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Except I am not advocating larger GSDs, so why is this relevant to me?
I don't know?

My comments were general in nature, I suppose my mistake was quoting you in the first place. Mea Culpa.
 

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Don't get me wrong, I TOTALLY get your point, but I am not saying my dog was the ideal. He was from VERY large chested, long bodied GSDs, he used to have a weight issue (not as a puppy, but around 1-3 years), and he grew way too fast. He was 14 lbs at 6 weeks which from my understanding is what they should weigh as 8-10 wks. But he did not have an obesity problem at 6 months, and I am in no way saying 'bigger is better'.
 

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There's different shapes too. GPs are taller than GSDs and generally just thicker, so naturally they will be heavier. Here is my GP at 7 1/2 months, 100 lbs in the photo. Draco was maybe 80 lbs at that age. She is now 115 lbs and he is 107. I think his build is different than a 'proper' GSD. His ideal weight would be 100 lbs according to the vet. He was 132 last year, his body score was a 4, it's now a 3. I don't have any side shots of Draco at 6 months available to me right now, I'll try to get some off my laptop after work.

This is the best most recent pic showing that he has a waist line, and I feel his ribs again and see them depending on his position :)
https://www.instagram.com/p/BRWorvYjGFz/?taken-by=dracothegsd&hl=en

I've heard that at 6 months a dog is approx 75% of its adult weight, if that's true, then 75 lbs matches his said ideal weight of 100 lbs.
 

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Congrats on the weight loss.

GP's and GSD's are completely different dogs.

I looked at his picture and he is a nice looking dog. I hate to be contrary or run the risk of offending you again, but IMHO, 100 lbs is not his ideal weight. If he were mine I'd take another 10 lbs off him. :)

Your GP looks great!
 

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Congrats on the weight loss.

GP's and GSD's are completely different dogs.

I looked at his picture and he is a nice looking dog. I hate to be contrary or run the risk of offending you again, but IMHO, 100 lbs is not his ideal weight. If he were mine I'd take another 10 lbs off him. :)

Your GP looks great!

I can deal with him being 10 lbs overweight, but not 40 :p We will see how much he loses. He lost another 4 lbs in the last 3 weeks, I thought he stopped losing when he his 115, but he didn't. He is not fit, but he is healthy, and that's all I was hoping for so I am proud of him.
 

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Fit and healthy are two different things, a person who does not really exercise but eats well can be healthy, but still not fit. I'd rather trust my vet.
 

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Another thing to think about is that many vets are so used to seeing overweight pets they have a skewed idea of what an idea weight should be, this is pretty well known with sport dog handlers. I've heard many experienced handlers and breeders say that a little underweight is actually healthy. Not saying this applies to your vet but it is something to take into consideration.
 

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My 2 cents, I think weight is not the only factor defining "fit", will need to take into considerations other factors. Carrying an extra 10% body weight may be really bad for an older dog with light bones, poor diet, low stamina, inappropriate level and types of activity, more fat instead of muscle etc. On the other hand, a mature adult dog in top years, with big strong bones and mostly muscle, good diet and good stamina, regular appropriate exercises instead of a weekend warrior etc, may have no problem carrying that extra 10% weight. Moreover, I guess it's hard to have a ultimate guideline for weight.
 

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This is my dog, he is not obese but I do not consider him fit, his structure is sound and he shows no signs of joint strain or anything of the life. I get it, a GSD SHOULD be 66-88 lbs, he isn't, but he also likely would not be fit in those ranges, either, because with more muscle toning and less fat he would likely not lose too many lbs.
 

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Not so sure what the difficulty is here.

48#s - 88#s is standard.

Size/weight
Male dogs:
Height at the withers: 60 cm to 65 cm
Weight: 30 kg to 40 kg

Female dogs:
Height at the withers: 55 cm to 60 cm
Weight: 22 kg to 32 kg

http://www.fci.be/Nomenclature/Standards/166g01-en.pdf
 

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Not so sure what the difficulty is here.

48#s - 88#s is standard.

Size/weight
Male dogs:
Height at the withers: 60 cm to 65 cm
Weight: 30 kg to 40 kg

Female dogs:
Height at the withers: 55 cm to 60 cm
Weight: 22 kg to 32 kg

http://www.fci.be/Nomenclature/Standards/166g01-en.pdf
I think the confusion or issue is that not all GSD's fall into the standard. Therefore to judge all GSD's on that standard may be unfair or unrealistic. My dog's littermate was a solid 100 lb dog that competed at the USA Nationals 3 times. He is a unique exception, a rarity. Boomer was never heavier than 84lbs. His brother's legs are as thick as a woman's arm. He is a tall, lean and very muscular athletic dog. He is also 11 and I'm sure weighs under 100 lbs now.

This really shouldn't be that difficult and I've said it many times and the chart in this thread spells it out pretty well. If you run your fingers down your dogs side and it is hard to feel each rib, your dog is fat. If you can run your finger down your dog's side and can easily and distinctly feel each rib, your dog is probably at the proper weight, with out a layer of fat over them. If the ribs are really noticeable and your finger feels like it is hitting deep ruts then your dog may need to gain a lb or two.

The waist line is a good indicator as well, but not as good as seeing and feeling the ribs. GSD's should have well muscled and defined shoulders and their rear legs should be well muscled on a fit dog. You should be able to see the muscles stand out in the chest and shoulder. If you grab your dog's rear leg from behind (behind the knee, by the tail) it should be firm, solid and be a handful of muscle for a dog in peak shape. Older dogs will have less muscle mass in their rear legs.

I really do not go by the scale at all, I don't care what my dogs weigh. My ego does not ride on how big my dog is or how much my dog weighs. I go by their physical condition. I look and feel the ribs, I watch the waist line and I check on my dogs muscle mass. None of my dogs are fat, quite the opposite. The are all trim, even skinny but well muscled. Much like an Olympic Sprinter, they are athletes after all. That is what the breed was designed to be, herding dogs, working dogs and companions.

Hopefully, this thread will help some folks understand how to properly evaluate their dog's weight and learn that bigger or heavier is definitely not better. I see far too many GSD owners that do not understand how to properly gauge the right weight for their dog.
 

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Spot on as usual Slam!

I was just wondering why the normal sized GSDs as per the standard that weighed in the 48 - 66 pound range were being repeatedly excluded from desirable or acceptable size.

I think the confusion or issue is that not all GSD's fall into the standard. Therefore to judge all GSD's on that standard may be unfair or unrealistic. My dog's littermate was a solid 100 lb dog that competed at the USA Nationals 3 times. He is a unique exception, a rarity. Boomer was never heavier than 84lbs. His brother's legs are as thick as a woman's arm. He is a tall, lean and very muscular athletic dog. He is also 11 and I'm sure weighs under 100 lbs now.

This really shouldn't be that difficult and I've said it many times and the chart in this thread spells it out pretty well. If you run your fingers down your dogs side and it is hard to feel each rib, your dog is fat. If you can run your finger down your dog's side and can easily and distinctly feel each rib, your dog is probably at the proper weight, with out a layer of fat over them. If the ribs are really noticeable and your finger feels like it is hitting deep ruts then your dog may need to gain a lb or two.

The waist line is a good indicator as well, but not as good as seeing and feeling the ribs. GSD's should have well muscled and defined shoulders and their rear legs should be well muscled on a fit dog. You should be able to see the muscles stand out in the chest and shoulder. If you grab your dog's rear leg from behind (behind the knee, by the tail) it should be firm, solid and be a handful of muscle for a dog in peak shape. Older dogs will have less muscle mass in their rear legs.

I really do not go by the scale at all, I don't care what my dogs weigh. My ego does not ride on how big my dog is or how much my dog weighs. I go by their physical condition. I look and feel the ribs, I watch the waist line and I check on my dogs muscle mass. None of my dogs are fat, quite the opposite. The are all trim, even skinny but well muscled. Much like an Olympic Sprinter, they are athletes after all. That is what the breed was designed to be, herding dogs, working dogs and companions.

Hopefully, this thread will help some folks understand how to properly evaluate their dog's weight and learn that bigger or heavier is definitely not better. I see far too many GSD owners that do not understand how to properly gauge the right weight for their dog.
 

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I see far too many GSD owners that do not understand how to properly gauge the right weight for their dog.
Yes. This.

In the same vein, I also see many dog owners who stick their fingers in their ears and start shouting "LA LA LA MY DOG ISN'T OBESE LA LA LA"

When the reality is they have a barrel with legs. I've seen pictures of dogs with literal fat rolls and comments from owners saying things like "He doesn't look obese to me" or "He's got a waist!" - all while their poor dog suffers, sometimes for years. :(
 

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I think the confusion or issue is that not all GSD's fall into the standard. Therefore to judge all GSD's on that standard may be unfair or unrealistic. My dog's littermate was a solid 100 lb dog that competed at the USA Nationals 3 times. He is a unique exception, a rarity. Boomer was never heavier than 84lbs. His brother's legs are as thick as a woman's arm. He is a tall, lean and very muscular athletic dog. He is also 11 and I'm sure weighs under 100 lbs now.

This really shouldn't be that difficult and I've said it many times and the chart in this thread spells it out pretty well. If you run your fingers down your dogs side and it is hard to feel each rib, your dog is fat. If you can run your finger down your dog's side and can easily and distinctly feel each rib, your dog is probably at the proper weight, with out a layer of fat over them. If the ribs are really noticeable and your finger feels like it is hitting deep ruts then your dog may need to gain a lb or two.

The waist line is a good indicator as well, but not as good as seeing and feeling the ribs. GSD's should have well muscled and defined shoulders and their rear legs should be well muscled on a fit dog. You should be able to see the muscles stand out in the chest and shoulder. If you grab your dog's rear leg from behind (behind the knee, by the tail) it should be firm, solid and be a handful of muscle for a dog in peak shape. Older dogs will have less muscle mass in their rear legs.

I really do not go by the scale at all, I don't care what my dogs weigh. My ego does not ride on how big my dog is or how much my dog weighs. I go by their physical condition. I look and feel the ribs, I watch the waist line and I check on my dogs muscle mass. None of my dogs are fat, quite the opposite. The are all trim, even skinny but well muscled. Much like an Olympic Sprinter, they are athletes after all. That is what the breed was designed to be, herding dogs, working dogs and companions.

Hopefully, this thread will help some folks understand how to properly evaluate their dog's weight and learn that bigger or heavier is definitely not better. I see far too many GSD owners that do not understand how to properly gauge the right weight for their dog.
This is a great post. It makes evaluating your dog's fitness accessible to the lay person. I like to be able to see a ripple of rib when the dog moves, not starkly visible but just enough that you wonder if it was the lighting as the dog moves past you. I don't keep her there 100% of the time, but that's always where I'm aiming.

Going back to the original question, I think my girl weighed about 45-50 lb at 6 months. She was pretty tall even at 6 months, not the 24" I measured at age 11 months, but tall.
 

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Diesel

Hi everyone

My Gsd was 21 kg at 6 months of age and is now weighing 29kg at 11 months of age. and I think even if I did over feed him which I dont he would never become obese due to his high-drive nature. My boy is always ON burning off energy for at least 12 hrs a day. I think if he was a more calmer boy (Not High-Drive)and just went out for the odd walk once or twice per day then I think the risk is there more for putting on weight. Hope that makes sense.
 
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