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Discussion Starter #1
How do you know if you're capable of owning a dog?

Is it when you've grown up with a dog and have had family/parents that have taught you how to train and raise a dog?

Is it when you're financially stable?

Is it a combination of circumstances?

Is it simply when you've a passion/interest/love for them?

Or do you not know until you've attempted to own a dog?

With all the problems I have (in MY mind at least) do you think I shouldn't own my two?

Honestly...
 

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Please stop doubting yourself so much. I know that could be easier said than done, but no one is perfect. Maybe you didn't grow up with dogs but you like them and want them you seem to try to care for them more than a lot of people I know so than why should you not have them.
 

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Please stop doubting yourself so much. I know that could be easier said than done, but no one is perfect. Maybe you didn't grow up with dogs but you like them and want them you seem to try to care for them more than a lot of people I know so than why should you not have them.
I 100% agree with this.
 

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As long as you love them and care for them then that's all that matters. I have moments of panic about my puppy as he's my sole responsibility and relies on me completely. There's a great quote by John Grogan - “A dog doesn't care if you're rich or poor, educated or illiterate, clever or dull. Give him your heart and he will give you his.”



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As long as you love them and care for them then that's all that matters. I have moments of panic about my puppy as he's my sole responsibility and relies on me completely. There's a great quote by John Grogan - “A dog doesn't care if you're rich or poor, educated or illiterate, clever or dull. Give him your heart and he will give you his.”
Couldn't agree more, basic needs are easy to meet. Shelter, exercise, food, water, and attention is all they ask for. Everything else is just gravy on top of meat to them, it's a treat not essential :)
 

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time ,money, and love that's all your dogs need. if they wag their tails and lick you to death. your doing okay. :)
 

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As long as you love them and care for them then that's all that matters. I have moments of panic about my puppy as he's my sole responsibility and relies on me completely. There's a great quote by John Grogan - “A dog doesn't care if you're rich or poor, educated or illiterate, clever or dull. Give him your heart and he will give you his.”
As far as I'm concerned, this pretty much says it all!!!
 

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I agree with everyone. As long as they are properly cared for and loved, no reason to doubt how worthy you are of owning such magnificent beasts. ;)
 

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I was someone who doubted I could own a dog. I was enjoying my carefree lifestyle. It was not until in my 40s that I thought about getting a dog. I had to overcome the worry that my house would be dirty and stinky with a dog. That dog hair would get all over anything that I own.

You are ready for a dog when you are ready to stop being selfish and focused on non-important thing in the scheme of it all. After about 3 years of worrying and wondering, God lined it up so that Fiona would come into my life. Thank You God!

So even if you have problems, mine are physical, you should not worry that it means you should not have a dog. God forbid, if I lost my job and could not afford much, Fiona would eat before I ate. So as long as you can love your dogs and care for them, keep them and tell that little devil on your shoulder who says you should not, to shut up. :)


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Can you spend time with your dog on exercise every day and can you keep it with you? A dog is a lot of work.

If you like a laid back lifestyle, don't have pets! Even cats require some level of play and fussing with and they need to be fed and cleaned after.

Pet ownership is a privilege and responsibility. You'll be looking after an animal for maybe 20 years. That's a long time and it something that needs careful consideration and owning a dog in particular, shouldn't be approached lightly.
 

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You don't know, you just do, and do it the best you can. The amount of money I spent on Zoey was/is ridiculous, FYI I adopted her and the first year racked up over $1500 in training alone, combine that with vet bills, food, installing a fence for her to run free... My mind boggles just thinking about it! I wasn't ready, especially being 25 and the lifestyle I live. Owning her made me put my big boy pants on, and I couldn't be happier.

Don't doubt yourself...
 

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Also.....I know a lot of dog owners that feed there dog twice a day and that's it. No walks, no exercise, nothing. I don't condone it but if these people are capable of "owning a dog" why shouldn't you?
 

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I have been struggling with that choice for a bit of time, my best reason to have a dog is that I was happy when had dogs. If you have the money to pay their bills and time to spend go for it. But it is still a serious decision.
 

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Would you be happier if you released yourself from the burden of owning these dogs?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Would you be happier if you released yourself from the burden of owning these dogs?
I don't think so...but honestly I do think about rehoming Zeeva sometimes. The constant worry about if she found a suitable home would be unnerving though. Plus I wouldn't have anything to do without them. Wouldn't even get out of bed or get any exercise...nothing...my life revolves around them. Can I give that up and be happier? I don't know. Most likely not. If I can find something to fill that void...maybe. But I think I love them too much.

I'd be happier if they could tell me they're ok...that's what gets me most. If I knew that despite the lack of a trainer or being inside for now that they're ok. That without me sometimes, they're ok...AND I wish they knew that the situation we're in is temporary...
 

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I don't think so...but honestly I do think about rehoming Zeeva sometimes. The constant worry about if she found a suitable home would be unnerving though. Plus I wouldn't have anything to do without them. Wouldn't even get out of bed or get any exercise...nothing...my life revolves around them. Can I give that up and be happier? I don't know. Most likely not. If I can find something to fill that void...maybe. But I think I love them too much.

I'd be happier if they could tell me they're ok...that's what gets me most. If I knew that despite the lack of a trainer or being inside for now that they're ok. That without me sometimes, they're ok...AND I wish they knew that the situation we're in is temporary...
Fortunately, this is one thing you don't need to be worrying about. Dogs live in the moment. They don't reflect upon their situation and compare it to times before or times after. For dogs, every situation is temporary :)

If they are not being starved, or beaten, or neglected at the moment, they are just peachy. Would they rather be outside running around at the moment...well, dogs are also selfishly driven, so maybe. But are they going to be thinking about that a week from now and holding it against you? Absolutely Not!

Zeeva, since your dogs aren't going to hold this temporary situation against you, why do it to yourself? You're only engaging your anxiety :( I think it's time for you to redirect, and find something positive to focus on. What are you grateful for today?
 

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I actually planned for a dog. I know I could not have one in my 20's or 30's, our business was too busy and hectic and I had to deal with many health and medical issues with one of my children. When the health issues stabilized, my kids were in there teens and I was having more time to myself. So what I did was started walking by myself in the morning and evening to see if I had the energy and desire to do this with a dog. At that time my husband did not want a dog, but then we had some serious crime/security issues: people shooting up drugs and sleeping behind our condo unit. I was home alone a lot and my husband agreed that a dog would make him feel better while I was at home.

So for me it was time and finances. The love was always there since I was a little girl. (my parents were bad examples of dog owners, so growing up with a dog did not make me a better owner as an adult). I got my own dog at 15 yrs old and showed my family how to be with a dog.
 

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If you think the stress of owning two dogs is the issue with you, can you try to spend time with one dog at a time? Walking them separately, maybe going in the car separately, playing different games with each one.

I had twins (humans) and just because I had two did not mean they always needed to be together. Yes it was easier, but they have two different personalities. Since I'm the active one, I would take one daughter out ice skating or something and my husband liked to stay home with the other, he cooked soup and sewed them some capes. They enjoyed being separate once in a while. Also you can change the way you think, don't think of your dogs as a unit, you can say, I have one dog that likes to hunt and one dog that likes to sleep or whatever, that might help.
 

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If you think the stress of owning two dogs is the issue with you, can you try to spend time with one dog at a time? Walking them separately, maybe going in the car separately, playing different games with each one.

I had twins (humans) and just because I had two did not mean they always needed to be together. Yes it was easier, but they have two different personalities. Since I'm the active one, I would take one daughter out ice skating or something and my husband liked to stay home with the other, he cooked soup and sewed them some capes. They enjoyed being separate once in a while. Also you can change the way you think, don't think of your dogs as a unit, you can say, I have one dog that likes to hunt and one dog that likes to sleep or whatever, that might help.
I really like this advice. I used to think if I took one of my dogs somewhere, I had to take all three. Or if I was playing with one outside, it was only "fair" to let the other two outside, as well.

Well, you know what? It is just plain Crazy stressful with multiple dogs around all the time. And I finally read in one of Patricia McConnell's books that I was just being silly projecting that onto my dogs.

Now, I take whoever is most suitable. And if someone is being willful and I have to keep calling them to me when we're outside, in the house they go for a little while. This is a very recent change in attitude on my part, but I would swear that even the dogs appreciate it. And I think that instead of feeling left out, they are more rewarded by the individualized one-on-one attention :D That was something poor Lillian hadn't had since I brought the other two home over a year ago. Man, she sure has been patient with me!
 
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