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We will probably be getting a 1 year old GSD Sunday. He has been living in one home since he was a couple of months old.
They are rehoming him due to there daughter's baby's allergies.

How long should I keep the GSD at my home before turning him over to a trainer for 2 weeks?

Thanks Thom
 

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Ideally the new dog would be given a few weeks to acclimate to his new home.When he's settled in and you've developed a relationship with him and a comfortable routine,have a trainer come to your home to work with both of you.We humans are the ones that need most of the training:)
 

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It wouldn’t be my first choice but if you’re set on board and train... I’d take him straight to the training facility from the previous home. A smoother transition for both of you. To have him settle in then leave then back again seems like unnecessary uprooting.
 

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Is there a specific behavior or reason you want to do a board and train?

Normally with a new dog, especially a rehome, I give them a good 3 weeks to settle in and bond with me. I would get them on a crate regimen that way to don't have to deal with them getting into trouble with your back turned for 5 minutes. Devise a schedule that works for you and is fair for your new dog and then stick to it. Knowing what to expect helps with transitions, and training in general.

If you are dead set to board and train for 2 weeks, I agree with Fodder. Old home, to training, then to his final home to settle in.
 

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What's your experience with training a dog? If it's very limited, or you've only had small dogs before, YOU ARE THE ONE THAT NEEDS TRAINING!!

I'd skip the board and train, and either have a trainer come to my home, or find classes from a trainer that is used to dealing with large dogs that may be high drive or have some aggression. Don't go to Pet Smart, and try to find a balanced trainer that allows corrections rather than purely positive.
 

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My hit on this ---- how soon? 10 to 12 years. In other words, I wouldn't do it. It concerns me that you are taking in a dog with this in mind.
A million times what middleofnowhere said!

Why? All I can think is, "Poor dog." No matter which way you do it - training first, or your home first, it's a lot of change. The dog is losing everything he has ever known and being quickly thrown into multiple new situations. You haven't said the dog had major behavioral issues. Why can't he train and bond with you, in your home? In most cases, I don't want somebody else training my dog. And - if you don't work along with the trainer why would the dog listen to you?
 

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Do you know this trainer? Are you sure you can trust them and completely approve of their techniques? Why are you board/training them? Can you be as specific as possible? What are your goals? Most training occurs because the *owner* needs training.



My puppy will stay a few days with a trainer that I've known for decades, whom I've worked with many of my puppies and adults with. I know this person well and trust them with my dogs completely. I've been to their home and they board in their home. Other trainers I know respect her.



Why am I boarding my pup for 2-3 days? Because I want my dogs to learn as early as possible (and repeatedly after) that they're fine away from home, that they can trust friendly strangers that I hand them over to (with a "go on" cue as they walk away from me). My dogs always do well when they're boarded (when we need to travel without them) and when they have to be hospitalized which most dogs need at some point in their lives. Not knowing how to be away from home is crazy stress for an already sick or injured dog in hospital.


GSDs tend to be velco dogs, and I really need my GSDs to be able to be independent.



Would I just hand over my pup or a new dog to a trainer that I've heard/read good things about, that I don't know their training techniques, that I haven't *already* done some training (like obedience and private classes) with? No. Never.



I also wouldn't hand over an adult dog I've had for years without doing this foundational work. So again, do you know this trainer & their techniques extremely well? What exactly are your goals? Not "a well behaved dog," but why does he need to be boarded to be trained?



Board and train is expensive. Why not do six weeks of private lessons 1-2x a week? It probably costs about the same (maybe less) and you'll learn more about your dog. You'll also build a relationship with your dog.
 

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It wouldn’t be my first choice but if you’re set on board and train... I’d take him straight to the training facility from the previous home. A smoother transition for both of you. To have him settle in then leave then back again seems like unnecessary uprooting.

This is pretty much the way I’ve done it. I am a board and train trainer, and get dogs pretty often straight from rescue. New owner has them a day or two then to me for training then back home. Once home I work with the owner and dog. But doing the board and train gives a jumpstart on the dog. Plus it gives me a chance to learn and know the dog without the interference of the owner. I know what methods work for the dog, I’ve taught it how to learn, and now I know how to help the new owner continue on.

As for uprooting dogs and so on. Dogs are pretty adaptive and resiliant. Depending on the environment they were in, shelter, or even kennels at a rescue facility, then in most cases they’re just happy to be out of that environment and in to a house.
 

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This is pretty much the way I’ve done it. I am a board and train trainer, and get dogs pretty often straight from rescue. New owner has them a day or two then to me for training then back home. Once home I work with the owner and dog. But doing the board and train gives a jumpstart on the dog. Plus it gives me a chance to learn and know the dog without the interference of the owner. I know what methods work for the dog, I’ve taught it how to learn, and now I know how to help the new owner continue on.

As for uprooting dogs and so on. Dogs are pretty adaptive and resiliant. Depending on the environment they were in, shelter, or even kennels at a rescue facility, then in most cases they’re just happy to be out of that environment and in to a house.

I'm sending you Shadow. Have fun with that! Lol.

Seriously though. I am a control freak and I have a guardian personality. I would never trust my dog to anyone, I didn't like my boss handling my assigned dogs, and they belonged to him.
If you must send your dog to a trainer I would do it right away, as in no time in your house straight from pick up to the trainer.
 

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It wouldn’t be my first choice but if you’re set on board and train... I’d take him straight to the training facility from the previous home. A smoother transition for both of you. To have him settle in then leave then back again seems like unnecessary uprooting.
I do board and trains for problem dogs. I teach owners to train non problem dogs. I certainly wouldn't take a dog on a board and train for general obedience only. YouTube, a clicker and dinner over a couple weeks will suffice for that.

If it's a dog with bite history or aggression issues, I would much rather have the dog straight away. It's much easier to introduce the dog to a new environment with a set of rules in place and consistency from the new owners.

In general, dogs take it day by day. A good trainer will make a dog feel comfortable and welcome. They bounce around pretty well in most cases.
 
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