German Shepherds Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My 7 month old male GSD is very mouthy, especially with me (female) and my 2 daughters. Is this something they grow out of? He listens to my husband when he say “down” or “no” but not for me. My husband is much more intimidating and loud. I try to be but the puppy just does not have any response. Any tips for me?
Also, he follow me around everywhere I go. He has to be with me 90% of the time. If he is tired enough, he won’t follow me but he usually muaters the strength to get up once I leave the room. Not sure if this is a good thing or not!?!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
439 Posts
He is bonding with you because you are the pushover. You need to spend more leash training and even walking. Do you leave the house properly. Do you have him walk @ your side like he should. When correcting him do you follow through 100% or does he win. Many questions not enough facts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
My 7 month old male GSD is very mouthy, especially with me (female) and my 2 daughters. Is this something they grow out of? He listens to my husband when he say “down” or “no” but not for me. My husband is much more intimidating and loud. I try to be but the puppy just does not have any response. Any tips for me?
No, the puppy does not respect you or your daughters. The puppy obviously sees your husband as the alpha male, but may see you and your two daughters more as littermates and even below him on the pecking order.

Some things like gesture eating or other dominant behavior may help this. Making sure you walk through doorways before the dog, don't let the dog lead you down stairs. Make the dog walk on the side of you during walks. And walking through your dog, not around it.

It's really a matter of just being firm. They don't get what they demand, they get things when they are obedient. Don't even put down his food if he isn't behaving. Make him sit and stay and wait for it. If they don't, try again in 5 minutes. 3 more times of that, and skip the meal.

Also, he follow me around everywhere I go. He has to be with me 90% of the time. If he is tired enough, he won’t follow me but he usually muaters the strength to get up once I leave the room. Not sure if this is a good thing or not!?!
It's normal. GSDs are extremely loyal breed. They ALWAYS want to be close to their owners. As long as they know when to sit and stay and not interfere with what your doing, it's never been an issue for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
He is bonding with you because you are the pushover. You need to spend more leash training and even walking. Do you leave the house properly. Do you have him walk @ your side like he should. When correcting him do you follow through 100% or does he win. Many questions not enough facts.
Our walks are great. Right at my side. Never pulling. I walk down stairs first and out the door first. He is perfect on the leash. I’ve tried keeping him on the leash inside to correct him and it turns into a game with him.
I correct him constantly. I think he thinks I’m playing because he keeps at it. There are time he backs down and listens but not often enough.
My vet said he is dominating me and needs to get neutered. I asked about that on these boards and everyone said not to do it for health reasons.
Any advice on establishing that I’m the boss?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,763 Posts
...

I’ve tried keeping him on the leash inside to correct him and it turns into a game with him.
I correct him constantly.
I think he thinks I’m playing because he keeps at it. There are time he backs down and listens but not often enough.
I bolded the section above to highlight your problem with your dog. You're not correcting him, you're nagging him! I've seen this more times than I can count! And IMHO your dog is behaving exactly as he's being trained to behave, believe it or not.

My vet said he is dominating me and needs to get neutered. I asked about that on these boards and everyone said not to do it for health reasons.
You need a new Vet! Neutering your dog is not the answer, and would very likely have no effect at all on this behavior, you need a trainer that can show you how to get your dog to respond!


Any advice on establishing that I’m the boss?
Being the "boss" is not about dominating your dog, it's about communicating effectively. If, when working or living with your dog, you find yourself "correcting" him more than 5% of the time, it's time to rework and restructure your approach! Here's where a good balanced trainer can help immensely! They can show you how to issue a proper correction, and how to structure things so that 95+% of the time a correction is not needed...it's all about leading your dog toward behaviors you want. It'll be the best money you've ever spent on your dog!
 
  • Like
Reactions: Opsoclonus

·
Registered
Joined
·
233 Posts
I currently have a female 7 month old puppy who also went through a mouthing stage and still occasionally tries her luck! It's usually when she is too excited and forgets the "rules". I am also a female and feel that my husband has an easy advantage in communicating a correction with a naturally deeper voice, however, I am the boss with my girl and I always am consistent and follow through, which would be my advice to you.

For example, if your dog mouths then say NO in a deep, firm tone. If they don't listen then stand or sit over them and firmly hold the bottom of their jaw pushing their tongue down with your thumb and ask the dog to SIT or LAY DOWN. Once they do this then let go. If the dog tries again say NO and do this again, do this calmly and consistently until the dog relaxes. Best to stay calm, not get angry or frustrated, realise it's just following through with a correction and will speed up once the dog realizes they can't ignore you in the future. That is how I did this with my girl and she is very good now, hope that helps! ?

Also, the dog follows you because he loves you! GSDs need to be close with their family. The mouthing is because it's a way for him to communicate that he thinks he can get away with, but just show him he can't and needs to be calm and you will have a calm & loving dog in the end ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
233 Posts
Also, not sure how old your daughters are, but if they are younger I would encourage them to make it a rule to not to run away, or move around excitedly, or make loud noises (squeals etc) if he gets mouthy, this encourages the mentality that it's a game. If he mouths I feel it's most effective all potential excitement and stimulus stops (no fun game there!), and then you or another adult can follow through with a correction.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,022 Posts
He's a puppy. Puppies are mouthy.



I'm guessing your husband isn't around as much as you and your daughters are -- he's a rare enough/special enough voice (his voice is probably deeper - and you say louder) that it gets more attention than the more often heard voices.


I think it's good that the pup follows you around. He's interested in what you are doing, wants to know where you are. I'd think you could build on that.


And, as others have alluded, your vet is wrong about neutering. Vets really need to get up to speed on neutering and quit thinking of it as a problem solver. It isn't.



I do not think walking a dog requires that the dog be by your side 100% of the time -- a little obedience work, a little heel work tossed in is great but sniffing around, looking around -- that is part of it for the dog, too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,027 Posts
Yeap... GSD pups are notorious for being mouthy. You need to say No just ONCE. If he still doesn't listen, get him on a timeout in his crate or in another room. Being mouthy to children is definitely unacceptable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,649 Posts
Leerburg.com is a wealth of great training articles by people that truly understand working breeds. Keep,soft toys near by and redirect to those when he gets mouthy. Take the time to make the toy come to life and be more fun than you. Read Leerburgs articles on socialization, kids and dogs, pack structure.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top