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Is she a good girl?

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Discussion Starter #1
Just joined this community and I am looking forward to learning more about other people's successes and failures with training their beloved GSDs. Data is 3 months old and so well behaved already. I am blown away by how quickly she learns a new command.
 

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What an alert little face!Those ears!
 

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from past experience of adopting dogs; I have found that those who were negatively trained had more fears and problems overall. Dogs, all breeds can be wonderfully trained through positive training whether its treats or praises or combo of both. I had one male GSD that was terrified of men, through training with men and treats/praises he was able to move on from his past and his new owner is a 14 year old male that he absolutely adores. I had one who was terrified of going downstairs; only to find that the previous owners continuously locked him in the basement. That was a trust issue; we never were able to get him to walk downstairs to the basement but he was happy to sit at the top with the door open and watch over everyone without crying. Training should be a happy occasion for the owner and the dog; its a bonding time period as well. If you're tired, cranky or just not into it the dog will know this and his training will be uncomfortable. It's easier to start the sessions with what the pup knows, is happy to show you what he can accomplish and then move into something new... building blocks. Each session will be easier as you go along...
 

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Discussion Starter #5
from past experience of adopting dogs; I have found that those who were negatively trained had more fears and problems overall. Dogs, all breeds can be wonderfully trained through positive training whether its treats or praises or combo of both. I had one male GSD that was terrified of men, through training with men and treats/praises he was able to move on from his past and his new owner is a 14 year old male that he absolutely adores. I had one who was terrified of going downstairs; only to find that the previous owners continuously locked him in the basement. That was a trust issue; we never were able to get him to walk downstairs to the basement but he was happy to sit at the top with the door open and watch over everyone without crying. Training should be a happy occasion for the owner and the dog; its a bonding time period as well. If you're tired, cranky or just not into it the dog will know this and his training will be uncomfortable. It's easier to start the sessions with what the pup knows, is happy to show you what he can accomplish and then move into something new... building blocks. Each session will be easier as you go along...
Great advice. We are trying to keep it positive and reward based. She learns a new command after about 3-4 repetitions, but currently will not perform the command reliably unless she knows we have a treat. Is this something that we need to train differently for, or just comes with repeated time and practice?

Since negative experiences are to be avoided when training, I am struggling to correct bad behavior at times. Example is barking in her crate. We do not want to yell or spray her etc, but we cannot seem to reward quiet time effectively. Any tips?
 

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Great advice. We are trying to keep it positive and reward based. She learns a new command after about 3-4 repetitions, but currently will not perform the command reliably unless she knows we have a treat. Is this something that we need to train differently for, or just comes with repeated time and practice?

Since negative experiences are to be avoided when training, I am struggling to correct bad behavior at times. Example is barking in her crate. We do not want to yell or spray her etc, but we cannot seem to reward quiet time effectively. Any tips?
Keep in mind that potty training some pups with a treat, it won’t be long till they’ll figure out all they have to do is go to the door and out only to return for that treat… they’ve played the owner. I found this adorable but as they grew up; the expectation that they go outside for potty was cemented in their minds; I knew it and so did they. At this time I backed off on giving a treat for every time they went out but continued with verbal praises. GSD’s are extremely smart and I suspect your dog is doing the same “I’ll do two or three items that I know and not do another till I get a treat.” I’d turn it around on her; start out with what she confidently knows in training and praise her, give her one or two treats during a set but not every time she completes the action.. but lots of beautiful praises. On new training introduce the treats again every time she does it correctly, and as you advance to new items divide treats/praises in the set. She’ll never know if she’s going to get a treat or praise but will work for the opportunity to eat the treat. Barking in the crate (demand barking) can be annoying; I have a Malamute/Shepherd mix who is more vocal than any of my shepherds…. Just a sassy little girl..lol. She will literally sit beside me demand barking, I ignore her. After a while she will lie down, other times I have crated her because she was out of control. She’ll sit in there and bark for a little bit, I ignore her until she is quiet. At the point she is quiet, I will bring her out of her crate and praise/treat her. It’s on my time, not hers. I will say that if you yell/spray her she will continue because she has received a reaction/attention from you so make it on your terms of her laying down and being quiet for you to return to her with treats/praises. My girl now uses her crate as her “safe” zone (away from my kitties) when she wants quiet time.
 

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I went back through some posts; this one is interesting and may be of help. Myself I use treats/praises because that is what works for mine... very treat motivated... which I think your is but these are more tips for positive training as well... :) What do you use to train?
 

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I'm in the extreme minority and almost never train with treats. Positive reinforcement and praise is all they really need; I want them to obey for love and because they are truly trained, not just for a reward but that's just me, seen too many fat dogs on constant liver/chicken etc bribes :)
 
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