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How many of you use command words that are not English or not "the norm"?

  • I use only English command words

    Votes: 24 34.3%
  • I use Non English command words

    Votes: 36 51.4%
  • I use non traditional command words (please explain)

    Votes: 2 2.9%
  • Other

    Votes: 8 11.4%

  • Total voters
    70
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Discussion Starter #1
Dime The Sheepdog Only Understands Irish

I came across this article today and it got me wondering:

How many of you dog owners out there train your dogs with command words that aren't English or are maybe different from the norm? ie: ("touch" instead of "come", etc.) Do you feel it gives you better control over your dog?

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I use German for the competition field and english in the house!
 

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I use Russian and English. Mostly English right now because I want her solid in the English commands so that my family can get her to do things, but will be reincorporating Russian back into her training soon.
 

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We use mostly English. The only exception is release words and their "safe" word (letting them know to stop whatever they're doing NOW). Kaos' words are in German, and Sherman's words are Spanish. I like their release words especially to be non-English, because I don't want it to be anything we use in daily life....and with 3 kids there are a lot of words flying around here.
 

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Mine right now are all trained in English, Spanish and hand commands. I am very grateful for having taught hand signals since my 2 shepherds got older and deaf (TJ is gone now) but it has helped greatly when the hearing goes.

My new pup will most likely be trained in German and hand signals. And my husbands version of English commands. :rolleyes:
 

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One of the poll choices should be "multiple languages." I use German and English, and expect my dogs to respond to both because.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I use German, English, hand signals and facial expressions LOL They are expected to comply to all.
I use facial expressions too. LOL - In fact, sometimes my wordless "disapproval scowl" gets a better response from the dog when she's doing something naughty than if I repeatedly give a verbal command.
 

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For my competition commands my two Shepherds are trained in Hungarian, my Leonberger in German. All of my dogs will respond to hand signals.

All house commands are in English - mostly so my husband has an easier time...LOL
 

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My pup is being taught czech and hand signals.

My older dog was taught in english and hand signals, learned czech himself just watching me and the pup.
 

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I use only English words and hand commands, but some commands are not actually human words but noises like eh and uh-uh, shh shh means move along in herding, stuff like that. To make a point of how much we communicate with our body language and placement, my herding trainer had me stand perfectly still and give Stosh some commands to see how well he responded, then the reverse- no words but only my body. It's interesting
 

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English in both competition and in the home except for the blind search in SchH where I use a German word.
 

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Most of my commands are English (sit, search, look, watch him, down, touch, speak, whisper, bang, rollover, take it, hold, bring, hit it, plus all the agility obstacles to name a few...) but a few of my SchH commands are German (aus, platz, voran, voraus, revier, heir, steh, fuss).
 

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Most of Dakota's main commands are in German, but his fun commands, for the most part, are English. It's nice to know both because we have different "versions" of different commands if you can call them such. Such as "fuß" is a tight, precise, competition heel, and "heel" is a leisurely command that just means to walk close to my left side.

Alice is trained in English because she was originally just a foster. I wanted the commands to be easy for folks to say, but now she shall be learning a few German commands as well. :)
 
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