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Hi! I haven't postedcin quite a while. We have been settling in a new bigger home...we now have a large yard for Apache to roam and run...
Let me fast forward to his age and stats so far. He is 1 year old now. Solid black in color and DDr bloodline. He has a very living, sweet nature which we all love about him...always happy for the most part and sits on command, waits for his treats....he is our family dog. We love him.
Problem lately. ( past few months) his behavior has changed. Still living, but food aggression has been happening. Agressive behavior over pillows...he is wanting to mount them )not fixed) and showing ownership i believe. Growling over a pillow if we are too close to one....growling low if he's in his spot to sleep or rest, and i approach him. Maybe he is warning me.
Today i was blow drying my child's hair on the short couch, and we were sitting beside a pillow on the floor...he ran to the pillow growling, and tried to grab it up with his teeth...I scolded him and he continued growling but submissovely came to me putting his snout under my arms ( what is up with this?? ) so i gently grabbed his snout and was talkin to him, and he growled and bit my face.
Okay...in his defense....the bite could havecbeen gruesome and awful, but he put his teeth on my face and didn't apply much pressure. Was he holding back? I know he can bite much harder than that. I had no blood or bitecmarks, put him out asap....i feel like i am to blame for babying him whole contrarily scolding him. I got too close to his face maybe?
Any opinions. ? I tried to relay this as best as i can, when it happened. I definitely want him fixed. Would that help. My husbands friend suggested fixing him, and if he continues to put him down ? seems so final and harsh. I just am confused.
 

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Please do not let this dog around your children. He nipped at your face, but he could maul a child.

I agree with Jax08 on this. Time for a come to Jesus meeting with the dog, but also for you as well. I am sorry to sound harsh, I don't mean any of thing in a bad way, but if you are going to fix this situation, you have to start with YOU.

The best time to deal with this was months ago, at the first growl or, better yet, BEFORE the first growl if you are astute enough to pick up on the symptoms. Find a good trainer that will not only work with the dog, but with you as well. You'll need to learn how to earn his respect and his trust. This is not an overnight fix so be prepared for the long haul. It probably won't be a pleasant process. You and the dog may end up frustrated for a while.

You should also consider a vet appointment. Let the vet know about the change in behavior and ask for a full work up to check for any underlying conditions that may be causing it.

Right now, this very minute, you need to make sure that the dog does not have access to your kids and you need to keep it that way until you can handle him.

All that said.......

I am so sorry that you are having to go through this! I have been bitten by a dog twice in my life. Once by a pit bull that was going after my sister. I stuck my arm out and took the bite that was intended for her.

The other time, I was bitten by my own doberman. The bite came out of nowhere. She was laying calming by my side with her head in my lap sleeping, she woke up saw my hand and attacked. She was 16 years old at the time, I was the only owner she had ever had, and she had never, not once, shown any aggression to me or any member of my family. The vet found a lesion on her brain that caused a form of canine dementia. I was relieved that it was a medical problem. It was heart breaking to think that the dog that I had loved for so long would attack me like that.

It is scary. Before I knew what was wrong I went through anger, intense sadness, guilt......every emotion possible. Being bitten by my own dog was probably the hardest "doggy thing" that has ever happened to me.
 

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I am sure I saw a very recent post under another user name because this one was lost. I believe it included a video where the dog appeared to be in pain and growling when approached. Not sure what came of that, but I think it would be an important part of the story.
 

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I skimmed some of your earlier posts and noticed this,

...I had been on a wait list for this pup for a year.
I agree with many of the comments above, and I would add to them -

Have you discussed this with your breeder? This is a serious problem. If your breeder is an adept trainer/handler, s/he may be willing to help with a behavioral evaluation and teach you and the dog to live together safely.

Especially if finances or another external complication is getting in the way of you hiring a real, qualified, trainer - call your breeder. And be blunt, don't gloss over the matter. Ask for help.
 

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If memory serves this dog has had many issues of lameness and pain some of which resulted in growling.

The believe there was resource guarding starting pretty young as well. and lacking in lots of leadership and other things he needed.

I don't think you are going to hear anything now you haven't already heard 100 times. Get a good trainer. If there is still any unresolved pain stuff time to resolve it
 

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This problem started months ago in Sept 2017.
http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum/general-behavior/713866-well-has-been-long-while-back-some-questions-please-help.html#post8681514

What have you done to fix it so far? Gone to any trainers? Given this, I would be more inclined to think this is continued lack of management and training. The dog has just been gaining confidence in these actions for most of his life.

Call Dave Kroyer
https://www.canineheadquarters.com/
Agree but besides gaining confidence potentially also having issues aggravated and made worse by the wrong handling, response and management because I assume no trainer was ever utilized and on top of that the dog has physical problems
 

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A husband that smacks him with newspaper for peeing and pooping, a mother in law that kicks him, kids taking pig ears away. Poor boy!

I went back and read through your previous threads. You got a lot of solid advice (I listed a few below). In these threads, I saw lots of frustration and drama as a puppy worked your nerves. I saw you frequently say that you were going to get a trainer. But, I also saw how much you love your dog! It's wonderful that you love him so. I wish every dog were that loved.

But, you have got to handle this. The behavior has escalated with this dog from day one, and nothing has been done to alleviate the situation. You are getting very close to the point that your kids are at risk (in an earlier post, you said that he'd already growled and nipped at the kids). But, at the same time, you are putting the dog that you love in great danger as well. When he does bite and harm someone (note that I said when, not if), you may be required to put him down depending on where you are. You will end up with a dog that must be crated all the time, except this dog is not crate trained, so his option will be to be placed in a kennel outside, which will only make things worse for both him and your family. Please, you simply MUST get some help that will teach YOU how to handle this dog! If not, be prepared to have your kids scarred by a dog bite and to have a dog that must be killed due to aggression.

Wolfy Dog said: Reminds me of a quote: If you treat them like people, they will treat you like a dog. (He is treating you like a dog. You are not a dog. You've gotta do something!)

Cloudpump said: You need a trainer that will train you.

Bramble said: You are giving him way too much freedom.
 

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This source says that neutering is not always a fix for aggression and can make things worse. The ?Quick Fix??: Neutering As A Treatment For Aggression ? Dr. Jen's Dog Blog



I'm not a behavioral expert but I think that it's conflicting messages and environment more than hormones causing issues here.


I also have read an article, which of course I cannot find right now, saying that neutering can actually increase aggressiveness if the aggression is not sexual. The study was done on quite a big sample of dogs. The drive for the article was due to the fact that not many dogs get neutered in Europe in comparison to NA. Food for thought. Maybe someone read the same article.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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I also have read an article, which of course I cannot find right now, saying that neutering can actually increase aggressiveness if the aggression is not sexual. The study was done on quite a big sample of dogs. The drive for the article was due to the fact that not many dogs get neutered in Europe in comparison to NA. Food for thought. Maybe someone read the same article.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Was this the article?

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/canine-corner/201702/are-there-behavior-changes-when-dogs-are-spayed-or-neutered
 

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I hope the OP called a trainer. This could be a very serious situation if it's not stopped now.
 

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After all the help we offered last year, this doesn't surprise me.
I posted the following on 9/29/2017: "First of all, so glad that you guys are OK.
Now back to the dog. It was to be expected and no surprise to me regarding the earlier threads and the dog not being taken seriously but mainly loved and cuddled. This is just the start. Time to hire a good trainer and not let the kids or dog get away with anything. Having gone through all this turmoil of the hurricane is no excuse to not train him. A sound temperamented dog can handle this and it is history for the dog.
Do not punish growling as it will result in a direct bite later on. Consider the growl a warning and a red flag to get you involved in controlling this young dog. He is close to biting and doing a lot of damage. Then what?"

Now you posted, "always happy for the most part and sits on command, waits for his treats....he is our family dog". This is all you are expecting from him? I think pretty soon you have a bigger problem on your hands and most likely the dog has to pay the ultimate price. Sorry to be blunt but I have seen this too often in the head lines,"x-breed kills child in an unprovoked attack." Most attacks are not unprovoked. Instead people have ignored or not understood warning signs. These dogs are failed by their humans and started out as live stuffed animals but their animal needs, instincts and reflexes ignored. But you have had good advice least year.
 

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This is sad given all the good advice you had.

Either change your act or find a better home that can give this dog what he needs. He has zero boundaries, limited training, no guidance, what do you expect ? You need to hire a trainer to train YOU or give the dog to someone more capable.
 

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Unfortunately, I remember quite a few of your previous threads. You have had a lot of issues with this dog. I'm sorry that is has been so difficult for all of you, but others have given you clear, solid advice which seems to have gone mostly ignored. I know that it has been mentioned before that he might be too much "dog" for you, and that seems to be the case again.

Get a trainer or re-home the dog. At this point, re-homing the dog seems like the best option because you keep having issue after issue. I do not mean to sound harsh or rude, but I think you need a serious wake-up call. Sitting on command is not a huge accomplishment. This dog needs MUCH more training, boundaries, stability, and much less babying.
 

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At this point, re-homing the dog seems like the best option because you keep having issue after issue. I do not mean to sound harsh or rude, but I think you need a serious wake-up call. Sitting on command is not a huge accomplishment. This dog needs MUCH more training, boundaries, stability, and much less babying.
This is the best advice you could get in this situation. I know for sure that we all mean this in a respectful way. You all will be happier, including your dog who is not living to his potential at all. Please rehome him before you have to put him down. Consider it a lesson learned. We all have had these lessons on our plates and made us better dog owners/trainers.
Then take a break and if you still decide to get a dog, get a good old soul who has proven to be a good family dog.
OP, thank for being honest through this all. Keep everyone safe and the dog as well.
 
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