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lol Right? I was just thinking how people make these puppies out to be monsters that require someone at home to exercise them all day long. Both my dogs are high drive sport dogs. I never needed to do that. If people really need to exercise their dogs several hours a day, either they have a monster of their own making by not teaching the dog to settle or the dog genetically is not balanced and has no off switch.
I call Shadow my little genetic nightmare. She carried the Energizer Bunny thing to a whole new level! She would literally terrorize until she collapsed. One wee tiny puppy that was powered by a tornado! It was her mission in life to sink razor sharp puppy teeth into every thing that twitched in her presence.
Judicious use of crating and structured play got us through those months. I set a schedule and made her abide by it. I worked her little brain and focused on shaping appropriate behavior. I never ran her for miles, I couldn't. She has a bad heart. The crate helped teach her to have the off switch that nature forgot to install.
Puppies that are even close to properly bred should not be difficult. A person just needs common sense.
 

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I call Shadow my little genetic nightmare. She carried the Energizer Bunny thing to a whole new level! She would literally terrorize until she collapsed. One wee tiny puppy that was powered by a tornado! It was her mission in life to sink razor sharp puppy teeth into every thing that twitched in her presence.
Judicious use of crating and structured play got us through those months. I set a schedule and made her abide by it. I worked her little brain and focused on shaping appropriate behavior. I never ran her for miles, I couldn't. She has a bad heart. The crate helped teach her to have the off switch that nature forgot to install.
Puppies that are even close to properly bred should not be difficult. A person just needs common sense.
this was my guy. An absolute ball Of energy till this day. I mean this guy could run 10 miles a day easy, I’m not kidding. He’s learned an off switch but yeah. I think it’s good for ppl to be hesitant unless you get a lazy German Shepherd(Which really wouldn’t be within the standard but i digress).My dogs parents were ipo3 and I asked specifically for a high energy high drive pup so I guess I jumped right in the deep end.. lol.You could get a mellow low drive dog and it would probably be a cake walk compared to how raising my guy was. I was also a first time owner though. It was a big learning curve I had to go to training n everything. Sometimes I see people with a gsd puppy at petco or something and I kinda want to say hey you kno that thing is gonna get crazy right? Lol. But tbh having my psycho makes me never want a calm dog again. Im considering a white Shepherd and I’m worried the temperament won’t be as “raw” as I’d like. If I visit a breeder andtheir dog doesn’t want to maul me I don’t want a puppy from them. To me a real gsd let’s you kno he’s there ;)
 

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this was my guy. An absolute ball Of energy till this day. I mean this guy could run 10 miles a day easy, I’m not kidding. He’s learned an off switch but yeah. I think it’s good for ppl to be hesitant unless you get a lazy German Shepherd(Which really wouldn’t be within the standard but i digress).My dogs parents were ipo3 and I asked specifically for a high energy high drive pup so I guess I jumped right in the deep end.. lol.You could get a mellow low drive dog and it would probably be a cake walk compared to how raising my guy was. I was also a first time owner though. It was a big learning curve I had to go to training n everything. Sometimes I see people with a gsd puppy at petco or something and I kinda want to say hey you kno that thing is gonna get crazy right? Lol. But tbh having my psycho makes me never want a calm dog again. Im considering a white Shepherd and I’m worried the temperament won’t be as “raw” as I’d like. If I visit a breeder andtheir dog doesn’t want to maul me I don’t want a puppy from them. To me a real gsd let’s you kno he’s there ;)
There is a vast difference between a high drive dog and a poorly bred dog with frantic energy. That's the point. I have raised litters of working dogs and litters of pups with crappy genetics and they are worlds apart.
Yes GSD's are a working breed, with needs to dispel the energy and utilize their intellect. But they are NOT monsters, or even particularly difficult IF a person understands what they are getting. A Border Collie, Heeler, Field Retriever or Spaniel are all going to pose the same challenges. Heck my Dane was a more challenging pup then most GSD's. Well bred JRT pups are little demon seeds.
Having owned and raised numerous breeds and types I can without hesitation say that most of the issues novice owners face with GSD pups are due solely to a lack of structure and common sense.
Look at it this way, cars have been around for better then a hundred years now. But drivers trained in the last 10 years do not know that they need to check tire pressure because a sensor in the car now does it for them. The tires are a key safety component, but no one knows to LOOK at them! As a society we lack any form of common sense.
The problem is not that the dogs have changed, although they have, it's that 50 years ago people who owned working dogs USED them! They knew that a Shepherd was meant to have a job, they got them because they needed a dog to do a job. Spaniels, Retrievers, Hounds, Herders were not residents of Suburbia.
 

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Mine are 9 and 6 and I still sometimes feel like I don't do enough with them after reading some threads on this forum. Neither of mine were over the top in biting or exercise requirements. You have a five year old but you have other dogs, and know what care is needed there. I have a granddaughter that we just kept a very close eye on with the puppies, then dogs. They are inseparable and are so excited when she gets here. You will have much better chance of a great outcome if you have taken care in your breeder selection, sounds like you did. Too many people out there breeding with no purpose or clarity of thought with what they are doing. Have fun with that puppy!
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A young puppy should not walk more than 1/2 mile a day unless it’s off leash and can rest on its own. You don’t want to over do exercise with a puppy. I didn‘t go 1 mile on leash until mine were a year old. You will be fine. Don’t overthink and don’t worry too much. Even a low drive puppy could have a few high powered months as a baby, but they settle in. Teach your dog calming techniques. I tethered mine to the table next to me when I ate and he soon learned to sleep or lie quietly next to me whenever we are sitting down.
 

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There is a vast difference between a high drive dog and a poorly bred dog with frantic energy. That's the point. I have raised litters of working dogs and litters of pups with crappy genetics and they are worlds apart.
Yes GSD's are a working breed, with needs to dispel the energy and utilize their intellect. But they are NOT monsters, or even particularly difficult IF a person understands what they are getting. A Border Collie, Heeler, Field Retriever or Spaniel are all going to pose the same challenges. Heck my Dane was a more challenging pup then most GSD's. Well bred JRT pups are little demon seeds.
Having owned and raised numerous breeds and types I can without hesitation say that most of the issues novice owners face with GSD pups are due solely to a lack of structure and common sense.
Look at it this way, cars have been around for better then a hundred years now. But drivers trained in the last 10 years do not know that they need to check tire pressure because a sensor in the car now does it for them. The tires are a key safety component, but no one knows to LOOK at them! As a society we lack any form of common sense.
The problem is not that the dogs have changed, although they have, it's that 50 years ago people who owned working dogs USED them! They knew that a Shepherd was meant to have a job, they got them because they needed a dog to do a job. Spaniels, Retrievers, Hounds, Herders were not residents of Suburbia.
I agree my dog turned into a total different dog once I learned how to give him structure and “lead” him
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Look, I'm about 50. People used to get dogs and that was that. I was honestly dumbfounded to learn that people were shocked by puppies biting and peeing and chewing, being puppies. I am glad in some respects that we have evolved and treat our animals different then when I was a child but where has common sense gone? It's a puppy not some rare and fragile species. Feed it, train it, love it. Where does the issue lie?
Twenty some odd years ago I was informed that I NEEDED to take prenatal classes before my son was born. Because apparently we are now incapable of having children without classes. The same thing has happened with getting a puppy. Education is good, but holy crap do we need to overthink every blessed thing we do?
Just enjoy your puppy.
lol Right? I was just thinking how people make these puppies out to be monsters that require someone at home to exercise them all day long. Both my dogs are high drive sport dogs. I never needed to do that. If people really need to exercise their dogs several hours a day, either they have a monster of their own making by not teaching the dog to settle or the dog genetically is not balanced and has no off switch.
I appreciate all the replies, but these are the types that are very reassuring.

I love Mals, but I knew I couldn't give that breed the purpose it needs. I was very discouraged when reading some of the more 'extreme' replies regarding GSDs, but I'm glad I'm beginning to see things refocus.
 

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JMO .... this forum has many threads about dogs from 6 months of age to a year and a half--raised from a pup and now has developed some sort of behavioral issue ... that's typically because the growing pup was not taught boundaries and does not respect the owner even a little bit--I don't post in those threads as much as I did once upon a time because many times telling the truth gets relabeled as "judgemental" or "snarky".. in today's just tell me what I want to hear world.......short story is what you're reading online most times is about a pup becoming a adult--knows no boundaries at all and respects no one in the house OR respects one person and when that person is gone all *ell breaks loose for folks left in the house....

You've done your homework and sounds like you have a good mind set as far as exercise and getting the pup into a routine....I have a very close friend who has always had Akitas much like myself and my love of GSDs... so I know how strong willed and head strong Akitas are as a breed in general.kudos to you.....so don't over think this based on stories you see online most of them are "owner" failures..not a fault of the breed...you've got this -you'll be fine....(y)
yes and no.

the easiest time to own a GSD is from 8 weeks to 6 mos and then from about 8 to 12 years (seniors rock).

Adolescence is real. German Shepherd puppies become adolescents. You can be an experienced amazing trainer and your puppies will become adolescents. They’ll go through funky stages, especially during growth spurts, They have wonky fear stages.

Some days, they need to sleep all day. Some days, it’s 9pm zoomies for hours. It doesn’t matter what training (or for those of us with working dogs, what work) you had planned, kiddo is growing. His brain is growing, and you have to adjust.

Akitas are a handful. A close friend has Akitas and I’m impressed how she handles them. They’re not GSDs though.

Day one, after teaching puppy his name and starting recall, I’d be teaching puppy “Gentle.” He’s soon going to be nearly as tall and will outweigh a 5 year old. He’ll also be boisterous


I’d socialize the heck out of him, not worry too much about obedience skills, and mostly, ensure he understands he must be gentle around young people.

Physical exercise is great, but mental exercise is what wears a dog out. Puppy kindergarten, Nose Works, Puppy Agility, Basic obedience classes, etc. Keep that pup busy.

Then you’ll likely be fine,
 
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