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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
My friend has a female gsd and she bred her to her male any way I noticed the other day when I was petting her that she has a small hernia doesn't look like it is reducible but is she able to carry a litter to full term my friend said it was because mom pulled on her to hard and that it was not hereditary and that she's seen other dogs give birth with a hernia
Is that true and if so has anyone been thru this I was going to buy a puppy from her but now I'm worried about t
he mom dog. Update she was thinking about getting abortion but she doesn't see a problem with continuing the pregnancy
 

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Eska von den Roten Vorbergen
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Hernias are quite common, and no, they are not hereditary, as far as I know. I would not worry about it. The owner is the one that needs to worry, in case pregnancy makes it get bigger. If that happens, they easy to fix, though!
 

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I have no idea how hernias affect pregnancy and welping, but yes, it's possible to spay a pregnant dog -- it's a a spay-abortion. It's commonly done in shelters when stray dogs show up pregnant. Private clinics also do it to get rid of "oops litters" and/or protect the life of one that cannot safely have the litter. Talk to your vet. It will cost more than a standard spay, but the earlier you can do it, the better.
 

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I'm confused? In your other post you asked about a friends pregnant dog with a hernia and were thinking of getting a pup from that intentional breeding. Is the breeder intending to abort and spay the female now?
 

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I have no experience with hernias or breeding but I think your friend should ask a qualified vet what the best course of action should be. If your friend is going to breed than she should have a good close relationship with her vet through this process. Only a vet can answer her questions about the health and safety of her dog whelping with a hernia after it is examined.
 

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That small of a hernia will have no affect with her giving birth.... It's just a pocket of fatty tissue that got caught in the opening as it was closing. Not an issue....Remmoving it would be for cosmetic issue only, as it has no medical issue.
 

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Nadja- AKA the BooRoo
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We rescued a momma cat with a nursing kitten at her side who was dumped on the farm. Turns out, momma was pregnant again! She has a small hernia on her belly and had no problems having her kittens. It didn’t get worse or bigger, it was the same size. When we talked to the vet about it, they weren’t too worried about it.
 

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Yeah, be careful in suggesting someone ask their vet. Most vets are not breeders and are pro-spay. If the vet does not already have a significant relationship with the bitch's owner, they will usually tell them to spay, when there is no indication that it is a good idea even. Because vets generally do not have confidence in the general public to have litters. Rule of thumb for them is to encourage a spay as early as possible for any or no reason. This is NO reason to spay. If after the pups are born she wants to breed again, or wants to spay, the hernia can be repaired if she wants to, totally unnecessary. My feeling is, why would someone risk anesthesia for something that will cause no problems. If she wants to spay after the litter and asks for it to be fixed during that surgery, it can be. But risks increase when spaying a dog in heat or a dog that is pregnant, so to do this at this point for something totally cosmetic, that you would never know about unless you are taking a fine tooth comb to the dog's belly, well, it would be unethical for a vet to agree to it, in a perfect world.
 

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Yeah, be careful in suggesting someone ask their vet. Most vets are not breeders and are pro-spay. If the vet does not already have a significant relationship with the bitch's owner, they will usually tell them to spay, when there is no indication that it is a good idea even. Because vets generally do not have confidence in the general public to have litters. Rule of thumb for them is to encourage a spay as early as possible for any or no reason. This is NO reason to spay. If after the pups are born she wants to breed again, or wants to spay, the hernia can be repaired if she wants to, totally unnecessary. My feeling is, why would someone risk anesthesia for something that will cause no problems. If she wants to spay after the litter and asks for it to be fixed during that surgery, it can be. But risks increase when spaying a dog in heat or a dog that is pregnant, so to do this at this point for something totally cosmetic, that you would never know about unless you are taking a fine tooth comb to the dog's belly, well, it would be unethical for a vet to agree to it, in a perfect world.
Yea my friend called her vet to see if she can take her in for a wellness exam and they were trying take her get a spay abort without seeing her, vet said that because she has a hernia it could kill mom and it's not good for the puppies my friend said she didn't feel comfortable aborting and if there was a way she can get weekly check ups to ch3ck how the hernia is doing the front office clerk was like there is nothing they can do and it would be a waste of time and that she can come in for a pre surgery exam then get fixed Friday my friend told them no and she will go to a different vet
 

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Yea my friend called her vet to see if she can take her in for a wellness exam and they were trying take her get a spay abort without seeing her, vet said that because she has a hernia it could kill mom and it's not good for the puppies my friend said she didn't feel comfortable aborting and if there was a way she can get weekly check ups to ch3ck how the hernia is doing the front office clerk was like there is nothing they can do and it would be a waste of time and that she can come in for a pre surgery exam then get fixed Friday my friend told them no and she will go to a different vet
Glad she is going to go to a different vet. That is akin to mal-practice. Why the health-care professional that you choose for your dog should try to press their agenda on you, is disgusting. We should be able to trust these people. I consider my vets my health-care partners for my dogs. But I ultimately have the last say in everything, so I have to do my own research on most things, unless I choose to trust what they are saying. If they make a mistake, though, I have to live with their decision.

True story: My friend had wanted to have a litter with her bitch. Lola got sick and she rushed her to an ER and once they heard she was not spayed, they immediately diagnosed her with pyometra and said she needed an immediate spay. The owner called me, and I asked her what symptoms Lola had. It did not sound like pyometra, but I am not a vet. I knew of a good 24 hour clinic with a reproductive department in her area, and told her to take her there, that they had a lab and and ultrasound and other needed tools to properly diagnose and treat her. The ER told her that the other clinic would not be able to tell her if it was pyometra or not, and said she should spay immediately. My friend listened to me, and got the dog to the other clinic. They did the testing needed and found she had a blockage, which passed without surgery, and with her reproductive organs intact. She told them what the other clinic said about them not being able to tell diffinitively whether or not it was pyo and the vet just shook his head in disgust.

We own these marvelous creatures. They add so much to our lives. We need to educate ourselves as much as possible because as hard as it is, when the professionals make mistakes, we have to live with the results. And somehow, it doesn't make our dogs any less dead when it is someone else's fault. If my friend allowed them to spay her bitch in the state she was in, an unnecessary operation in that condition, she may have died. Maybe not. But even so, we have to be our dog's advocates and guard against agendas. I know a lot of vets have to go to shelters and euthanize unwanted pets, and that is very sad. It is not an excuse to perform unnecessary surgeries on critters in a vulnerable state because the owners are anxious about them.
 

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Eska von den Roten Vorbergen
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I bought my first registered GSD with the intentions of breeding her. One of the conditions of sale was to have a vet check done on her within 48 hours.

I told my vet I was intending to breed her. They handed me an estimate of what it would cost to spay her before I left the clinic. :rolleyes:

Talk about agendas....

And yes, there is NO WAY that vet can determine the hernia is putting the bitch's life at risk without actually seeing it! And from what you have shown here, it's a very small hernia, about maybe an inch in size, and not large enough to be any sort of a danger. Agree - that would be veterinary malpractice to force that agenda on the owner! (I'm a retired RN, so I know a bit about medical stuff!)
 
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