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Sometimes she takes a while to come or reluctantly sits, like she is stubborn.

I have phased out treats now as I know she knows what the commands mean. I have tried adding in an occasional treat but it's not doing the trick.

I always give the command in a nice tone as opposed to firm and make sure she does it every time, so she doesn't think she can get away without following it.

Any ideas to help?
 

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How old is your dog?
 

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How old is your dog?
Ditto, and how long have you been training each of the skills that she "knows"?

I doubt stubbornness has anything to do with it, and it's usually not productive to think that way. Instead, think about reasons why she may not be willingly complying - Too distracted? The environment is more interesting than you are? Not enough motivation? The commands haven't been fully generalized to new situations and/or places, or proofed for distractions? The rate of reinforcement wasn't high enough for long enough, or you went from a high rate to a low or zero rate without transitioning with a random rate of reinforcement for a sufficient period of time?

As you can see, these possibilities are all about training, and how clear and consistent the process has been. "Stubborn" implies that it's the dog's fault, and takes the responsibility off the owner.
 

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Ditto, and how long have you been training each of the skills that she "knows"?

I doubt stubbornness has anything to do with it, and it's usually not productive to think that way. Instead, think about reasons why she may not be willingly complying - Too distracted? The environment is more interesting than you are? Not enough motivation? The commands haven't been fully generalized to new situations and/or places, or proofed for distractions? The rate of reinforcement wasn't high enough for long enough, or you went from a high rate to a low or zero rate without transitioning with a random rate of reinforcement for a sufficient period of time?

As you can see, these possibilities are all about training, and how clear and consistent the process has been. "Stubborn" implies that it's the dog's fault, and takes the responsibility off the owner.
Agreed, I am often guilty of expecting too much from my dog too soon. It has never been the dogs fault.
 

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I'm with the others, it's not 'stubborn' you are seeing.

One of the things we forget when training properly with toys/treats is we shouldn't go from ALL treats to ZERO treats once they seem to have learned the commands.

There is a middle stage of random/variable reinforcement we tend to leave out that screws up our pups cause in their mind they went from clear understanding and fast rewards to confirm the understanding. To now getting NO real rewards ever! If verbals were the exact same 'paycheck' then you'd be getting the exact same responses.

A Word About Treats - Canine Connection LLC

Intermittent Reinforcement Building Your Dog Training Foundation : Dog Obedience Training Blog

Video: How to Mark Random Reinforcement in Basic Dog Training | eHow.com
 

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How old is your pup? At some point you can add corrects ( if you are comfortable with them, know how to use them, and the dog is old enough). around 4-5 months I introduced the e-collar into our OB work and when she has that thing on she is pretty quick to follow commands. If she is still a very young puppy just keep having fun and re-enforcing that foundation.
 
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