need more energy to move around then when they were younger. In other words, it takes more effort to do the same things.

And older dogs benefit from a grain free diet because grains cause inflammation and most older dogs either have or are at risk for arthritis.

Here is a very informative article published in Whole Dog Journal on feeding older dogs: http://www.dogaware.com/seniordiets.html
 

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Thanks for posting that link, BowWowMeow. Informative and from fairly reliable sources.
 

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I think that protein amounts also mean different things, depending on what you are feeding. In, say, Beneful, the amount of protein probably comes from a very low quality source and mostly grains. That will be different than the protein in these higher meat foods, which again is different from protein in a homeprepared diet. So the "amounts" may be the same, but because of the quality, you are looking at very different things.
 
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