German Shepherds Forum banner

21 - 24 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
849 Posts
E-collars are absolutely not needed for anything and I could spam you with studies showing how bad they are. I have a huge bucovina shepherd and a working line GSD and I walk both with police style harnesses, not even collars. Never used prongs, e-collars, anything. They are both well behaved and don't react to other dogs unless they literally attack them (in that case they are free to), which pretty much never happens cause not many dogs have the balls to attack an 86 cm to withers, 70-80 kg dog. And if I could train my bucovina shepherd to walk calmly on a loose leash and ignore everything without beating him, shocking him or putting nails in his neck, you can train any dog to do so. To understand: bucovinas are similar in temperament (and size) to caucasian shepherds. Ultra protective, high natural aggressiveness, dominance, really high same sex aggression. All around much more hardcore and difficult in every way compared to GSDs. And my GSD is also pretty high prey and defence drive.

P.S. trained a number of other breeds and dogs using the same methods as well, gave mine as an example cause they are higher difficulty breeds than labs, goldens and viszlas.
I love how people think what works for their dog will work for others. Do those studies take into account that many people use the e-collar wrong?

My dog has been attacked and charged by multiple dogs. People in a Florida don’t think they need leashes. I’ve raised multiple dogs without an Ecollar. My current 16 year old has never had anything more than a buckle collar.

When I took my dog to a board and train, they couldn’t even get a collar on him without a bitesuit. He didn’t like strangers touching him. An ecollar was not as personal to my dog vs a stranger correcting him on a leash. He needed trust built. He came back to me a different dog. He’s not scared or shy of the ecollar. Heck, I haven’t really had to use it. Isn’t that a better quality of life for my dog for 5 weeks of training?

Either way, I’m happy with the results. Peace.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #22
@Canto how old is your dog and is he food motivated?
He's 13 months and can take the food or leave it.

I was just making this post because he gave that one bark and I didn't want things to escalate, but he hasn't barked since.
I'm worried because I take him out about 7-10 times a day (including potty breaks) and being exposed to reactive dogs everyday might cause him to be reactive himself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
227 Posts
If you want to break the behavior chain you've created you need to change your stimulus first. You are waiting for your dog to react, then you correct, then wait for correct behavior, then reward. You need to replace the behavior with clear direction and expectations. My dogs learn the "leave it" command early. This also means ignore on walks when suicidal deer and squirrels run out. My current female is a 100lb Central Asian Shepherd that I walk flat collar. I'm a 145lb woman. We have lots of reactive dogs. Her natural instant is to challenge and not back down.

When we see a hyperstimulated dog she is told "leave it" as we give distance so the other dog can't lunge out and reach her. If she leaves it she gets verbal reinforcement of "good leave it" as we go by. If I see her tense up she gets a stronger "leave it." Then verbal reinforcement if she complies. Now make no mistake, she is watching that dog silently and between it and me as we pass, but she is undercontrol and following my command.

You are setting the expectation of behavior from the beginning and establishing you have control over what will happen. It also establishes who your dog can interact with. When Storm sees a dog friend she's told "go play" and she knows it's all good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #24
If you want to break the behavior chain you've created you need to change your stimulus first. You are waiting for your dog to react, then you correct, then wait for correct behavior, then reward. You need to replace the behavior with clear direction and expectations. My dogs learn the "leave it" command early. This also means ignore on walks when suicidal deer and squirrels run out. My current female is a 100lb Central Asian Shepherd that I walk flat collar. I'm a 145lb woman. We have lots of reactive dogs. Her natural instant is to challenge and not back down.

When we see a hyperstimulated dog she is told "leave it" as we give distance so the other dog can't lunge out and reach her. If she leaves it she gets verbal reinforcement of "good leave it" as we go by. If I see her tense up she gets a stronger "leave it." Then verbal reinforcement if she complies. Now make no mistake, she is watching that dog silently and between it and me as we pass, but she is undercontrol and following my command.

You are setting the expectation of behavior from the beginning and establishing you have control over what will happen. It also establishes who your dog can interact with. When Storm sees a dog friend she's told "go play" and she knows it's all good.
That's a really good point and perspective! I'll need to do this for more aspects of his life. Thank you!
 
21 - 24 of 24 Posts
Top