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I have a two year old GSD bitch. I am considering having her spayed. Not to reduce the chance of whoops litters. I have had unspayed bitches all my life. At those times, it is like simply controling your teenage daughters. But spay to prevent the chance of pyometra. The chance of pyometra has been studied in unspayed Golden Retrievers, in GSDs it is less. Inga has reached her full maturity. I am wondering, would it change her disposition and how would it change her physically?
 

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if you don't want her to gain weight, feed her a little less. I've had spayed females all my life and they have had good lives. My gal-dog is the first I've had go through heats. Her first was easy, her second not so much. Like women, I guess some bitches go through their heats easier than others. Since we like to go places, spaying meant that not only did she not go through hormonal grumpies, but we don't have to miss out on outings and events two or three times a year.

Other than that her general disposition and energy levels stayed the same.
 

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I had my bitch spayed at 26 months. She’s the same as she was before her spay. She also hasn’t gained any weight, and I haven’t had to reduce her food. She’s just as active and drivey as she was before the spay.
 

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I had many spayed females in the past and I had not seen any changes. After a certain age it is easier for dogs to put on weight so monitoring weight is just as important in intact dogs
 

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If you’re worried about pyometra, I wouldn’t rush to spay her at 2. I waited to spay Carly until she was 6 years old. She was a show dog, so I needed her to be intact to show. I got her AKC championship a few months before she turned 3. She had one litter after that. I had no intention of breeding or showing her anymore, but never even thought about spaying. But then I freaked out when she was 6 about the possibility of pyo, and had her spayed. She’s 8 now, and the same ol’ girl she’s always been.
 

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I had Sabi spayed around 3.5 years old. The only real difference I noted was that prior to her spay she was aggressive toward males while in heat, after her spay she hated them all the time. Since the guys had given her a nickname at 8 months that referenced her broad back end I cannot say that spaying attributed to weight gain. Lol. She was just one of those girls that gained weight easily. Poor thing was on a diet most of her life.
She worked until she was 10 years old and her personality and drive remained the same. In fact without the hormonal ups and downs if anything she developed laser focus on her job.
I would guess that the increase in aggression noted in studies pertains to bitches who are spayed prior to growth completion and mental development. Since bitches tend to mature mentally much faster then males it would probably have little to no impact after about 14 months.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I had many spayed females in the past and I had not seen any changes. After a certain age it is easier for dogs to put on weight so monitoring weight is just as important in intact dogs
Yes. This weight gain thing has been happening to me personally. Also, I have been spayed. :D
 

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If you’re worried about pyometra, I wouldn’t rush to spay her at 2. I waited to spay Carly until she was 6 years old. She was a show dog, so I needed her to be intact to show. I got her AKC championship a few months before she turned 3. She had one litter after that. I had no intention of breeding or showing her anymore, but never even thought about spaying. But then I freaked out when she was 6 about the possibility of pyo, and had her spayed. She’s 8 now, and the same ol’ girl she’s always been.
Thats what I have been thinking - no hurry. Pyometra can happen when older reproductive systems develop cysts that get infected. This from https://vcahospitals.com/know-your-pet/pyometra-in-dogs

" Pyometra is a secondary infection that occurs as a result of hormonal changes in the female's reproductive tract. During estrus ("heat"), white blood cells, which normally protect against infection, are inhibited from entering the uterus. This allows sperm to safely enter the female's reproductive tract without being damaged or destroyed by these immune system cells. Following estrus ("heat") in the dog, progesterone hormone levels remain elevated up to two months and cause thickening of the lining of the uterus in preparation for pregnancy and fetal development. If pregnancy does not occur for several consecutive estrus cycles, the uterine lining continues to increase in thickness until cysts often form within the tissues (a condition called Cystic Endometrial Hyperplasia). The thickened, cystic lining secretes fluids that create an ideal environment for bacteria to grow in. Additionally, high progesterone levels inhibit the ability of the muscles in the wall of the uterus to contract and expel accumulated fluids or bacteria. The combination of these factors often leads to infection. "
 
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