German Shepherds Forum banner

1 - 20 of 37 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
198 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I've seen all sorts of set ups for dog transportation. What do you use? Do they just sit in the back seats? Do you have one of those police style gates that makes a barrier between the rear of a hatchback and the people compartment? Do you have a crate in the back? Do they have a seatbelt, ramp? What do you do and what do you think works the best?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,255 Posts
I have used the gate when I had a small SUV, along with a tethering system in case of an accident, or some dog warrior trying to rescue my dog. Now with a smaller car, I use the seatbelt tethers. When the pups were small, we would crate them and seatbelt the crates in. If you vehicle is large enough, I would recommend the gate and tether. The tethering seat belts work well, I just don’t like that they can’t lay down, they have to stay in a sitting position, but otherwise, very easy to get them belted in to the dog tether.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
427 Posts
My two GSDs are crated in the truck bed (covered) in RuffLand kennels. Held down with 5k lb break strength tie downs (I think). I'll probably buy stronger ones soon. My Shiba is in the back seat in the cab. There's a wire barrier between the front and back of the cab so he's not climbing over me. I'm looking at buying a Transit Connect XLT in the next few months so my set up will change. I don't like how little I can control the cooling/heating in the truck bed even when covered and would rather them in the A/C with me on long trips.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,811 Posts
I have the MIM Variogate, their barrier for the back, and their divider. That I need to install so my big dog stops with the "ma, why is he in my room?" look.

The gate is not as safe for the dogs in a crash, but safer than steel crates behind my 3 kid's heads in the event of a serious rear ending. The Variocage is nice and does have a crumple zone to make it safe for passengers in front of the dog crates..however unless you have GSDs on the smaller side even their largest double crate was too small for Valor who is 27.5 inches and 96lbs.

I'll share my reasoning and research.

If I did not have small kids in the 2nd row seating all the time and/or the big steel crates were easy to remove, I would not have gone with the gate.

Whatever you buy, check your vehicle ratings. When dog products say they are "crash tested" they are crash tested going about 35mph and they are checking for integrity of the animal inside the crate, not the other occupants of the vehicle.

For instance my Honda Pilot has the anchors rated at 45 lbs. It doesn't matter what tethers or clips you use, the anchor that is attached to the vehicle is only rated at 45lbs of weight for retaining cargo in an impact. Furthermore the 3 feet from the tailgate to the back of the 3rd row (that I keep folded down for the dogs) is a designated crumple zone. In other words in a bad rear ending, the space that remains "cargo" when the 3rd row is up is designed to crumple to absorb some impact. So between that and the rating on the anchors you can guarantee that steel impact crates will wind up on top of my children in the 2nd row if we are rear ended hard.

If I had a larger utility vehicle where the anchors have better cargo ratings, OR if it was just front seat passenger and driver in my car for the most part, I would definitely go with the impact crates. Or, if I lived with a man that could just take the steel crates in and out easily for me lol then I would have those.

The variogate is secure, but not nearly as secure as a locking steel crate. If someone had time they could definitely pull the bars apart. They would have had to be extremely determined and would have had a tranquilizer dart gun handy. Valor is not stealable.

Sorry, pics are sideways. Anyway I now have a horse stall mat in there that I got at the feed store. And I am about to put a divider in. I also have a better divider in the back now. From same company.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,317 Posts
Max is in the back seat usually sitting with my son. Poor kid if it’s a beach trip. My daughter is quick enough to jump into the front seat first. Luna is often in the back hatch either in a crate or no crate depending on truck we take out.
Dogs can get something in their eye sticking their heads out the window. I know someone riding a mortocycle a rock pelted him in the eye. He had goggles on and took them off to clean them at a light. Things fly around get kicked back or fall out of trucks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
800 Posts
Even loose in the car is too much of a risk for dog and human. No method of safe transport is 100% but confinement in a crate brings severe injury or death way down then loose in a car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Dear God I learned my lesson with Cairo. The day I got her she stepped on the seatbelt release ( she was harnessed in) and then stepped on the window down button. And jumped out the window before I left the parking lot. Yeah, I learned hard and fast to use the kid window lock. I have a Subaru Legacy but I am looking for a SUV large enough for two LARGE safety rated crates.

Honestly, I still almost want to vomit when I think about that moment. Chills in my bone marrow bad....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
259 Posts
Dear God I learned my lesson with Cairo. The day I got her she stepped on the seatbelt release ( she was harnessed in) and then stepped on the window down button. And jumped out the window before I left the parking lot. Yeah, I learned hard and fast to use the kid window lock. I have a Subaru Legacy but I am looking for a SUV large enough for two LARGE safety rated crates.

Honestly, I still almost want to vomit when I think about that moment. Chills in my bone marrow bad....
Your dog sounds like a freakin' genius that in that short amount of time she was able to unlatch her seatbelt with her foot and step on the window button to be able to jump out the window.
Incredible...

I harness/teather the dogs in the back. They have short leashes that clip onto the metal hooks in the back of my SUV seats. They don't get driven around much but I do understand the risk I take not crating them in. There is just not room for 2 crates in my Mazda CX-5. I prefer this over "throwing them in the back of the truck" … that my husband thought was a safe idea :|:surprise:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
587 Posts
Right now - 13 weeks - he is in a crate in the backseat of my sedan, it is loose. In my larger SUV, he sits on someone's lap. I'm usually driving him around alone in the sedan and it's my other pride and joy, so I don't want him chewing up the leather or seat belts. When he is an adult, he will sit loose in the backseat and stick his head out the window,
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
27 Posts
Just a PSA from experience while around the working dogs on base: If you get into an accident while your animal is loose in your vehicle, they become incredibly dangerous. It’s anywhere from 50-100lbs of dog flying from the backseat into the front seat, and many times can fly either through the windshield harming the animal, or smack into you, causing injuries or death you would not experience if your dog is properly secured in your vehicle at all times. Loose dogs can also be a distraction to the driver, actually causing the accident.

My motto: better safe than sorry. Please keep you’re animal safely secured, whether by dog harness/seat belt, crash tested and mounted crate, and the steel safety cage in an SUV combined with a crash tested and mounted crate is beneficial for both animal and owner.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
800 Posts
SeniorGSD, I can’t agree with you more. I just don’t understand people who travel short distances or long let their dogs loose in a car. I’m sure everyone has a seatbelt on at all times, why is it ok for your fur friends not be secured as well. I see so many with pets in their lap while driving, i just want to yell at them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Your dog sounds like a freakin' genius that in that short amount of time she was able to unlatch her seatbelt with her foot and step on the window button to be able to jump out the window.
Incredible...

I harness/teather the dogs in the back. They have short leashes that clip onto the metal hooks in the back of my SUV seats. They don't get driven around much but I do understand the risk I take not crating them in. There is just not room for 2 crates in my Mazda CX-5. I prefer this over "throwing them in the back of the truck" … that my husband thought was a safe idea :|:surprise:
NOPE, she was freaking out. It was like I was watching a terrible movie as she was dancing around with her harness on and tethered.. I'm 50 and it is was my fault. I should have played the tape and locked the window. I will NEVER trust seatbelt tethers as they just take a bit of pressure to release.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
587 Posts
Just a PSA from experience while around the working dogs on base: If you get into an accident while your animal is loose in your vehicle, they become incredibly dangerous. It’s anywhere from 50-100lbs of dog flying from the backseat into the front seat, and many times can fly either through the windshield harming the animal, or smack into you, causing injuries or death you would not experience if your dog is properly secured in your vehicle at all times. Loose dogs can also be a distraction to the driver, actually causing the accident.

My motto: better safe than sorry. Please keep you’re animal safely secured, whether by dog harness/seat belt, crash tested and mounted crate, and the steel safety cage in an SUV combined with a crash tested and mounted crate is beneficial for both animal and owner.
Understood, and you are completely right, but you are in the major minority. I live in suburbia and everyone I know has a dog and no one tethers, crates or belts their dogs down. Drive around on a Sunday and all you see are cute dog heads coming out of the back windows of cars. One of the joys for dogs is "Go for a ride?!?!" Been driving around with my dogs in the backseat for tens of years. I get it though and am willing to risk the very remote chance anyone would get injured even in an accident..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,317 Posts
How do you transport your dog by car? He

There is a risk of loose dogs getting injured in an accident even if they cause no distraction and well behaved. It is a risk for sure. I think seat belts are the safest. I have used them in the past the dogs are limited in getting comfortable but for a long drive maybe the safest thing. Seat belts in short drives are just as important. Seat belts have to be attached to harness and not collars. Still not full proof.

Honestly, I not crazy about my dogs in the back hatch at all. I have used wires crates and can not see how plastic and wire crates offer much protection in a rear end collision to the dogs. They would be stuck in a trap. I had just passed a rear ending collision that looked like if anyone was in the back hatch a higher endcrate would have done absolutely nothing to protect the dogs. I’m not quite sold on those. They are real nice though. I heard of a airplane crash the dog survived it was able to jump out or they threw the dog of the plane before it crashed but it survived using its natural instincts. There are I’m sure stories of crates saving dogs along with seat belts. Many people have large families, or many dogs and smaller vehicles. So are limited in how they transport their dog. I do make sure my truck is well made with heavy steel and do not mind driving older models because of this but certainly not a necessity.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
668 Posts
I drive a Chevy trailblazer and I let the back seats down for the dogs to have extra room. I also have a foam bed with a slip that fits into the space for road trips, couple that with some soft blankets and pillows and I’m jealous I have to drive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,296 Posts
I drive a Toyota Yaris, Nitro is harnessed and clicked into the seat belt. My car is too small for a crate, he takes up the whole back seat. His harness isn't crash tested, he weighs just under 100lbs, I couldn't find a harness then that was crash tested for that weight of dog. I have the windows down no more than 4 inches in winter, so he can't get his head out the window. There is enough airflow in my car with front and back windows slightly lowered that he gets great airflow. The rest of the year, I'm using the airconditioning.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,037 Posts
I am currently driving around in a little 2005 Sunfire. Shadows crate is in the back seat. Behind the passenger front seat which is pushed back all the way to wedge the crate in place. It takes up a lot of the back seat, but if I have an accident Shadow will not get loose, and will get some protection from breaking glass. In a 2003 Sunfire I fit Buds crate, which was larger, by assembling it in the car.
The crate I am using is a bit small for her, but the big one is in the trailer still, but it's better then a loose dog in the car.
For people who insist on loose dogs, I took a 120lb Malamute to the back of the head in a collision that resulted in my head contacting the windshield. When I had to have loose dogs in the vehicle my rule was lay down, stay down. I teach them that by hitting the brakes with increasing force, at low speeds, until they understand that when I put it in gear bellies better hit the seat.
 
1 - 20 of 37 Posts
Top