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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My dog never was close to a cat growing up. But now, we have a cat, both are adults. Initially the cat did its arched back and hiss thing, which stopped my dog in her tracks. But on a later encounter the cat decided to run... My dog couldn't resist the chase, and since they've been very tense around each other.

What I've done is keep Nyx on leash while the cat is present, thinking that the "novelty" will wear off. And just in general letting the cat and dog to be in the same space as much as possible to desensitize her.

It's been 2 weeks now, and Nyx still shows WAY too much interest in the cat and everything she does!

Any insights or successes or failure stories would help...
 

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What is the cat's reaction now? Still running or holding place. I think the leash and control when together is the beat idea. This is what I was afraid would happen if we got a cat, so we brought home kittens. What about getting a kitten to grow up with both.?
 

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Insight on this topic would be helpful to me as well.

We have a 10 week old and he had a similar introduction to our cat. At first deterred by the hissing but then the cat ran and he realized the fun of it. Now the pup is on a leash and shows a lot of interest in the cat.

We did the LAT technique and still do. Pup looks at cat, gets a 'yes' and then treat. LAT hasn't solved it by any means but it has gotten better. The pup now thinks other things might be better than cats but he's still very interested. When the cat walks into the same room as the pup, the pup will check with me wondering if he gets a treat for seeing the cat.

After LAT, the pup second guesses running at the cat if she's on the floor. The pup will still try and chase if the cat is running. And the pup still tries to engage a run if the cat is lazing around. The cat is getting better at not responding to the pups taunting.

But LAT just seems like a first step.
 

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It’s sooo fun to chase a cat, just ask my dogs. It has taken almost 3 years to get them to stop acting like total idiots around my cats. Part of the problem is the cats themselves. Mine don’t hiss or scratch or do regular cat things to warn a dog off. They run. Or, in the case of Mimi, will fall over dead like a possum.

I can’t do anything about the cats running helter skelter, so I used a baby gate. Cats on one side, dogs on the other. It didn’t take long for the cats to figure out that jumping into the dog side was a big mistake. The gate has kept the cats safe, while also letting them see each other. One day I just started bringing Scarlet in the cat side, and made her lie down while I watched tv. They’ve finally gotten used to each other but it’s been a long process. I still have to say “leave the kitties alone” when Scarlet gets too rambunctious.
 

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One of the biggest mistakes I see between dogs and cats is that people fail to socialize and expose their dog/cat to dogs/cats. Too late for that now. If your cat is standing their hissing, it probably doesn't really fear your dog. That's where things can get tricky because your dog can be a serious threat to your cat and things can end badly. Rough play is also a no no with cats as it can escalate into something ugly. If it were me, I would insist that the dog strictly ignore the cat at all times. I would not let the dog interact BUT I would let the cat interact overtime with complete supervision. At that point, you will be in a position to monitor behavior and administer appropriate warnings and corrections as you see necessary to achieve the behaviors you want to see. Unfortunately, some dogs who had little exposure to cats as a pup never come to safely tolerate a cat although others are just fine.
 

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My cat simply goes under my bed when she hears Blu approaching. They tolerate each other but I don't ever see them becoming "friends"...
 

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A lot depends on the individual dog and cat in question. This took a ton of work:



Scarlet (dog) just turned 3, and Mimi (cat) is 7.
 

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A lot depends on the individual dog and cat in question. This took a ton of work:



Scarlet (dog) just turned 3, and Mimi (cat) is 7.
Wow! They say dogs sometimes look like their people, but I don't think I've heard that dogs can look like their cats. That's so cute.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
What is the cat's reaction now? Still running or holding place. I think the leash and control when together is the beat idea. This is what I was afraid would happen if we got a cat, so we brought home kittens. What about getting a kitten to grow up with both.?
With previous dogs I've always gotten them a kitten, and it always worked out fine. This cat is several years old. It belongs to my brother, we're the guests, so starting with a kitten isn't an option. On the bright side though, the cat and my brother's dog get along well, and the cat is showing less fear and some curiosity about Nyx. It's hard to tell if the cat is getting used to her presence or just taunting her though. But it is coming closer and closer over time, and doesn't have any problem holding its ground if it feels threatened while inside...outside the cat always runs, and Nyx can't resist the chase.
 

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I am interested in this as well. It is not going well for me. I have done everything recommended. Socialization, treating them together, leash, etc. Our cat (Bengal) is five and is a very social cat. I don't like cats or get the rewards of ownership, but if I had to have a cat (came with the girlfriend), this would be it. The worst thing she does is meow annoyingly for no reason. She loves to be around people and greets us at the door. She would always be in the same room as us and really looked forward to cuddling up at night while watching TV.

Her life has changed drastically when we brought Frisco home two months ago. We gated off the Kitchen and Family room for him. This is where we do 90% of our living. She basically is now not allowed in these spaces because of Frisco. On top of it all, she stands on the other side of the gates and teases him. He goes crazy, barks, jumps, etc. It's unbearable. He has high prey drive which does not help. In the beginning, I was very hesitant to put them together for fear she would scratch an unassuming pups eyes or nose. Now that he is bigger, I fear for her. A few times he has walked in the front door with me and she was standing there and he got her pretty good. Basically pounces on her and mouths her. He has not bit hard enough to do damage, but I was also quick on pulling him off. She hisses, but has yet to scratch or correct him, which I think would help. He was never deterred by hissing.

We recently could not deal with the chaos anymore and let a friend take the cat for a few months. In hindsight, I think may be a mistake, because when she comes back, it will be HIS house and he will be bigger and more mature and I think he will hurt her. I recently started the prong collar and am thinking of getting her back and trying to train him on this using the prong.

Trust me, I have tried all the recommended approach for puppy meets cat.
 

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A lot depends on the individual dog and cat in question. This took a ton of work:



Scarlet (dog) just turned 3, and Mimi (cat) is 7.
So did this.On a plane, about to take off.
Will post more later.
 

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Have re-trained 2 GSD rescues- both 2 yr. olds. Both females. One assumed purebred, one possible husky mix/GSD.

Both were only allowed near cats on leash in house, for 1 week-2 weeks. They were both pretty safe after about 1 week

and I did 24/7 cat training. No exceptions, no allowances. They were never , ever allowed to chase, rough up, or play

with the cats. This was the first ironclad rule in my home. The most recent GSD mix was almost feral, unsocialized to

any other animals and could be hard headed and very dog aggressive. The old cat MAY have used nails at some point,

not sure, but even this newish rescue learned quickly that cats were off-limits for several reasons. Dog has pretty high

drive and was much harder to re-train nOT to chase or herd the horses here. Again consistency. Every single time

the opportunity is there to chase. You must be right there and handy to correct. But remember to praise when they

do the right thing and relax around the prey animal. They will get it. now my current dog is best friends w/ the smallest

cat and pretty good friends with the old cat.

My next trick is to teach her not to chase the 4 Sandhill Cranes that show up everyday for all day and hang around my farm. They squawk at her but it doesn't deter her. My last gsd would allow a flock of Wild Turkeys to be eating seed corn
thrown on the ground all around her. She learned not to chase them and just accept them.
 

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My cats don’t hiss, slap, bite, or otherwise act like real cats. So all that was a non-issue in our case. I basically had them on opposite sides of a baby gate for months and months. They all would stare at each other through the gate. Eventually I brought Scarlet in the room with the cats. I made her stay on the couch with me and watch tv. The cats were nosy and would sneak up the back of the couch. I praised Scarlet for calm behavior, and a stern “leave the kitties alone!” if she got too worked up over them. I didn’t let her chase, but she could nose around on them if they came up. Eventually they all came to a truce. I can (and do) leave them alone together now. It’s been a LONG process. Over 2 years.

 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
What concerns me is that I KNOW my dog. Since she's become an adult, she does not back down. If a dog snarls at her she snarls back, and will engage unless called away. The cat, has become more calm around the dog, but will also stand her ground. If she were to engage my dog at any point, I'm very sure my dog would respond in kind. So I've been VERY careful not to let that happen.

That being said, at some point you have to let the animals investigate each other or it becomes a forbidden fruit kind of thing - the more she can't the more she wants to!

Tonight I have them both in the same room, Nyx is off leash. Cat shows no fear, Nyx cannot do anything but stare. I guess just keep on and give them more time?
 

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One of the most important things is to very strongly enforce a no chase rule. The dog is never allowed to chase the cat and a correction whenever it happens. Doesn't have to be harsh or anything but you have to make it clear it's a firm boundary. As cowboys girls said you also need to stop from fixating. Don't let them get all worked up and focused in on the cat. Yes the cat is there, no you don't get to just stare. I do the same with my dogs that are very good with cats.

After that you just need to do a wait and see. Once the cat is comfortable, and since this cat has grown up around dogs they'll generally approach the dog. From there you just have to watch carefully and be ready to intervene if the dog moves to lunge towards the cat.

Cats that run are very rewarding for dogs. Cats that are friendly are easier to work with depending on the dog. Too much friendliness and approaching the wrong dog can get them killed, but running can make a dog that would've otherwise done well go after the cat.

It's hard to say since you say she won't back down and are worried she may attack if the cat hisses. Most dogs it'll stop and make them pause unless they have high prey drive and want to kill them no matter what. So keep her leashed and make it clear that she's not allowed to start a fuss if the cat hisses. Cat hisses she has to back off. Make her retreat and lay down.
 

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One of the most important things is to very strongly enforce a no chase rule. The dog is never allowed to chase the cat and a correction whenever it happens. Doesn't have to be harsh or anything but you have to make it clear it's a firm boundary. As cowboys girls said you also need to stop from fixating. Don't let them get all worked up and focused in on the cat. Yes the cat is there, no you don't get to just stare. I do the same with my dogs that are very good with cats.

After that you just need to do a wait and see. Once the cat is comfortable, and since this cat has grown up around dogs they'll generally approach the dog. From there you just have to watch carefully and be ready to intervene if the dog moves to lunge towards the cat.

Cats that run are very rewarding for dogs. Cats that are friendly are easier to work with depending on the dog. Too much friendliness and approaching the wrong dog can get them killed, but running can make a dog that would've otherwise done well go after the cat.

It's hard to say since you say she won't back down and are worried she may attack if the cat hisses. Most dogs it'll stop and make them pause unless they have high prey drive and want to kill them no matter what. So keep her leashed and make it clear that she's not allowed to start a fuss if the cat hisses. Cat hisses she has to back off. Make her retreat and lay down.
If the dog is fixating I would correct that.
What is your idea of a correction/fix to stop the chase? I was thinking prong collar, but it seems so many people here don't do this, so I am curious what correction you recommend? "No, No, No" certainly isn't working even on a leash with harness.
 

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What is your idea of a correction/fix to stop the chase? I was thinking prong collar, but it seems so many people here don't do this, so I am curious what correction you recommend? "No, No, No" certainly isn't working even on a leash with harness.
I have had a leash snap on a flat collar work fine for some dogs. I'd try a prong collar. A verbal correction alone might work on some dogs.

Basically, depends on the dog. The biggest job of predatory behavior I ever dealt with was with my one dog and farm animals and with him a casual glance was all that was allowed. I could not allow him to stare for any amount of seconds because then the hunt was on. With him I used an E Collar.

Also I think it takes less of a correction and is more effective if you get it at the very first nanosecond of fixating rather than waiting for them to launch. By the time they chase they are probably full of adrenaline and 1. they've already gotten some reward for doing it (brain chemistry and thrill of the chase) and 2. it will take more to stop them
 

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Whatever it is needs to be strong enough to snap them out of it and/or also make them take note of you as being the thing they need to pay attention to more than the prey animal.
 
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