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Hi to all. About a month ago I got a 3 year old well trained (IPO1) GS. I primarily want him as a companion / pet but most importantly as a guard to property and family. Up to now however he does not show any sign of protection willingness. Is it too early? How long should it take until he feels at home?
Please note that for all his life up to now he has been living with the breeder so no need for protection - instead he was accustomed to much socializing. Please advice. Thank you
 

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There's no set time frame, but the number one goal should be his acceptance of you and your family to be that companion. The IPO 1 just means he has an IPO1. It doesn't mean he'll protect anything and if thats a direction you want to go, the first thing needs to be you having access to a good trainer. The key word is good, not just some hack that will cause you more problems then you want agitating your dog.
 

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Thank you for the answer and I fully appreciate the suggestion - will follow. I have a further question though: given that a dog of that age (3 years) has his protective instincts somewhat tamed (I guess)through full socialization, in order to participate in events and shows, while at the same time there was no requirement for him to protect "anything", can this be turned around by training? will his natural instincts "come back"? or he is tamed for life. I appreciate opinions and knowledge on this. Did anybody else had similar experience?
 

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You are confusing protectiveness with reactiveness. Protectiveness comes from a place of deep inner confidence. Dogs feels secure and happy, and when things become a threat, they have the inner mental and physical strength to take action.

A dog that acts agressively at everything and anything, barks at everything, is reactive. This is insecurity and fear, just below the surface, looking for excuses to bubble up to the surface and set off a chain reaction of over-the-top bravado behaviour of lunging, barking, snarling, growling, hackling, all in the hope that the display of aggression will scare away the threat.

Confident dogs with the inner genetic trait of protectiveness don't need to act this way. Often, they are the best, most friendly, calm and easy-going dogs around, with the ability to discern harmless situations from real threats. Socialization does not dampen protectiveness, if anything, it hones it, as it gives the dog a wider snapshot of "normal", that helps in them being able to discern what is not normal.

Just having a well-behaved, well-trained GSD at your side is enough of a deterrent that it may be the best protection of all.
 
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