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I brush my dogs' teeth and she has no problems with gum disease, etc., but what steps can I take to minimize her teeth wear over her lifetime?

Let's face it, she loves to chew toys, etc., and I'm guessing that all of this contributes to the cumulative wearing of her teeth. There must be some "teeth friendly" toys for GSDs ("Mals"), etc., for dogs that like to chew on toys, aren't there?

What steps (i.e., food, nutritional supplements, toys, etc.) do you take to try an ensure a full set healthy teeth for their lifetime?

Craig
 

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No recreational bones, no tennis balls. If you feed kibble, a turkey neck once a week is a good dental cleaning.
 

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soft, raw, natural bones... necks are great as mentioned above. i used to boast about how great antlers were and how my dog never had issues for years... well my luck eventually ran out and we’re dealing with some mild fractures now.
 
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Thank you both!

:)

I found a copy of an archived article that looks credible written by the American Veterinary Dental Society (AVDS - Worn Teeth Information Page - Dog Teeth Health - Cat Teeth Health) that says, ..."The most common is pruritis (itching and chewing), because hair is very abrasive. This will commonly cause severe wearing of the incisors, although the canines can also be affected. This can progress all the way to the gumline, and occasionally below. Dogs that chew on tennis balls or other abrasive toys (think of tennis ball as a scoring pad), will often wear their smaller front cheek teeth (premolars), and the back aspect of the canines. This abrasion won’t do much over the course of one day, but chewing every day for years can cause significant wear."...

Surely there are nutritional supplements that can strengthen bones (and teeth) for our dogs (and us!)?

Craig
 

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Mine gets a Denta-stik or greenie dental chew every day. So far I don't let her chew on things that might break her teeth (two of my friends' dogs broke their carnassials chewing bones within the last couple years...). I don't brush her teeth. Call me old-fashioned but....my childhood dog never once had his teeth brushed and he lived to be 16 (big dog).

She does like tennis balls and prefers them over ChuckIts. I only let her chew on them when we're playing outside and it never lasts long so...hopefully won't amount to much wear.

I will have to check out the turkey neck thing...
 

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I need to find something for my dogs. They are on limited diets, both different, so I can’t give them meat bones or other biscuits. The vet said to brush their teeth. One had a cleaning a year ago and needs another one, so I need to do something.
 

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I wonder if chewing can become addictive to dogs. I have never given them chew bones after teething was complete besides a bully sick once in a while. Didn't see any problems with that.
 

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My dog's teeth stay clean by daily brushing and a few bully sticks a week. Unfortunately, my 5 y/o is showing some real wear on his teeth. He ALWAYS has a ball in his mouth. They are rubber but I don't think it matters. He loves to chew them. His canines are wearing. I've tried picking up all the toys but he always has one stashed somewhere. I've got to try harder because I don't think he can keep wearing them at the rate he's going.

My old girl had worn hers down a lot but we were able to stop the worst of it by stopping the jolly balls.
 

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Even with regular natural chews, many kibble fed dogs may need a veterinary dental cleaning about every 3 years (without the chews, it's likely to be needed annually after about age 3). My old dogs still have pretty good teeth, but they've been chewers and have gotten a cleaning once in a long while. I try to schedule the dental cleaning for when they have to go under anesthesia for some other reason. It's rarely something we have to do on its own.

If you have an adult dog, lift up the lip to examine the back molars. If you see brown gunk, that's tartar. It starts to form around year 3 on most kibble-fed dogs.
 

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With previous dogs who were not raw fed, I cleaned them myself with older scalers that I got from my own dentist. One of them never built up tartar, because of his type of saliva that fought bacteria, according to the vet. 🤷‍♀️
 
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