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Discussion Starter #1
...remain patient with your dogs? This is my biggest challenge in dog training, I am a very impatient person and want results NOW. How do you train your dogs and remain patient even when it looks like they are not learning anything?
 

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You take a lot of deep breaths, smile and enjoy your puppy and remember that even little steps are steps forward. One day the light will go on and you will say to yourself, geeze I thought he wasn't getting it.

Life is fun for puppies, so maybe try incorporating more training into what you would consider play sessions.
 

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Patience is a virtue
Think back a month ago, 2 months ago, a year ago. Have things progressed since then??

Most likely! (if not, then maybe there is a problem) So they ARE learning!

Try not to get ahead of yourself... if you rush, it prob will take longer.

Just have fun and it wont matter how long it takes!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Very good points!!! You are right about looking back and thinking where we were a month ago, or a year ago...very good point. I never thought I would get a CDX on Cody but here we are!!!
 

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LOL I'm right there with you Superpup. I take a breath, walk away in some instances and remember what awesome parents my pup has. I tell myself she'll catch on soon and life is good then.
 

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I practice it doing small sessions. I work often with different breeds, but when training my own dog I tend to feel I advance too slowly. I used to own a Border Collie that could learn anything completely new in six repetitions and a full sequence in 15 minutes (she was my TV dog). Yes, GSDs are smart dogs and a great working breed in other aspects, I'm not sure I'd even own another BC because of the nerve issues of the breed, but I tend to loose my patience when after repeating, repeating and repeating the dog just begin to grasp the idea.

I just keep it short and one session voilá! the dog understand it and she never forgets.
 

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Oh my gosh, I am so bad at that... I am always looking at other breed of dogs and saying to myself.. they just must be fast learners or I am that bad of a trainer... LOL!!
 

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there is no impatience when training a dog. you train at there pace. you might want results now but that only works if you're the one in training. how old is your dog? what are you rushing or being impatient about? your dog is going to learn and he's/she's going to learn fast. don't expect your dog to learn something on the first few takes.

i always teach one thing at a time. we'll train 4 to 6 times a day for 10 minutes a session. once my dog learns whatever it is i'm teaching we move on to the next thing. i find they learn somethings quickly and somethings take more time. you'll find somethings they learn on their on and i mean good things.

take your time. set up a training scheduleand stay with it. don't take on any attitude that's not positive when training. when you feel impatient it's time to stop training for that session. always end your sessions on a positive note.
 

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Ok, I have a few suggestions.

1. Set down your treats. Put down your clicker. Let your dog go in his crate with a chew

and buy this book: http://www.amazon.com/Culture-Clash-Revolutionary-Understanding-Relationship/dp/1888047054

Donaldson is funny. She's insightful. She tells us how it is. And she gives us tips how to communicate with those furry creatures that we choose to share our homes with.

Every time I get so frustrated that I want to pull my hair out, I pull the book off the shelf. And there is Jean, smiling through her words and reminding us of the obvious problems. They are not like us. So we must stop thinking like US and start thinking like THEM.

2. Päivi, this is one of the major reasons that I take classes. The other owners commiserate. The trainers commiserate. And when I whine "she'll never learn ANYTHING," the trainer walks over quietly, gives my pup five commands in a row (which she executes perfectly), and looks at me and says "you taught her that. She's learning. Now back to work!"

3. Also, your dogs are both adolescents. You're the mom of teenagers. The funny thing about adolescent dogs is that they ARE learning. They're learning everything. But they're bratty teenagers. They'll never admit you're right. But then they slide into adulthood and wow, look at that -- they know everything you've been trying to teach them. One day not very long ago, I looked down at the dog at my side and wondered who is this well behaved guy? And he looked up at me (with beautiful eyes and a dashing grin) and said 'Hey, I've been here all along. "

4. Learning almost always happens BETWEEN sessions. You'll struggle. You'll struggle. You'll struggle. And then one time, your pup will get it right the FIRST time. Brains (human, canine, dolphin) are programmed to learn while we're relaxing and especially while we're sleeping. So you're thinking "OMG! How'd you do that!" and your pup is thinking, "well, I've been practicing that in my dreams for the last five nights!"

So while it's nice to end on with success, if I can't get a success with the new skill, I ask my dog for a Sit, Down, Stand, Speak! And when he does all of those in succession-- which is easy for him, and he loves to end with that big happy bark! -- I give him a big snack and that's our ending with success.

Sometimes (ok, often) brains just need downtime to process new information and learn.

If I get frustrated, he's not happy. So I try to stop before then. I switch tasks to something easy that can use repetition (can't our dogs ALWAYS work on faster sits and downs or longer down stays?); or I move to something more physical (maybe teaching a trick that requires movement, like a Spin. Or I just call it a day and I chase him around the house until we're both out of breath.

Recap:
1. Get the book.
2. Find someone to give you perspective on how far you've come and to point out that you're improving day by day.
3. There is only one way through adolescence. You have to WORK through it.
4. Learning occurs BETWEEN sessions.


5. You are not alone.
 

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Originally Posted By: Superpup...remain patient with your dogs? This is my biggest challenge in dog training, I am a very impatient person and want results NOW. How do you train your dogs and remain patient even when it looks like they are not learning anything?
I remain patient because I don't want any negativity projected on to them, so to be honest, it makes me work harder to be aware of my behavior.

I can be anctious, and I don't want to project that either, however sometimes it's impossible, but again, my dogs make we aware of my issues
(and I have some
 

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I found that when I quit worrying about competition and just sat down and observed my dogs, I became much more centered and patient as a trainer.

I spend hours everyday just watching them. Literally. I go out into the shop with all four dogs and turn them loose and let them play. I watch their movement, the way they play and what they choose to do. I respond to their requests for response but other than that I just observe. It brings a joy to our interactions that is missing with all the training and learning and insistence on perfection that tends to get in the way of relationships. I like that they're dogs. I like seeing them BE dogs. In the summer I spend hours outside, just sitting and watching them while the sun fills us with warmth.

I didn't really learn how to watch my dogs until I'd been training for years. I WATCHED them, but it wasn't the same. I didn't look for the little nuances that helped me understand when my dogs were going to do a certain behavior. I didn't just enjoy them as dogs. Training was more important than relationship, and relationship was judged by the response to training as much as anything else. When I let that go (and it wasn't easy for me - control is important and I had to say "I don't need to be in total control all the time") I found a whole new level of enjoyment in my dogs.

So when people talk about impatience in training, I tell them "go sit down and watch your dogs and just enjoy them for awhile". Because if you're getting frustrated, then something's wrong. And that's going to mess up your relationship.

By the way, I do most of my training in very short sessions, a couple times a day or so. That's actually enough to teach them all they really need to know. We do classes when we can to get in the distractions but even at class I tend to watch quite a bit (last few classes I taught so I HAD to watch .. *L*). Most of the time when I see impatience in students, it's because they have this time frame in their minds that they think they should meet. That can be totally unreasonable at times and all it does is cause trouble. So I tell them to let that go too.

The only times I'm impatient anymore are those days when I'm really sore and miserable, and dealing with Tazer gets to me. She's just got SO much energy! But that has nothing to do with training. Training is the easy part. Day-to-day living is what gets us on occasion.

Melanie and the gang in Alaska
... rambling again .. *L*
 

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It's hard to be patient. I know I spent a lot of the early months with Risa frustrated at her for not behaving. Y'know, even though it was totally my fault she wasn't getting it.


She's an incredibly smart dog and learns new behaviors fast. Even faster since starting clicker training (I've seen her generalize a behavior in a day's time). But we still have some sticky spots--mostly her fears and reactivity. There are days I just want to tear my hair out because she's still launching herself at other dogs. But I have to think back and remember the immense progress she HAS made and overlook the one or two bad days she still has. It's really difficult sometimes.

Whenever we're training and I notice she's just not getting it, I take a mental step back and ask her to do something I know she loves and then reward her for that. I usually end the session after that. There's no point in pushing her or getting to the point where I'm angry with her (for no reason, of course).

Just take a deep breath and relax. She'll get it eventually. They always do. And you'll be amazed at how far you've come when you look back at where you were.
 

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I do training in little segments 4 or 5 times a day for about 10 minutes.

I do get frustrated at puppy class because I am competitive and my last dog was always the top performer in all the classes I took. This time I have a shepherd and should also be in top spot - wrong. I was do disappointed on my last day of puppy class. She ran right past me on off leash recall and would not go into heal position. She has done this right many times in class, but on test night - no she decides to do this. I just need to work on her more.

I try my hardest to remain patient and when I feel myself turning I will end the training session, take a deep breath, look into those loving brown eyes and relax.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I just tried to post a long reply... and got some type of an error.
Anyways... thanks for all the replies. this was not a specific question, I do have my ups and downs with both of my dogs, they both have their strenghts and weaker spots, but I have noticed that the more patience I have and the more I work with them, those weak spots get stronger and stronger.
I have a very strong bond with both of my dogs and this makes it sometimes even more difficult because I dont' want to let them down because I know they would not wanna let me down.
I am also very competitive and that is one of my biggest flaws.
<span style="color: #CC0000">control is important and I had to say "I don't need to be in total control all the time</span> and this also is very very true about me!!!
 

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Yoga breaths. Lots of yoga breaths!


They also help keep you from crying when little teeth make contact!
 

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Originally Posted By: KHudakPatience is a virtue
Not always I'm a Virtue (see below)


I'm very much like Päivi, last night Deejay was driving me nuts!!
Was working on UD hand signals in the basement, for some reason he keeps taking a few steps
before the sit, down & stand when I'm on the other side of the room.
If I stand a few feet in front of him, he is fine.

OK, I tried putting boards in between him & me, have him in a stand. I walk across the room
give him the signal for sit, he takes a step up to the board & sits.
Then on the down signal he has to down sideways facing to me because he has know were to go.
The best of all, I then signal for the stand "thinking well maybe he will get a clue".
He gets up jumps the boards & does his stand. I had to pack it in for the night
 

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Discussion Starter #17
OH I know..Cody tends to do the same thing with the hand signals, not that I have been working on those that long yet..
I sometimes hope I would understand in time when it is better to stop training for the day rather than keep trying and trying and trying.
 

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I like how Melanie put things, you almost have to be on their level of understanding, understand why they do the things they do.

I love the book "The other end of the leash", that book to me has helped me alot with my dogs, and the understanding part.
 

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For me it is the journey and not the end results that matter most. Don't get me wrong, I am very competitive, but what I love is the training, bringing out what is natural in my dogs and becoming that perfect team. Maybe because of this I don't get impatient with my dogs.
 

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Hi my name is Mitch, I just got a pup, a female named Gemma. She has been with us now for 10 days. She is almost 7 weeks old. OK where do i start! She is so smart that it is scary, get this she can sit an laydown, stay on command, she also can climb stairs. She knows (no)( leave it) (easy) She is great! Also she is starting to do well with the leash (sometimes) This puppy won't come. O if you have food (maybe) she is very MOODY, she will ignore you, but yet she is so confident. An get this if she does not want to socialize, she will go up stairs, an get in her crate. ( No kidding) DID I PICK THE ALFA FEMALE. At this home I am the leader of the pack!!! the Alfa male, an she does know this. At times she is just so defiant or stubborn. When you go to let her out of her crate she will just look at you. You have to pick her up, an take her out of her crate. I have had 2 GSDs fully trained, I trained them ( hand signals the works) Plus I train my sisters Doberman. I have never seen a puppy, when you get down on your knees an call them, they run to you with excitement. She does not do this, she will just stair at you, or will ignore you, unless you have food ( an she is hungry.) At times she wants to play with us, which is great, but she does get very very aggressive. When we tell her NO! she will stop. which is good. I have never seen this kind of behavior before. This is very hard to explain all the details, but I have never seen a puppy act in this manner. We give her lots of love an effecttion too. ALL ADVICE WOULD BE APPRECIATED. thankyou Mitch.
 
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