German Shepherds Forum banner

1 - 20 of 30 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So i should be getting a pup soon and one thing that keeps coming to mind is how do you handle off leash dogs rushing towards you? As rare as this kind of thing might happen i'd rather have a gameplan sorted out now.

At the risk of sounding paranoid or aggressive or something, im not really the gambling type and if an offleash dog any bigger than a corgi is rushing towards me and my pup(especially before she is grown) I'm not really comfortable just sitting idle to see what it wants. I obviously don't want to hurt another dog needlessly though either but maybe some sort of dog mace would be handy to keep on me for emergencies? has anyone had any experience with dog mace like this? https://www.sabrered.com/protector-dog-sprays

Or any personal suggestions or stories could help as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,230 Posts
I used to carry Spray Shield, it used to be called Direct Stop. I only ever used it on little dogs actually and it did work like a charm. There were some loose yappers trying to feed themselves to my old male who would have happily obliged and eaten them for dinner.

I have thrown rocks in desperation when a very aggressive dog busted out of her fence and was gunning for us. It worked

I also threw rocks at some pitbulls who were stalking us but it only caused them to back off marginally and they continued to stalk us in a very creepy fashion until a guy in a truck drove by and saw it and pulled over to help me. In those particular cases these were free roaming rural Florida dogs that had no owners who really cared...and in both cases I felt like my dogs' safety might really be on the line. I was alone on a rural road and I was afraid if those pits got closer to us it was gonna be bad...there were no other people. Evidently it didn't look good to that guy either since he saw it and pulled over

In more civilized areas I have put my dogs in a sit and either caught the other dog or blocked them off. If I think a dog has bad intentions I will do anything I can to stop them from getting to my dog.

I have much less commonly tried to allow a casual greeting if the dog comes in cool like he doesn't want trouble. but usually the ones who don't want trouble will back off if you tell them to, and that's my first line of defense--point a finger, advance threateningly and tell the dog to BACK OFF. A lot of time they are like whoa! okay, lady!

Also in civilized areas..assuming there was another owner around, I'll immediately call out to the other owner to catch or call their dog. If my dog's obedience is sufficient I'd leave them in a down and try to goo forward and intercept the other dog
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,962 Posts
I carry a stick. Actually an old shovel/rake handle with one end wrapped in hockey tape so it won't slip out of my hand. Usually a firm voice and a stomp will send them on their way, but given that Shadow has been attacked 5 times, I take no chances. If they don't back off willingly I will convince them.
I tried carrying a bat. Apparently that's not ok unless you also have a ball. Kongs and Frisbees don't count.

Step dad was a postie, full can of mace and the dog kept coming. Second can did nothing to stop it chewing up his arm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,758 Posts
You are supposed to step in front of your youngster and guard them so they will feel safe that you are the protective pack leader. I once ran off a pack of 5 dogs, (2 pit crosses, a bull mastif and 2 yap hounds) by grabbing a stick, raising it over my head and running at them with a roar. They ran away. What else could I do to protect myself and my whippet? It worked. I would suggest you carry a good heavy walking stick. It looks benign and is actually quite a good weapon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
208 Posts
For an aggressive unattended dog coming toward us I make a loud noise and turn my dog away from the other dog placing myself in between them. As we are walking away I keep an eye on the other dog and continue to make loud noises if necessary.

You have to make the aggressor know you are the alpha and make them understand they want no part of you.

For a new pup you have to be as protective as a momma grizzly if other dogs/animals are coming at you aggressively
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
4,501 Posts
It depends on how the other dog approaches. The first thing I have to do is try to stay calm and breath slowly. Getting stressed out is a huge mistake. If I move calmly as if the other dog doesn't matter, and the other dog appears calm, usually things go all right.

I prefer to avoid off leash dogs all together and if I see them first, I'll change course. When I walk through the burbs, the loose dogs are usually ones where someone is working in the garage or doing some yard work on a nice quiet day and the dog is hanging out with them. They owners suddenly change their mind about it when they see their buddy coming towards one or two German Shepherds.

Yesterday I had a little lapdog come rushing from a yard, across the street (thank God no traffic) and straight over to bark at my big-boy's face! I had both dogs with me and I had no time to think (oh the better ideas that came to me after wards) All I could do was use leash pressure to keep my boy's head from reaching that stupid little dog. My gal-dog basically tried her best to keep out of the way. The owner of the dog was brave enough to scoop up her insane little guy. It appears that my dog gave the message "I suffer no fools", I don't think the little rascal got hurt.

As far as tools, when I had my big-boy and another male GSD of the same age was frequently roaming free, I carried a golf umbrella. Popping it open surprises the dogs but not for but a moment...shortly afterwards you have two dogs, a leash and a huge umbrella making things very awkward.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
In my country you can't carry anything,even a walking stick is a bad idea unless you can later prove that you need it to walk.

Stamping while making a deep noise works sometimes,as does standing on the other dog's foot if it comes to that, I often walk by a river and if I think it's being too aggressive I've teeped,pushed and thrown uncontrolled dogs in there before now and that's always changed their minds without any damage being done.

It could even be worth carrying a break stick if it's legal there.

Unfortunately summer brings out the fair weather dog walkers and their uncontrolled and often aggressive mutts,so the it's always better to try and avoid being wherever they're likely to be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,809 Posts
So i should be getting a pup soon and one thing that keeps coming to mind is how do you handle off leash dogs rushing towards you? As rare as this kind of thing might happen i'd rather have a gameplan sorted out now.

At the risk of sounding paranoid or aggressive or something, im not really the gambling type and if an offleash dog any bigger than a corgi is rushing towards me and my pup(especially before she is grown) I'm not really comfortable just sitting idle to see what it wants. I obviously don't want to hurt another dog needlessly though either but maybe some sort of dog mace would be handy to keep on me for emergencies? has anyone had any experience with dog mace like this? https://www.sabrered.com/protector-dog-sprays

Or any personal suggestions or stories could help as well.
Start paying attention to your neighborhood and the routes you will be walking. Note which houses have dogs and the temperaments of the dog and the owners. The areas where there tends to be off leash dogs. do some pre pup walking and observation homework. That way, you can pick the routes that are the safest and the ones to avoid. Sharpen your observational skills. Go through what if scenarios in your head and visualize escape plans within the area. I can't tell you how many times that last 2 sentences has kept me and my boy safe.

Don't obsess over it, just be prepared. It adds to the confidence.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,421 Posts
So i should be getting a pup soon and one thing that keeps coming to mind is how do you handle off leash dogs rushing towards you? As rare as this kind of thing might happen i'd rather have a gameplan sorted out now.

At the risk of sounding paranoid or aggressive or something, im not really the gambling type and if an offleash dog any bigger than a corgi is rushing towards me and my pup(especially before she is grown) I'm not really comfortable just sitting idle to see what it wants. I obviously don't want to hurt another dog needlessly though either but maybe some sort of dog mace would be handy to keep on me for emergencies? has anyone had any experience with dog mace like this? https://www.sabrered.com/protector-dog-sprays

Or any personal suggestions or stories could help as well.
I hate loose dogs charging up to mine, but I don't have a set plan. I'm not saying do any of these, but I've hit dogs with my leash, I've kicked dogs, I've grabbed them and made their owners leash them, I've called them to me to pet them, I've let mine go run with them. I've smacked mine for being a jerk. My only point is, don't go out thinking the worst is going to happen, because you'll be surprised at how much you can influence what actually happens when you're anticipating it, and concentrate on your dogs obedience and control. You'll also be surprised at how much that can create an indifference in your dog that diffuses a lot of this stuff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,787 Posts
That's so true. How we act can really influence the interactions. A shepherd will always have half an ear/eye on his owner to see how he/she is reacting to a situation.

I was out with all my dogs, in the dark of winter's night to run on a bike trail in a remote area near the border. A loose pointer X came out of nowhere and decided to join us. My first impulse was to call my dogs in, but I noticed that the interaction was going just fine without my interference. The young pointer X was submissive and perfectly social, and all my dogs gave him a sniff and then were fine with him running with us. The dog joined my pack for the run, and then disappeared. Later, I discovered he belonged to a Canadian man who had lost him overnight- the dog was found based on where I last saw him and re-united with his owner. Really nice dog... if nobody had turned up I would have considered keeping him because of his super easy-going temperament, so different from my, well, higher-maintenance shepherds.

Anyway, this interaction brought home to me that owner interference can be a huge issue. Had the incoming dog been a different breed or type, or behaved differently I certainly would have intervened immediately, but the vast majority of dogs that I've met have been social or full of false bravado. The only one that I felt truly meant to do harm to mine, was a fighting breed that I ran off in a fit of pure rage- I didn't have any weapon on me and just used voice and body language. I vowed my wonderful, old dog was NOT going to end up dead or hurt. I owed that to him.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,255 Posts
Yes so true I believe how you act gives the red or green light for your dog to follow suit. This how gsd remind me much of horses. This is the season for many charging loose dogs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
208 Posts
Start paying attention to your neighborhood and the routes you will be walking. Note which houses have dogs and the temperaments of the dog and the owners. The areas where there tends to be off leash dogs. do some pre pup walking and observation homework. That way, you can pick the routes that are the safest and the ones to avoid. Sharpen your observational skills. Go through what if scenarios in your head and visualize escape plans within the area. I can't tell you how many times that last 2 sentences has kept me and my boy safe.

Don't obsess over it, just be prepared. It adds to the confidence.
When pre pup walking and you come across a yard where a dog begins to bark stand there a bit to see if the dog does anything more than just bark. I've got some dogs in my neighborhood that will pounce against the fence or even try to climb over.

I also had one basset hound two houses down that tore through my neighbors fence then my fence and was trying to get to the dog behind me. At the time we only had the Aussie Shep and she was inside at the time - thank goodness. (adding - those have neighbors have moved away - which is good because I never thought they were good dog owners)

Maintain a calm, confident, assertive and alert energy about yourself. Your dog and other dogs will pick up on that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,149 Posts
In my country you can't carry anything,even a walking stick is a bad idea unless you can later prove that you need it to walk.

Stamping while making a deep noise works sometimes,as does standing on the other dog's foot if it comes to that, I often walk by a river and if I think it's being too aggressive I've teeped,pushed and thrown uncontrolled dogs in there before now and that's always changed their minds without any damage being done.

It could even be worth carrying a break stick if it's legal there.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KfMVH4wY5Pg

Unfortunately summer brings out the fair weather dog walkers and their uncontrolled and often aggressive mutts,so the it's always better to try and avoid being wherever they're likely to be.
Digs where do you live that even walking sticks aren't allowed? :surprise:

I would get between the two dogs, and yell, stamp my feet. I also sometimes carry a walnut hiking staff.

I have kicked dogs to break up fights, when I got caught without a stick. Yes, there's a risk of getting bitten, but better a foot or ankle than a hand!

I don't think break sticks are illegal, at least not here in Canada. Most people wouldn't know what they were. Only problem is I've never had one handy when I really needed one!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,758 Posts
[/quote]In my country you can't carry anything,even a walking stick is a bad idea unless you can later prove that you need it to walk.


If I lived in England I think I would suddenly develop a limp :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
247 Posts
I'm living in Asia with overwhelming amount of stray and unattended dogs.

Every single day we take two walks and ever single walk atleast 3 times some dog(s) charged at my 6 months old girl (now its less common as mayority of dogs here know us and know I will have none of it). I will step between, face the dog, look in the eyes. If he doesn't back out, I will take step towards him. So far this never failed me and dogs every single time changed it mind about going closer.

It works with our village dogs 100%. But don't know if you should try it with some angry pitbull. As you're basically challenging him. Probably good way how to get attacked if you misjudge a dog. But it works on local strays.

I don't recommended doing it my way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
Digs where do you live that even walking sticks aren't allowed? :surprise:

I would get between the two dogs, and yell, stamp my feet. I also sometimes carry a walnut hiking staff.

I have kicked dogs to break up fights, when I got caught without a stick. Yes, there's a risk of getting bitten, but better a foot or ankle than a hand!

I don't think break sticks are illegal, at least not here in Canada. Most people wouldn't know what they were. Only problem is I've never had one handy when I really needed one!


A country where a 78 year old old pensioner gets arrested after being attacked by and then stabbing a burglar with his own screwdriver and is also currently trying to outright ban all knives.

Walking sticks aren't illegal,but get caught hitting someone (or someone's dog) with one and the police will probably say it's an offensive weapon unless you have a legitimate reason for having it i.e you've just bought it and are carrying it home or need it to walk with.

When I had dogs that justified it I'd leave a few break sticks around the yard and carry one on walks (on private land) just in case.
But they were for my own dogs if any uncontrolled mutt tried it with them or me,I miss those dogs at times like the other day when my pup was attacked.

Isn't it strange how people seem to be able to get control of their untrained off-lead dog if it's eyeing up a 50 pound bull breed,but are unable to when it's a little puppy or fufu breed?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
I hate loose dogs charging up to mine, but I don't have a set plan. I'm not saying do any of these, but I've hit dogs with my leash, I've kicked dogs, I've grabbed them and made their owners leash them, I've called them to me to pet them, I've let mine go run with them. I've smacked mine for being a jerk. My only point is, don't go out thinking the worst is going to happen, because you'll be surprised at how much you can influence what actually happens when you're anticipating it, and concentrate on your dogs obedience and control. You'll also be surprised at how much that can create an indifference in your dog that diffuses a lot of this stuff.
this is def good advice to keep in mind, i appreciate it. I tend to overthink things and be a bit paranoid by nature, which can be a good and bad thing.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
4,501 Posts
I used to see this lady jogging while carrying a bat where we used to live - LOL
In my town it is common to see people doing their personal walks / jogs with a walking stick or golf club or something. I prefer to have my dogs. Carrying the extra walking stick was just one more thing to hold. Thank goodness so far none of the loose dogs were actually aggressive, except for the little insane ones.
 
1 - 20 of 30 Posts
Top