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Discussion Starter #1
Piper will play with Ranger sometime, but often he gets too rough. I'v tried waiting to see if she will be one to tell the kid to cut it out, but she never growls at him only resorting to biting his cheek when he gets too demanding. She doesnt bite hard to hurt him seriously...just enough to get his attention

 

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Cute video. What does Piper do when he gets too rough? She seemed to be kind of enjoying it in the video, at least from what I could tell...
 

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What is it with shepherds and smashing their butts into you? I agree with Tim, she looks like she's not too bothered.
 

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My little pit does the cheek bite too when he is annoyed. They play fight a lot, when one gets too rough the other let's them know. Then they either go off to their separate corners and sulk, or the offender will switch to kissing the victim's face. They seem to have pretty appropriate conflict resolution for now. Lol I do watch it closely and just don't allow it if I can't supervise somewhat. In my experience once it escalates to a real fight with two dogs, then the potential always remains. Piper is a saint :) They seem to be good companions. I know how she feels, I wish I could bite my kid's cheeks sometimes when they are climbing all over me when I am trying to catch 10 minutes of sitting down and chilling out lol
 

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Am I really the only one here who thinks this doesn't look cute or thinks that the female enjoys his antics? To me she is too soft to send him off. If she were more dominant she would have just her front teeth exposed and aggressively tell him "NO!!" and not expose all of them, which shows tension. Also the GSD is not respecting her. My first gut feeling told me to protect her. Wrong observations?
 

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@;
Am I really the only one here who thinks this doesn't look cute or thinks that the female enjoys his antics? To me she is too soft to send him off. If she were more dominant she would have just her front teeth exposed and aggressively tell him "NO!!" and not expose all of them, which shows tension. Also the GSD is not respecting her. My first gut feeling told me to protect her. Wrong observations?
Watching again, yeah I'd probably intervene. There is a disparity in size with my two as well but they do keep each other in line and cues are respected.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I do kinda feel he can be a little bit of a bully with her. She is soft. We adopted her almost three years ago from a friend of my wife's after Maverick died.

My wifes friend "shacked" up with a rancher who had cows and other dogs..none of the animals liked her and her boyfriend did not want her in the house so she spent the fall of 2014 and January 15 mostly isolated from the other animals in a kennel.

There are 4 stages of play between them.

1) She will actually move when playing with him

2) She will mostly just sit there if I am close by because she knows I will eventually save her - i dont like doing that because I want her to assert herself more and tell him dog to dog.

3) She tries to avoid or escape him

4) She bares teeth and tries to get him in the cheek. He whimpers and submits to her...for a few seconds
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Now when we got Maverick Ginger was already upset when I got married - she didnt want to share me with anybody. She never played with him. She would growl if he walked by her sometime.
 

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Personally, I think if you intervene you do more harm than good. Dogs are very very good at regulating each other. And whether it makes sense to us or not, from what I've seen if the older and softer dog really is bothered, she won't hesitate to communicate that VERY clearly. The thing is, if you look closely at the video she's clearly enjoying the game...

I currently have an 80 lb 1 yr old GSD and a 5 or 6 lb chi in my house...never had to intervene and they've effectively established their own structure...more often than not when I get up they're snuggled up together! Dogs do this well...people muddy the interaction for both dogs by intervening!
 

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Tim, that really isn't a good idea. While it might work with 2 dogs that are confident and well-adjusted socially, an overly soft dog and a rebellious puppy are more likely to result in issues. Many soft, fearful or otherwise unsocialized dogs won't give a warning of "hey back off". They will try to avoid, give ambiguous cues of discomfort (puppies will often ignore or not understand even well-spoken social cues because they are puppies), and otherwise try to just ignore the situation. Then, instead of a "back off" warning the insecure dog will go full out attack because of panic.
I have one of those dogs. Singe will simply give Kaylee "the look" and she'll back off. If she gets persistent, he'll give a grumble and lift a bit of lip as Wolfy described above. In an extreme case, he might sit on her until she quiets down.
Hemi, on the other hand, will make a half-hearted attempt that is somewhere between accepting play and trying to avoid her. If she goes too far, he goes from 0 to 60 with snarling, biting and full on panic. Kaylee has a large scar on her nose to prove it. And it happened in the blink of an eye. Less than an inch difference and she could have lost an eye.

Much easier to teach the puppy house manners and that being annoying (to dogs or humans) doesn't get you play and attention.
 

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I do kinda feel he can be a little bit of a bully with her. She is soft. We adopted her almost three years ago from a friend of my wife's after Maverick died.

My wifes friend "shacked" up with a rancher who had cows and other dogs..none of the animals liked her and her boyfriend did not want her in the house so she spent the fall of 2014 and January 15 mostly isolated from the other animals in a kennel.

There are 4 stages of play between them.

1) She will actually move when playing with him

2) She will mostly just sit there if I am close by because she knows I will eventually save her - i dont like doing that because I want her to assert herself more and tell him dog to dog.

3) She tries to avoid or escape him

4) She bares teeth and tries to get him in the cheek. He whimpers and submits to her...for a few seconds
When you bring pup into a home with an older dog the pup is always want to instigate play and often the older dog does not want to be bothered. Practicing leave its for the new pup will be a way of life for awhile. Lol! With our older chihuahua and our new pup Max I had to make sure our chihuahua was not harassed. Perfected lots of leave it’s with Max as a pup. We had a crate for our chihuahua to where he spent much of his day on his own accord which made things easier. Play was supervised. When we brought Luna our second gsd pup home it was much easier in the fact Max is is very playful and was always ready to play. Our chihuahua was not bothered much by Luna because she already had s play friend.
https://youtu.be/asVQYYSWPJc
 

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Am I really the only one here who thinks this doesn't look cute or thinks that the female enjoys his antics? To me she is too soft to send him off. If she were more dominant she would have just her front teeth exposed and aggressively tell him "NO!!" and not expose all of them, which shows tension. Also the GSD is not respecting her. My first gut feeling told me to protect her. Wrong observations?
It could be she is soft and reluctant to warn him off or she could be willing to play at times, however this is not one of them and is just "mailing in" her effort.

My female Tuke usually loves to play, but from time to time she will greet invitations half heartedly. If she really does not want to be bothered she has no qualms about letting them know and the initiator quickly gets the point.

The video is a small glimpse of their interactions, however if most of their encounters resemble what is shown than its time to step in.
 

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I've seen a trend in soft dogs getting overrun by pushy puppies. The puppies don't get corrected and grow up continuing to be pushy. They aren't ever taught boundaries and this can cause issues with dogs who do have boundaries. Sure it's nice if your older dog will step in and correct but if they don't or the puppy ignores the correction then it's better for the human to step in. As others have said it is only a short video showing a small part of their lives but the other dog looks tense and uncomfortable. If she is actually tense and uncomfortable and this is a regular occurrence personally I'd put an end to it. My mastiff wouldn't correct my puppy if she chewed on his ears but it left wounds on him and that can lead to issues, so I put an end to it since he wouldn't. Sometimes you have to step in.

My friend's parent has a dog that frantically licks other dogs mouths. I let one of my dogs correct her when she did it but then after that my dog was bullying her a bit. I got after her for that and then they both behaved and play perfectly with each other. However if her owners would correct her mouth licking behavior there would be no issues in the first place. Sometimes human interference is better than none because dogs will not always sort it out. Or they'll start aggressively fighting and once that starts you're in a bad place.
 

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I had a similar combo several years ago; an old female Whippet and a young male GSD (I know, bad decision :eek: ). She hated him from day one and I had to do a lot of management as she just couldn't physically handle him. One day the oldie was brought back by her dog sitter after our vacation and she (dog) refused to leave her car where she was curled up with her new buddies: two older Whippets, owned by the sitter. I tried to coax her out, and she came to politely say "hi" but jumped back in the car right away. Long story short: she moved in with her new older breed mates. when I visited her two weeks later to make sure she didn't change her mind. But no, she stayed on her bed next to her ex-dog sitter, now owner. We honored her decision and she lived 3 peaceful years until she died peacefully on her bed at 15 years old. I doubt she would have made it this old if I had not listened to her.
So OP, if this video shows the typical daily interactions, your sweet older dog is under a lot of stress and I feel sorry if you implement Tim's advice by letting them "sort it out" , which is basically abandoning her and allowing the bullying to go on. Our dogs do not lead a natural life. If they did, she probably would leave but can't.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thanks for all the replies.

So the gist of what I got from y'alls responses is to intervene if she does not look like she is 100 % into the play and not wait for her to respond to him.

Just this morning they were playing just fine for a few minutes, but there came a point when she was trying to get in my lap while i was sitting on the couch.

Even in this video near the beginning of their play time you can see her coming to me a few times...

 

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Tim, that really isn't a good idea. While it might work with 2 dogs that are confident and well-adjusted socially, an overly soft dog and a rebellious puppy are more likely to result in issues. Many soft, fearful or otherwise unsocialized dogs won't give a warning of "hey back off". They will try to avoid, give ambiguous cues of discomfort (puppies will often ignore or not understand even well-spoken social cues because they are puppies), and otherwise try to just ignore the situation. Then, instead of a "back off" warning the insecure dog will go full out attack because of panic.
I have one of those dogs. Singe will simply give Kaylee "the look" and she'll back off. If she gets persistent, he'll give a grumble and lift a bit of lip as Wolfy described above. In an extreme case, he might sit on her until she quiets down.
Hemi, on the other hand, will make a half-hearted attempt that is somewhere between accepting play and trying to avoid her. If she goes too far, he goes from 0 to 60 with snarling, biting and full on panic. Kaylee has a large scar on her nose to prove it. And it happened in the blink of an eye. Less than an inch difference and she could have lost an eye.

Much easier to teach the puppy house manners and that being annoying (to dogs or humans) doesn't get you play and attention.

Just to clarify, I did not suggest not teaching the puppy house manners, or even advocate never stepping in. What I said was I saw nothing at all in the initial video that indicated the older dog was not enjoying herself. I do believe that upwards of 95% of the time people step in because it bothers them, the dog's are fine. And if you always step in to break them up you're actually reinforcing a sort of learned helplessness in the older dog...I've seen this increase the the conflict often, when the dog's are left alone. But, again, to each their own!
 

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Thanks for all the replies.

So the gist of what I got from y'alls responses is to intervene if she does not look like she is 100 % into the play and not wait for her to respond to him.

Just this morning they were playing just fine for a few minutes, but there came a point when she was trying to get in my lap while i was sitting on the couch.

Even in this video near the beginning of their play time you can see her coming to me a few times...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oPP-0H-1_hA
She does not look to annoyed there, to me at least. When mine tussle they have this really annoying habit of following me around while doing their dog MMA. Bumping my legs, playing at my feet. I think it is their way of paying attention to their person while not paying attention to their person lol
 
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