German Shepherds Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys, I have a really frustrating problem that I just can't seem to solve without getting snapped at. My GSD has been very mouthy all his life and I've been dealing with this bad habit by taking him out the room on the leash and ignoring him till he's calm (as recommended on 'Its me or the dog'). It seems to be working lovely and I'm so proud of him. There is a downside though, my dad (I'm 18 years old) is setting back his training by using alpha roles, smacking on the nose, pinning him down and shoving his fist into his mouth. I am livid at the fact he uses these methods and it only makes his mouthing more frequent, harder and now he's beginning to curl back his lip sometimes. My dad and other family members then complain he's not any better, we should have never got him ect. I try to explain positive reinforcement methods work best with him and all I get it insults from 'Don't talk to me like that you little brat, thinking you know everything. I'll do it my way!' :( How do I explain this to my dad he is infact making my boy worse without being scared to say anything?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27,251 Posts
I would limit your dogs exposure to your family members and take control of every situation so you are the one redirecting your puppy. They are only making his confidence level drop and eventually he'll have none left.
He's going to become a fear biter....they are setting him up for failure.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,941 Posts
This is a very bad situation to be in. Your dad is setting your dog up to fail. He will get bit, and the dog (and you) will have to pay the price for it.

I'd move out as soon as possible, and take my dog with me. Until then, do everything you can to keep your dog away from your father. Crate him when you are not there to supervise. Arrange your schedule so you are the only one feeding, walking, pottying the dog.

You probably won't be able to do or say anything to change your father's behaviour and point of view, so I would focus on keeping your dog safe and setting him up for success.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,157 Posts
I agree you need to keep your dog away from your father. Especially if he's using outdated methods that prove to be dangerous for those involved. If the dog is YOURS, they need to listen to and respect your desires for training. Also agree that first chance you get to move out and take your dog, do it. Having him in that environment is not going to do anything but make your job more difficult and cause the dog to have continued problems down the road that are hard to correct.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
I'm so sorry you are in this position. First, I am writing as a mother. As an 18 year old you have your life ahead of you. I don't know where you are in your academics; in college, will be starting college soon or working towards a trade. Regardless, please don't move out for the sake of the dog. I know it sounds mean hearted and selfish, but you have to think about your goals and aspirations first, you truly have so much to look forward to. Work toward having the life you want first. I know it won't be the same dog but you can get another dog you can love and care for as you see fit later in life. You are correct, your father is creating a precarious situation in your household and it doesn't sound as though it will change. Perhaps, and I write this as a last choice, you can look into rehoming the dog before its too late. I wish all works out well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,242 Posts
Can you keep the dog tethered to you (and inaccessible to some of the other family members) when you are home with them and in the same room? Make sure to give the dog plenty of exercise so that it may settle better in the house and hopefully nap or play quietly with some mental toys (treat kongs and the like). Maybe crate the dog in your room if you're not able to keep him beside you. It's a tough situation and I would be very upset too if it were me.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
79 Posts
When I was 8 years old my parents purchased a GSD for us kids. Although, they claimed the puppy was ours they assumed 100% of the responsibilities raising the dog (financially and duty wise). More importantly they interacted with the dog more then we did as we had school and my mom was a stay at home mother. That was almost 30 years ago. Back then training approaches were different. My parents used a rolled up news paper to correct the dog. Mother used to bang pots and pans to adjust the dog to noise and etc. They also went together to obedience classes. That GSD was named “Sport” and turned out to be an incredible dog in addition an excellent family member for 13 years. However, in my opinion training approaches, concepts and ideas have advanced and today’s concepts are more suitable for a broader spectrum of raising dogs with different temperaments and sensitivity.

Reality is you are living in your parent’s house that means you will probably have to follow their rules. The issue is you disagree with how your father is correcting the dog and in my opinion for good reason. You are probably also aware that they will be interacting with the dog when you are unavailable for school, work and other social reasons. When dogs are puppies their early interaction and environment will have profound impact on the dog as it matures and he will be in your life for many years to come. Now that I am in my late thirties, independent and own a GSD puppy my parents, in late 60s, still want to correct the puppy in the manner they see most fit when visiting them. They don’t because the responsibility is solely mine. In your situation this may not be as easy therefore I recommend the following:

Explain to your parents how you want to raise the dog and your reasons. More importantly there is a wealth of information on the Internet for not alpha rolling a dog and etc. An abundance of information can be found on “positive only training websites and sites that don't believe in dog dominance”. I would print this information and ask your parents to read it. If they refuse leave it out in convenient places so they may read it (i.e bedroom, bathroom and etc.) Although, I do disagrree with some of this literature the point is you are attempting to educate your parents and avoid harsh corrections. For example the Monks of New Skete revised their book from the 70s and they no longer recommend alpha rolls. But keep in mind if you read the book they do recommend also correcting dogs.

I think printing out information will be your best approach for your current situation in attempt to educate your parents. Of course the best option would be to assume full responsibility of yourself and the dog but that would require financial independence and the time necessary to raise the dog with the methods you see fit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thankyou for all your replies and apologies for my late one! :)

Moving out is not an option for me because I have no money/savings as I have not been able to hold down a job yet and I barely get 'pocket money'. We (the family) need to address my dad's behaviour in other areas, so we plan to sit down and talk about various things that he could do to help. It's been a rough couple of years for me and I can't help but blame myself for my dogs set backs because I'm not in the right mindset. It seems as I'm mentally getting stronger, the dog is a lot more responsive and behaving accordingly. I agree though, I will keep the dog with me at all times and provide my dad with some positive reinforcement information. Maybe he needs some too eh? :p

x
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top