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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
From the list below, which home remedies are considered myths (and potentially dangerous) or facts when giving to our lovely GSD?

Myths: it does not provide any benefits or is dangerous, not good to be given to dogs at all as it is poisoneous

Facts: benefits are visible (what are the uses/benefits?), it works as intended and is safe for dogs


I will provide my feedback first:
  1. 1 clove garlic/day - MYTH -I tried one day, cut it in small pieces and mixed with my dog's food, Igor did not like that at all and threw up 30 min after eating
  2. 1 tablet of human vitamin C 500 mg/day - have not tried yet, heard is good for inflamtions as it is an antioxidant
  3. 2 capsules of human cod oil liver/day - FACT - gave to him before in lieu of oil fish and benefits were visible on his fur
  4. oil fish with mint flavor - MYTH - i think my dog got allergic to the mint and did not see the benefit as noticeable in the human cod oil liver
  5. organic apple cidar vinegar - FACT - have not tried yet but used white vinegar with warn water to clean his ears
  6. brown rice with some onions in - i have given to him before but I tried to remove the onions before and later decided to make it w/o onions for us as well to so he could eat it as is, not sure if rice should be given often or once in a blue moon
  7. apples - he does not seem to like it
  8. greek yogurt - he loves greek yogurt!
  9. papaya - he LOVES papaya!
  10. cantaloupe/melon - he likes melons!
  11. carrots - he did not like that much
  12. milk - he would drink but he would have diarrhea or very soft stool
  13. greenies (not human but would be good to know) - he LOVES greenies but I am concerned about some of its non natural ingredients
Any others?
What would you recommend and what benefit/results have you seen?
What would you not recommend as a big "no-no"?
 

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No onions and I think Greek yogurt is not good for them, it has higher something then regular yogurt(I can't remember what right now). Apple Cider Vinegar is good for the PH in the pee, so it doesn't turn grass brown. Apples with no seeds, seeds are poisonous. Stay away from milk.
 

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I don't think you can base Fact/Myth off your own experiences. As far as the cod liver oil capsules, be careful with those. That is loaded with Vitamin A which is not water soluble and can lead to toxicity.

Important Cod Liver Oil Update
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the info, especially the one about cod liver oil, kind of scary...i have not given that to Igor in years so I should be safe there, I was giving him fish oil with mint flavor but I guess he did not like that much and maybe gave him some respiratory allergy.

As far as greek yogurt, I would really like to hear more about it. We all know about the positive effects of probiotics found in yogurt but I am now very curious to find out why greek is not as recommended as plain yogurt for dogs.

How about garlic clove and human vitamin C? Any experience there? And greenies?

I believe we are what we eat and that applies to dogs as well. I switched his dry food from Science Diet and Eukanuba to Blue Basics Turkey and Potato for seniors. He actually liked the regular Blue adult formula of Lamb & Brown Rice but I have inquired Blue if he should stay with senior formula or not since he is 11 years old.
 

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Vitamin C is good. Make sure it has rose hips in it so you are getting the "whole" component. I've read studies that only giving the isolated component without the bioflavonoids can be damaging. I don't feed greenies. I give them chicken feet, bully sticks, dried tracheas as chews. Yogurt is fine to give. However, if your dog has been ill yogurt does not have a high enough culture count to repopulate a system so you will have to give probiotics.
 

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re: milk Many years ago Buddy licked one of those poisonous toad they have in Arizona and was in great distress. As it was a night time weekend there were no vets open. We called a friend and trainer who had had experience and she said to give him milk. We did. OMG with in a few seconds Buddy who had been shaking, wobbling and peeing all over the place was fine and playing. If you live in an area with those frogs, keep some milk on hand. I believe it saved his life.

Re Greek yogurt what is wrong with it?
 

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There is nothing wrong with greek yogurt. It's just strained more than regular yogurt. It has higher everything than regular yogurt...protein, calcium, cultures...

A spoonful won't hurt them. Yogurt is an extra...not to be considered part of their meals. But still keep the calories in mind if your dog is overweight.
 

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Its something to do with high oxalates I believe. Something to do with hurting the kidneys/liver or something like that. I just don't give it, because whatever was said about it made it stick in my head that they shouldn't have it. I'm sorry I don't have any more info:(
 

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Its something to do with high oxalates I believe. Something to do with hurting the kidneys/liver or something like that. I just don't give it, because whatever was said about it made it stick in my head that they shouldn't have it. I'm sorry I don't have any more info:(
Is this along the lines of what you read? due to possible kidney stones?
Dog Urinary Tract Issues and Dog Treats

Personally, I dont' feed it to the dogs because it's expensive and it's not a main part of their diet. Jax only gets yogurt when I feed her honey for her allergies.
 

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Is this along the lines of what you read? due to possible kidney stones?
Dog Urinary Tract Issues and Dog Treats

Personally, I dont' feed it to the dogs because it's expensive and it's not a main part of their diet. Jax only gets yogurt when I feed her honey for her allergies.
No, I never read that. It was someone talking about it with their dogs, but it was pretty much the same idea with the kidneys.
 

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So the store is out of Marrow bones and I've been trying out different kong treat recipes and one is mixing kibble with yogurt and freezing. I bought the Greek because it was lower in salt and sugar than the regular stuff. Maybe I should toss it?
 

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I wouldn't toss it. I think you need to look at overall diet during the day. Is a spoonful really going to hurt until you use it up? You could mix it with pumpkin and freeze it too so you would lower the amount.
 

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I wouldn't toss it. I think you need to look at overall diet during the day. Is a spoonful really going to hurt until you use it up? You could mix it with pumpkin and freeze it too so you would lower the amount.
Ooh pumpkin is a good idea. :) I didn't think about that for kong filling. My dogs for the most part just get kibble. With the occasional dog cookie or marrow bone. Buddy is a really good weight for his size, according to the vet.

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I google and found several articles about greek yogurt and dogs, some in favor, others against. I asked my vet before and he said was okay as long as he did not show any side effects like diarrhea or soft stools. He also said to be conservative and not give it everyday and not too much quantity, I give 2 tablespoons 3x a week right after he eats his dry food in the morning. His stool continues to be firm.

Can I Give My Dog Greek Yogurt?

I have been feeding my dog Greek Yogurt for lunch thinking - JustAnswer

Is it ok for dogs to have yogurt? - Yahoo! Answers

Greek yogurt for tear stains? - Havanese Forum : Havanese Forums

Yogurt for Dogs
 

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Animals do not need Vitamin C. They make their own.

Harmful Vitamins
Vitamins A, B6, C and D cause toxicity in dogs, and the dog becomes ill--the results of which are sometimes fatal.

I am married to a pharmacist =) he pulls up actual research in medical journals and studies, not random junk off the internet.

If you search harmful vitamins for dogs or "should I gave my dog human vitamins" most of the things that come up will say NO, including resources on some veterinary clinic sites.

Hope this helps, even for people doctors say "too much of a good thing could be bad for you".

Some good explanation about predetermined dosing for pets and humans.
http://www.findavet.us/2012/06/human-multivitamins-safe-dogs/
 

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Vitamin C is water soluble. It is not harmful to dogs or people. You can take mega doses and what your body, or their body, doesn't need will just wash out in the urine.
 

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But why stuff an animal pointlessly with something they don't need at all? none of the benefits were ever confirmed in a study...

"Unlike humans who require vitamin C to sustain life, dogs possess the natural ability to make their own. Without vitamin C humans get a disease called scurvy — and die.

Yet dogs do just fine without it.

However, there have been some reports claiming that vitamin C could help in the treatment of bladder infections.

Or even hip dysplasia.

Unfortunately, those claims have never been scientifically confirmed by research. So, don’t worry if you don’t find vitamin C — or any of the fruits or vegetables that naturally contain it — on your dog food’s ingredient list.

Your dog can take care of that missing nutrient all by herself."


Allot of the toxins are from color additives that are ok for humans and not for animals.

I guess I am going to trust an actual scientist who studies the chemicals and can pull up fact and myth. My dog will only be getting what he needs and I wont experiment on him based on what someone thinks is ok or not.
 

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While healthy dogs do produce Vitamin C, stress, injury and age can cause it to be inadequate. Here are some sources that refute the idea that no dog ever needs Vitamin C:

Dr. Clemmons (a leading authority on DM research) has a set of recommendations for supplements (INCLUDING some vitamins) for all GSDs -- with higher doseages for DM dogs. My vet recommended I look at and consider these recommendations as part of my senior dog's comprehensive elder care and management of arthritis, and my vet knew of Dr. Clemmons by reputation. Dr. Clemmons recommends B-Complex, E (mixed tocopherol), and C, among other things:
Degenerative Myelopathy of German Shepherds

As for Vitamin C, I use Ester-C for my senior because it's more easily tolerated, and it's the one that's actually been studied in dogs and found to provide a benefit for dogs with arthritis:
Vitamin May Relieve Pain Of Hip Dysplasia - Spokesman Mobile - Oct. 6, 1996
There was a small U.S. study that found great benefit. It was based on another Norwegian study I can't find right now that found similar benefit. You may not like the studies (small, perhaps not peer reviewed--I don't know), and they may not be funded by big pharma, but they are out there.
 

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The seniors need more vitamin C as well. How do you know that each dog creates the required amount of vitamin C needed? Each are individual living beings with individual requirements, just like us. C has been shown to help Pano, arthritis, etc. Studies, legitimate studies, are out there.

And this comment...
I guess I am going to trust an actual scientist who studies the chemicals and can pull up fact and myth. My dog will only be getting what he needs and I wont experiment on him based on what someone thinks is ok or not.
We are not uneducated morons using yahoo and wikipedia as our source. We, too, are perfectly capable of understanding peer reviewed articles with legitimate references. If you don't want to give a vitamin based on the information you have, that is fine. But I do get tired on condescending comments like this. You are not the only person in the world with medical professionals in the family. Or if you look around, there are plenty of scientists and medical professionals on this very board.
 

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I am not trying to argue or disagree at all, I just see allot of people giving their dogs things that "they think" help the dog. I would only do it if my vet tell me that "your dog could benefit from this" because.... after blood work etc. I would not just do it because I saw it somewhere online in a review =) I don't disagree that senior dogs might need it.

I use similar principals for myself... My sister in law kept telling me to take "one a day" and after blood work my doctor told me do what you are doing, everything is perfect, don't add what you don't need. And recently there was a study showing that people OD on vitamins and some vitamin build up is leading to cancer. So its just the whole home remedy topic in general. Its a persons choice, but I would not experiment on my pet. I would ask a professional first if there is a problem and try to find a solution.
 
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