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Our Kotah is a small tan gsd mix weighing in only at 4.6lbs at 8 weeks according to her visit at the veterinary clinic 7 days ago after getting spayed. we believe she may be lab mix??? Not really sure with her being our first family pet. Anywho I'm just very curious to know if she's gonna get a growth sprut and become a large family dog like we wanted... She was the smallest out of 6 siblings but her energy tells you different lol. We love her our little Kotah
 

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Anywho I'm just very curious to know if she's gonna get a growth sprut and become a large family dog like we wanted... She was the smallest out of 6 siblings but her energy tells you different lol. We love her our little Kotah

I had a GSD/lab mix growing up. She was a great gal. Normally pups grow like a weed until about 6 months, and then settle into a nice slow growth.

Your pup is a cutie.
 

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Hi and welcome! She's got a nice set of paws on her, can't really tell how big she will be though. I'm sure she's got some growing to do and will keep you hopping! A bit of advice for ya though, start training her to let you cut her nails now! One of my boys is easy, the other is a holy terror!
 

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Thank you, so do you see a resemblance in my pup compared to my he gsd mix you had?
 

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Hi and welcome! She's got a nice set of paws on her, can't really tell how big she will be though. I'm sure she's got some growing to do and will keep you hopping! A bit of advice for ya though, start training her to let you cut her nails now! One of my boys is easy, the other is a holy terror!
I'm hoping she reaches 60-70 as an adult... And I believe with me being a platinum member at her vet, she get 2 free grooming a year. Or do you suggested I do it my self??
 

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I'm hoping she reaches 60-70 as an adult... And I believe with me being a platinum member at her vet, she get 2 free grooming a year. Or do you suggested I do it my self??

I've always done it myself so I guess I just assumed everyone else would too! :) Sometimes they accept more from mom or dad than a stranger!
 

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Welcome!What a cutie!She'll need her nails clipped once a month at least.Good idea to get her used to being touched everywhere,ears,paws,mouth,etc.Enjoy!
 

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Welcome!What a cutie!She'll need her nails clipped once a month at least.Good idea to get her used to being touched everywhere,ears,paws,mouth,etc.Enjoy!
my son who is 1 turning 2 in July is all over her, he caresses her all over it's so cute.. I just have a family of 3 and we all touch her, love her and feed from hand she's gonna be a great dog
 

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A GSD/Lab mix is the two most popular breeds in one dog.

You didn't have to choose between one or the other.

Kotah is going to be a wonderful family pet and companion as she grows older.
 

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A GSD/Lab mix is the two most popular breeds in one dog.

You didn't have to choose between one or the other.

Kotah is going to be a wonderful family pet and companion as she grows older.
Thanks Norman appreciate it

Sent from my 5054N using Tapatalk
 

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cute pup!
 

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Paws aren't a scientific thing to go by, but going by paws gives you a pretty good idea...and she has some big paws! She should definitely hit that 60 lb+ size you'd like.


But as others said with touching, more than just the usual touching all around her with pets and play.
Have her used to being touched/inspected while being calm about it. Don't just touch her eyes while letting all of her head. Actually have her sit still while you touch it and look inside it. If her ears ever get gunky (earwax and dirty build up over time), you can clean them with a q-tip. But she needs to be still for that.
REALLY touch her front and back feet. Inspect and touch between her toes. You should trim nails much more often than twice/year. It isn't just about saving your floors and possessions: it's for her health. Bonus of touching her feet early on: if you live in an area where it gets heavy snow, she'll be more accepting of you putting booties on her feet (not so much for snow, but when it becomes ice...ice can really cut up a running dog's feet).
Touch more than just her snout. Actually open it and touch those teeth. Note: make sure you teach bite inhibition (look up how to do so. Even for the tiniest nibble, it shouldn't be allowed. Because when she's big, even giving a 10% effort nibble is going to be unpleasant to you. And right now her mouthing may not hurt much, but she's actually biting at around 80% effort...you REALLY don't want her to think that is okay behavior when big!)
Get her used to baths and being dried off with a towel (you can practicing 'toweling' even when dry). You'll be glad you did this when shes bigger and it is a rainy day! You'll want to wipe the mud off her before she walks around the house. Also good for when you take her swimming--you don't want a big wet dog in your car.
Get her used to you keeping her eyes open. Possibly give her 'placebo eye drops.' There isn't much worse than a dog getting an eye infection and refusing eye drops. You have to be precise with eye drops and keeping an unaccepting big dog's head still? Not fun nor easy. Very frustrating and can be very frustrating for the dog, which can lead to a very bad outcome.

Doing these things will help you with your dog's health. It'll help develop the bond between you. It'll help with obedience. It'll make your dog a pleasure for everyone who works at your vet and has to take care of & examine it. If you ever want to take her to the groomers to get a really nice trim if ever needed, they'll be very thankful your dog is calm with things.
Bonus: stuff like this is part of the basic CGC title, which is something you should strive to achieve, if this is your first dog, as it covers the basics you'll want to have with your dog. You don't have to go and actually pass the test, but as a new dog owner, you'll want to at least look up the stuff involved in the test to see what are some basic things to do with the dog.
 

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Paws aren't a scientific thing to go by, but going by paws gives you a pretty good idea...and she has some big paws! She should definitely hit that 60 lb+ size you'd like.


But as others said with touching, more than just the usual touching all around her with pets and play.
Have her used to being touched/inspected while being calm about it. Don't just touch her eyes while letting all of her head. Actually have her sit still while you touch it and look inside it. If her ears ever get gunky (earwax and dirty build up over time), you can clean them with a q-tip. But she needs to be still for that.
REALLY touch her front and back feet. Inspect and touch between her toes. You should trim nails much more often than twice/year. It isn't just about saving your floors and possessions: it's for her health. Bonus of touching her feet early on: if you live in an area where it gets heavy snow, she'll be more accepting of you putting booties on her feet (not so much for snow, but when it becomes ice...ice can really cut up a running dog's feet).
Touch more than just her snout. Actually open it and touch those teeth. Note: make sure you teach bite inhibition (look up how to do so. Even for the tiniest nibble, it shouldn't be allowed. Because when she's big, even giving a 10% effort nibble is going to be unpleasant to you. And right now her mouthing may not hurt much, but she's actually biting at around 80% effort...you REALLY don't want her to think that is okay behavior when big!)
Get her used to baths and being dried off with a towel (you can practicing 'toweling' even when dry). You'll be glad you did this when shes bigger and it is a rainy day! You'll want to wipe the mud off her before she walks around the house. Also good for when you take her swimming--you don't want a big wet dog in your car.
Get her used to you keeping her eyes open. Possibly give her 'placebo eye drops.' There isn't much worse than a dog getting an eye infection and refusing eye drops. You have to be precise with eye drops and keeping an unaccepting big dog's head still? Not fun nor easy. Very frustrating and can be very frustrating for the dog, which can lead to a very bad outcome.

Doing these things will help you with your dog's health. It'll help develop the bond between you. It'll help with obedience. It'll make your dog a pleasure for everyone who works at your vet and has to take care of & examine it. If you ever want to take her to the groomers to get a really nice trim if ever needed, they'll be very thankful your dog is calm with things.
Bonus: stuff like this is part of the basic CGC title, which is something you should strive to achieve, if this is your first dog, as it covers the basics you'll want to have with your dog. You don't have to go and actually pass the test, but as a new dog owner, you'll want to at least look up the stuff involved in the test to see what are some basic things to do with the dog.
Excellent post!
 

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Bah, too late to edit that previous post.

Don't just touch her eyes while letting all of her head. Actually have her sit still while you touch it and look inside it.
My phone changed words on me. >.<

Supposed to read:
Don't just touch her ears while petting all of her head. Actually have her sit still while you touch it and look inside it.

That makes a bit more sense. :D
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Paws aren't a scientific thing to go by, but going by paws gives you a pretty good idea...and she has some big paws! She should definitely hit that 60 lb+ size you'd like.


But as others said with touching, more than just the usual touching all around her with pets and play.
Have her used to being touched/inspected while being calm about it. Don't just touch her eyes while letting all of her head. Actually have her sit still while you touch it and look inside it. If her ears ever get gunky (earwax and dirty build up over time), you can clean them with a q-tip. But she needs to be still for that.
REALLY touch her front and back feet. Inspect and touch between her toes. You should trim nails much more often than twice/year. It isn't just about saving your floors and possessions: it's for her health. Bonus of touching her feet early on: if you live in an area where it gets heavy snow, she'll be more accepting of you putting booties on her feet (not so much for snow, but when it becomes ice...ice can really cut up a running dog's feet).
Touch more than just her snout. Actually open it and touch those teeth. Note: make sure you teach bite inhibition (look up how to do so. Even for the tiniest nibble, it shouldn't be allowed. Because when she's big, even giving a 10% effort nibble is going to be unpleasant to you. And right now her mouthing may not hurt much, but she's actually biting at around 80% effort...you REALLY don't want her to think that is okay behavior when big!)
Get her used to baths and being dried off with a towel (you can practicing 'toweling' even when dry). You'll be glad you did this when shes bigger and it is a rainy day! You'll want to wipe the mud off her before she walks around the house. Also good for when you take her swimming--you don't want a big wet dog in your car.
Get her used to you keeping her eyes open. Possibly give her 'placebo eye drops.' There isn't much worse than a dog getting an eye infection and refusing eye drops. You have to be precise with eye drops and keeping an unaccepting big dog's head still? Not fun nor easy. Very frustrating and can be very frustrating for the dog, which can lead to a very bad outcome.

Doing these things will help you with your dog's health. It'll help develop the bond between you. It'll help with obedience. It'll make your dog a pleasure for everyone who works at your vet and has to take care of & examine it. If you ever want to take her to the groomers to get a really nice trim if ever needed, they'll be very thankful your dog is calm with things.
Bonus: stuff like this is part of the basic CGC title, which is something you should strive to achieve, if this is your first dog, as it covers the basics you'll want to have with your dog. You don't have to go and actually pass the test, but as a new dog owner, you'll want to at least look up the stuff involved in the test to see what are some basic things to do with the dog.
Thank you so much for such an informative post, I'll be sure to do everything that you have noted in this post, its the little things like cleaning our dogs ear like you have mentioned that gets over looked, with my son turning 2 in July, and me wanting Kotah to be our house family dog I want her to be up to part in health and obedience. Again thank you and I really appreciate it
 
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