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Discussion Starter #1
I'll try and keep this somewhat short

Girlfriend and I are looking to get a pup either early next year to some time around spring. Figure gives us time to get funds in order to pay for the pup and all the start up portions, crate, food, vet etc and plenty of time to do our research and find whats right for us.

We're basically stuck on what to do because some breeders are telling us one thing and others another. Preference wise we prefer working line no doubt about that. But as a few breeders have told us and as we agree, its not about what look we prefer but what dog is right for us and our lifestyle.

We both work full time and live in the city (Toronto), I start work rather early and her still somewhat early, 6am for me 8am for her. I'm out of the house by 5 15 the latest not home till around 3pm-4pm She's out the door by 7 30ish and not as much an early riser as I am. So in the morning would mostly just be a 10min walk from me and maybe a qucik 5min walk from her. During the day dog would obviously be kept locked to a part of the house, probably the kitchen/sitting room roughly, somewhere where its easy to clean up any accidents, and they have space to move around but not destroy everything. Would have no problem leaving them with toys or something to keep them occupied and amused during the day.

Once home activity is no problem. Would get a nice long walk when home and exercised whether it be fetch or something, basically whatever a trainer would suggest.

On weekends in the summer/spring we're up north at the trailer/cottage so dog can socialize with other dogs/people, play fetch, swim etc. Winter can still go out and play. Once trained a bit would also be coming camping with me, as she doesn't come. Not campsite/park camping, isolated crown land camping, basically no ones getting where myself and my friends go without a 4x4 truck.

We don't have kids and not sure if we ever will but the dog would be around my nephews who are under 7yrs old.

We have no problem working with a dog and possibly getting into dog sports which is why we are considering working lines.

Our only concern really is that if we get a working line will it be too much for us to handle. This would not be our first dog but first GSD, previous dogs were hunting breeds. We don't want to make the mistake of getting a dog that will be too high energy that we could not handle. From what some breeders and other GSD owners we know or have talked to in passing have said is the right breeder should pair you with the right dog.

With that, would a working line be too much for us or would it be acceptable for a first time GSD owner? We are not fond of the sloped back and large size of a show line which is one of the main reasons we prefer working line, and both are worried that extreme slopping hips of show line just leads to health issues.
We would much rather a female as we've been told they would be the calmer side and lower energy, more of a relaxed/cuddler type which is more so what we would be looking for. The dog would absolutely be a pet/family member first and foremost.

Sorry for the long post figured try and get the most info out so we could have some more help/guidance towards which would be best for us. We don't mind working with the pup but would much rather make sure it won't be more than we can handle. And if any suggestions for working line breeders in the southern Ontario area would be greatly appreciated.

The obvious we understand
-we know look for proper breeders that x ray and health check etc
-dogs that are titled to show they have proper temperament and can work
-come from a healthy pedigree
-get the dog that is right for us not that we think looks the best (breeder matched maybe?)
 

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I think if you're prepared to invest time and energy into training and exercise, you'll most likely be fine with a working-line GSD. My first GSD was a working line. Before him, I had only owned a sheltie and toy breeds. Just look for a reputable breeder, who can match you with a medium drive puppy who will fit your needs.
 

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I am a first time GSD owner. I had a mix GSD when growing up, but it wasn't MY dog.


The people who you've spoken to are right in the sense of a good breeder will match you with a dog you should be able to handle.


That said, and I'm sure I'll get some backlash on this, but I don't think a short 10-15 minute walk in the morning will cut it for most dogs. I'm probably wrong, but I wouldn't feel comfortable leaving my WLGSD crated at home with only 15 minutes of walking.


I would also suggest crate training. It can sound cruel, but my shiba who was not crate trained (thanks to my husband) got into my medication which could have killed him and resulted in a $700 USD vet bill. My husband learned from that and allowed me to continue crating Katsu.

When I got my first dog with my husband, I went from getting up 30 minutes before work to 2 hours before work just so I had time to get some of that puppy energy out.


I'm not sure of breeders in Canada. Carmspack on the forums is in Ontario and is very knowledgeable. She breeds working lines, I believe. Maybe she would have a few suggestions on breeders (and what lines) in your area.

Some show line breeders do work their dogs and you should be able to do some sports - agility, nosework, dock diving, barnhunt, etc. Possibly IPO if that's something you are interested in. I think it's just a matter of finding the right breeder.
 
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As long as you find a breeder who breeds for correct balance of drives and an off switch, you will likely be fine with a working line. I would highly recommend you go out to clubs and see what you like before committing to a line or breeder. Go to some schutzhund clubs, even if you have no interest in the sport, and talk to owners. If you have a local GSD club, go there too. See as many dogs as you can, now, before committing to anything. Find out what you like in a dog by seeing them away from their home base. Ask the owners of dogs you like if they would recommend their dogs’ breeders. Ask about reactivity. Ask about drive capping. Ask about health. Ask about environmental soundness. A great sport dog is awesome, but if they can’t function in society, it does you no good. I have two working line dogs. My boy has weak nerves and no threshold. He would not be a good fit for what you are looking for. My girl is sound in every situation, has a great off switch, and is coming along nicely in the sports we do. My boy was a bit of a sleeper in the drive department, and was not naturally interested in engaging with me. He was difficult to really train until he turned 18 months old. Then his drives kicked in and he discovered that doing things was fun. My girl had great engagement right off the bat and nice drives to go with that. Make sure you find a breeder who looks at overall health and longevity, too. Ask about gut health. My boy has IBD and I can tell you, it is not a fun thing to deal with. Don’t get sucked into a breeder who doesn’t really do much with their breeding stock because of fear of getting “too much dog”. My girl’s dam and sire are both titled to IPO3, both have trialed at regional and national levels, yet she is the easiest house dog I’ve ever had.

Both of my GSDs are cuddly, but I would say my girl is more attached to me than my boy is. My boy likes to patrol the house and check in and cuddle for a little bit, then he’s off on his own again. My girl never leaves my side. They come from completely different lines, though, so I cannot say that has anything to do with their sex.

I also have a lab. The main difference I have seen in raising GSDs vs raising a lab has been that the lab was far less bitey, lol. Energy and drive levels are about the same. I actually find GSDs a bit easier to train in public because they kind of don’t care about other people. The lab gets distracted because he wants to meet everyone. Never had that problem with my GSDs. That said, the drives and temperament in a GSD will be completely different than what you are used to coming from hunting breeds. There are certainly more socially open GSD out there, but they still likely will not want to be friends with everyone. There is likely to be at least a little suspicion. And of course there is some defense drive that you may not have experienced before. Find a good trainer who understands the breed right off the bat and you should be fine.
 

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I am a first time GSD owner. I had a mix GSD when growing up, but it wasn't MY dog.


The people who you've spoken to are right in the sense of a good breeder will match you with a dog you should be able to handle.


That said, and I'm sure I'll get some backlash on this, but I don't think a short 10-15 minute walk in the morning will cut it for most dogs. I'm probably wrong, but I wouldn't feel comfortable leaving my WLGSD crated at home with only 15 minutes of walking.


I would also suggest crate training. It can sound cruel, but my shiba who was not crate trained (thanks to my husband) got into my medication which could have killed him and resulted in a $700 USD vet bill. My husband learned from that and allowed me to continue crating Katsu.

When I got my first dog with my husband, I went from getting up 30 minutes before work to 2 hours before work just so I had time to get some of that puppy energy out.


I'm not sure of breeders in Canada. Carmspack on the forums is in Ontario and is very knowledgeable. She breeds working lines, I believe. Maybe she would have a few suggestions on breeders (and what lines) in your area.

Some show line breeders do work their dogs and you should be able to do some sports - agility, nosework, dock diving, barnhunt, etc. Possibly IPO if that's something you are interested in. I think it's just a matter of finding the right breeder.

I strongly agree with what Katsugsd said about needing to get up earlier to tire out your pup, as well as crate training your puppy. I can get away with doing next to nothing in the morning with my adult, trained GSDs now that they are more mature (sometimes we do the “heavy lifting” at night, so to speak). But when they were puppies, they definitely needed to do something in the morning in order to settle down. I found scent work or tracking to be the most mentally exhausting thing to do with my dogs, which allowed them to be calm for longer than walks or obedience alone.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I am a first time GSD owner. I had a mix GSD when growing up, but it wasn't MY dog.


The people who you've spoken to are right in the sense of a good breeder will match you with a dog you should be able to handle.


That said, and I'm sure I'll get some backlash on this, but I don't think a short 10-15 minute walk in the morning will cut it for most dogs. I'm probably wrong, but I wouldn't feel comfortable leaving my WLGSD crated at home with only 15 minutes of walking.


I would also suggest crate training. It can sound cruel, but my shiba who was not crate trained (thanks to my husband) got into my medication which could have killed him and resulted in a $700 USD vet bill. My husband learned from that and allowed me to continue crating Katsu.

When I got my first dog with my husband, I went from getting up 30 minutes before work to 2 hours before work just so I had time to get some of that puppy energy out.


I'm not sure of breeders in Canada. Carmspack on the forums is in Ontario and is very knowledgeable. She breeds working lines, I believe. Maybe she would have a few suggestions on breeders (and what lines) in your area.

Some show line breeders do work their dogs and you should be able to do some sports - agility, nosework, dock diving, barnhunt, etc. Possibly IPO if that's something you are interested in. I think it's just a matter of finding the right breeder.
For the first week or possibly two with the pup I would be taking off work to work with him/her.

That said, I wake up at 4:30am, waking up earlier is just getting to be too much and that could technically change. The job I'm currently on is a 6AM start but they could change to 6:30AM or 7AM start. in which I would have more time in the morning. I think it would be a mix and wouldn't have an issue leaving some sort of toy maybe a kong filled with kibble or something. I know when my other dog was a pup we did that with her to keep her busy during the day.

Girlfriend and I are not against crate training at night. That was our plan at night dog sleeps in the crate, and also thinking muzzle training just to be on the safe side, given its a larger dog most vets around here want a muzzle on them when there, and my dog before hated it and it always made the vet a lot more work to bring her to as she would get even more nervous. So we aren't against that type of training.

Only reason we wouldn't leave them in a crate all day is it would just be too small of a space. We wouldn't have a problem leaving them to maybe one room where they have some space to move and some toys.

As long as you find a breeder who breeds for correct balance of drives and an off switch, you will likely be fine with a working line. I would highly recommend you go out to clubs and see what you like before committing to a line or breeder. Go to some schutzhund clubs, even if you have no interest in the sport, and talk to owners. If you have a local GSD club, go there too. See as many dogs as you can, now, before committing to anything. Find out what you like in a dog by seeing them away from their home base. Ask the owners of dogs you like if they would recommend their dogs’ breeders. Ask about reactivity. Ask about drive capping. Ask about health. Ask about environmental soundness. A great sport dog is awesome, but if they can’t function in society, it does you no good. I have two working line dogs. My boy has weak nerves and no threshold. He would not be a good fit for what you are looking for. My girl is sound in every situation, has a great off switch, and is coming along nicely in the sports we do. My boy was a bit of a sleeper in the drive department, and was not naturally interested in engaging with me. He was difficult to really train until he turned 18 months old. Then his drives kicked in and he discovered that doing things was fun. My girl had great engagement right off the bat and nice drives to go with that. Make sure you find a breeder who looks at overall health and longevity, too. Ask about gut health. My boy has IBD and I can tell you, it is not a fun thing to deal with. Don’t get sucked into a breeder who doesn’t really do much with their breeding stock because of fear of getting “too much dog”. My girl’s dam and sire are both titled to IPO3, both have trialed at regional and national levels, yet she is the easiest house dog I’ve ever had.

Both of my GSDs are cuddly, but I would say my girl is more attached to me than my boy is. My boy likes to patrol the house and check in and cuddle for a little bit, then he’s off on his own again. My girl never leaves my side. They come from completely different lines, though, so I cannot say that has anything to do with their sex.

I also have a lab. The main difference I have seen in raising GSDs vs raising a lab has been that the lab was far less bitey, lol. Energy and drive levels are about the same. I actually find GSDs a bit easier to train in public because they kind of don’t care about other people. The lab gets distracted because he wants to meet everyone. Never had that problem with my GSDs. That said, the drives and temperament in a GSD will be completely different than what you are used to coming from hunting breeds. There are certainly more socially open GSD out there, but they still likely will not want to be friends with everyone. There is likely to be at least a little suspicion. And of course there is some defense drive that you may not have experienced before. Find a good trainer who understands the breed right off the bat and you should be fine.
So I guess the trick is finding the right breeder.
One of the working lines that wasn't really in the area suggested the GSD clubs as well and told me a website to check out which I will be doing, and the girlfriend and I were going to go meet one of the show line breeders we are considering soon. So appreciate its being suggested again. That was one thing that was really confusing me is some breeders I've talked to suggest one thing and than another something else. So trying to get a consensus more so of which is more often suggested.

We definitely do not mind if the dog is more focused on us than getting easily distracted. That was one of the reasons we want a GSD. We don't want it to be aggressive obviously to strangers, nor do we want them to be easily distracted, both of which I gather can be accomplished with proper training.


Appreciate the advice and will look for the right breeder for sure.
I've heard many say GSD are actually great dogs to train and can be rather easy as they are so eager to please, would you say thats accurate?
 

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I would suggest checking out Showlinegsd also. Might be better suited to your lifestyle. No matter which you choose, plan on paying a dog walker to come in and break up the day for your gsd.
 

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Well done for taking the time to prepare. You wrote the times you and your partner leave home, but what are the times you two are back home? If you adopt a pup between 2-6 months, chances are potty training will be hard on you since the pup will be alone for a period of time 5 days a week. Pups between 2-3 months HAVE to go every 2-3 hours, 3-4 months 3-4 hours, 5-6 months 4-5 hours. One of the toughest part of having a young pup is the potty training, at least for me. Finding 'accidents' around the house is NEVER pleasant, it takes a toll on people.

Do you plan on getting a young pup? Or how old?

Working lines don't necessarily mean they have out of control energy to spare, it really depends on the dog. How active are you? I'm a relatively active person, I can provide the physical demands of a working GSD. So take that as a consideration as well.

If you get a showline from a reputable and responsible breeder, chances are they have warranty on their health.

Personally, I think energy wise is in accordance to age than the line itself. Yes, show lines can be not as sporty or energetic as working lines. But again, all depends on the dog.
 

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There are show lines that are high drive dogs too. You shouldn't limit yourself to just working lines. My 2nd GSD is a working line. He's a handful. I hope you realize what you're asking for. They're not just dogs. They're "extra" dogs.

I agree with others about crate training. My pup loves his crate. Leaving it out in an area will give you more problems than you think. If it's a chewer, plan on replacing your kitchen cabinets or kitchen floors. A toy is not going to be enough for a pup's interest for 8 hours. Most pups lose interest in a toy in minutes. If it likes to eat poop, that will be a problem since you won't be home for 8 hours. And if it doesn't, it will stink up the house like you wouldn't believe. Just like McGloomy said above, finding accidents becomes very stressful. Some pups, like mine, like to eat things such as leashes, crate pad foams, towels, shoes, etc. I'm not saying chewing, I'm saying eating. And if you're not home, you won't be there to take him to the emergency to get it to vomit it out. (Happened to me.)

I'm not saying don't get a puppy. All I'm saying is these are some things that no one tells you about. So you might have to do some rearranging of schedules for the 1st half a year of its life. Because if you're both not in the house for 8 hours of the day, potty training will take a lot longer. Forget about getting good sleep. Oops, I just went back and reread your posting. You've had dogs before. This will be your first GSD. OK. Anyway, keep doing your research.
 

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Either line can work for you, just be clear with the breeder about your plans for the pup and your lifestyle.

Maybe get a slightly older pup if puppy will be alone for 8+ hours.

Another vote for crate training, here. Get a big one with an internal divider so you can adjust the space available as puppy grows. Besides giving pup a nice cozy den, it’s better for everyone if you contain a puppy when you’re not home to supervise.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Either line can work for you, just be clear with the breeder about your plans for the pup and your lifestyle.

Maybe get a slightly older pup if puppy will be alone for 8+ hours.

Another vote for crate training, here. Get a big one with an internal divider so you can adjust the space available as puppy grows. Besides giving pup a nice cozy den, it’s better for everyone if you contain a puppy when you’re not home to supervise.
Good idea on the divider will definitely check into that thanks.
We were more so thinking right as a pup at 8weeks but considering waiting a little more maybe 10-12 weeks?
Another thing to consider is doggy daycare if available by you.
Girlfriend was looking into that, we might do it for the first little bit.
There are show lines that are high drive dogs too. You shouldn't limit yourself to just working lines. My 2nd GSD is a working line. He's a handful. I hope you realize what you're asking for. They're not just dogs. They're "extra" dogs.

I agree with others about crate training. My pup loves his crate. Leaving it out in an area will give you more problems than you think. If it's a chewer, plan on replacing your kitchen cabinets or kitchen floors. A toy is not going to be enough for a pup's interest for 8 hours. Most pups lose interest in a toy in minutes. If it likes to eat poop, that will be a problem since you won't be home for 8 hours. And if it doesn't, it will stink up the house like you wouldn't believe. Just like McGloomy said above, finding accidents becomes very stressful. Some pups, like mine, like to eat things such as leashes, crate pad foams, towels, shoes, etc. I'm not saying chewing, I'm saying eating. And if you're not home, you won't be there to take him to the emergency to get it to vomit it out. (Happened to me.)

I'm not saying don't get a puppy. All I'm saying is these are some things that no one tells you about. So you might have to do some rearranging of schedules for the 1st half a year of its life. Because if you're both not in the house for 8 hours of the day, potty training will take a lot longer. Forget about getting good sleep. Oops, I just went back and reread your posting. You've had dogs before. This will be your first GSD. OK. Anyway, keep doing your research.
Oh trust me I know the accidents all too well. Aside from just being old what really made it clear to us when we put down our last dog was when she lost control of her bladder and bowels. She was 15 so for the last few years she had a hard time with stairs so we would carry her. Originally she just had a hard time and would sometimes fall so we would just carry her but in the last year she just couldn't do them at all. It was terrible. At night when heading up to bed go to pick her up and realize she's all wet cause she peed and didn't even wake up, sometimes she'd get up and start walking and just start pooping. It was terrible, it started as maybe once a week she'd have an accident to eventually daily sometimes multiple times a day, we knew it was time.

Well done for taking the time to prepare. You wrote the times you and your partner leave home, but what are the times you two are back home? If you adopt a pup between 2-6 months, chances are potty training will be hard on you since the pup will be alone for a period of time 5 days a week. Pups between 2-3 months HAVE to go every 2-3 hours, 3-4 months 3-4 hours, 5-6 months 4-5 hours. One of the toughest part of having a young pup is the potty training, at least for me. Finding 'accidents' around the house is NEVER pleasant, it takes a toll on people.

Do you plan on getting a young pup? Or how old?

Working lines don't necessarily mean they have out of control energy to spare, it really depends on the dog. How active are you? I'm a relatively active person, I can provide the physical demands of a working GSD. So take that as a consideration as well.

If you get a showline from a reputable and responsible breeder, chances are they have warranty on their health.

Personally, I think energy wise is in accordance to age than the line itself. Yes, show lines can be not as sporty or energetic as working lines. But again, all depends on the dog.
Sorry thought I mentioned that. As I said my hours can change, as of right now and the most common shifts are four 8hr days and a 5.5hr Friday. So Mon-Thursday I'm home by 3 15pm the latest, and By 12 30 on Fridays. But we could change to four 9hour days so I'd be home later but have that friday off. Or rarely five 7.5hour days so home at the same time each day. We don't always start at 6am technically not supposed to but when on a small enough job we can get away with it. When starting later the mornings aren't an issue. Girlfriend is 8 30-5pm so she's home later but off every 3rd Friday.

We were thinking right as a pup to enjoy the puppy time as well but starting to consider maybe get a pup thats a little older maybe 3-4months maybe?
 

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I got my Beau at 12 weeks and we still had the beginnings of a good bond within a week. I know this because the day I picked him up, even though he liked us (we’d met a few times before), he totally freaked out after we left the breeder, and cried a lot the rest of that night. But when we went back for some training the following week, 7 days later, he was happy to see her and happy to leave, couldn’t wait to get in the car and come home when the time came. So 12 weeks is still plenty young enough to bond quickly.

On day 1 he was already very nearly house trained, and that was all done soon after he moved in. He learned pretty quickly to inhibit his bite on humans. By night 3 he could sleep through the night without a potty break, though I had to get him outside 1st I mean very 1st thing in the morning. He could be safely left alone at home in his crate for 4-5 hours, though luckily I didn’t need to do that very often. He was still a sweet cuddly joy, and less work for sure than an 8 week old. Still a pup, still a lot of time and work as well as fun, but easier.

If s/he has to be alone more than 5 hours, even at 12 weeks your pup would probably do better in a good puppy daycare, but if you hire a walker to come see him/her mid-day, or do that yourself, s/he should adjust fine. If one of you is home at either end of the day so s/he’s not alone more than 5 hours, you might be able to make that work without a sitter. Wear an old t-shirt for several days then drape it over the crate when you leave puppy alone the first time or 2 or more. Recommend one or both of you be home all day at least the first 3 days s/he’s with you, longer if you can swing it.

The pup will still need all your attention for a while when you’re home, but it might be a little easier on you all if you start at 12 instead of 8 weeks.
 

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Do either of you get vacation time? If so, I would see if one of you could take a week or two off right when you get the puppy, then have the other take a week or two off immediately following. The pup should have much better bladder control at that point when you have to go back to work. A dog walker midday will still be a good idea until the puppy gets a bit older.
 

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I got my Beau at 12 weeks and we still had the beginnings of a good bond within a week. I know this because the day I picked him up, even though he liked us (we’d met a few times before), he totally freaked out after we left the breeder, and cried a lot the rest of that night. But when we went back for some training the following week, 7 days later, he was happy to see her and happy to leave, couldn’t wait to get in the car and come home when the time came. So 12 weeks is still plenty young enough to bond quickly.

On day 1 he was already very nearly house trained, and that was all done soon after he moved in. He learned pretty quickly to inhibit his bite on humans. By night 3 he could sleep through the night without a potty break, though I had to get him outside 1st I mean very 1st thing in the morning. He could be safely left alone at home in his crate for 4-5 hours, though luckily I didn’t need to do that very often. He was still a sweet cuddly joy, and less work for sure than an 8 week old. Still a pup, still a lot of time and work as well as fun, but easier.

If s/he has to be alone more than 5 hours, even at 12 weeks your pup would probably do better in a good puppy daycare, but if you hire a walker to come see him/her mid-day, or do that yourself, s/he should adjust fine. If one of you is home at either end of the day so s/he’s not alone more than 5 hours, you might be able to make that work without a sitter. Wear an old t-shirt for several days then drape it over the crate when you leave puppy alone the first time or 2 or more. Recommend one or both of you be home all day at least the first 3 days s/he’s with you, longer if you can swing it.

The pup will still need all your attention for a while when you’re home, but it might be a little easier on you all if you start at 12 instead of 8 weeks.
That might work out pretty good and now that I think of it ya the pup wouldn't be alone 8 hours as girlfriend obviously leaves later than me and I get home early. So maybe 5-6 hours.

And we were thinking at least a week off if not two.

Do either of you get vacation time? If so, I would see if one of you could take a week or two off right when you get the puppy, then have the other take a week or two off immediately following. The pup should have much better bladder control at that point when you have to go back to work. A dog walker midday will still be a good idea until the puppy gets a bit older.
Will consider the dog walker over day care as it's significantly cheaper.
Thought I mentioned above but ya I'd be taking off a week or two.

I work construction. It's up and down I was actually off all summer (4 months) since May just got back to work last week. If it somehow landed during a slow point in work that would be perfect.
But if not we'll definitely consider staggering our time off with the pup to try and get some more time with it.
 

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Yeah, I would probbbably at the least if I were in your situation, a 5 months old. 3-4 months is way too young to be left alone for 8 hours a day.
 

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I'm not sure when owning a puppy became so complicated. All of my puppies were sleeping a full 8 hours by the time they were 12 weeks. If they can go overnight, they can go thru the day. 5-6 hours is definitely ok. That's about the time our puppies were crated from the time we left to the the time someone got back.

Your puppy will get plenty of time with you. Make it quality. Play, train, bond.

I leave the house at 7am and am not home until at least 6pm. All of my dogs are very bonded with me. Time is not an issue if it's quality.
 

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I'm not sure when owning a puppy became so complicated. All of my puppies were sleeping a full 8 hours by the time they were 12 weeks. If they can go overnight, they can go thru the day. 5-6 hours is definitely ok. That's about the time our puppies were crated from the time we left to the the time someone got back.

Your puppy will get plenty of time with you. Make it quality. Play, train, bond.

I leave the house at 7am and am not home until at least 6pm. All of my dogs are very bonded with me. Time is not an issue if it's quality.
Other pups were never an issue just want to be prepared for a GSD. I always hear they are a lot more work as they are much smarter and need more mental stimulation etc.

I can't remember the last time I slept 8hours haha. I'm lucky to sleep 6 even on weekends just can't stay asleep. But that's a good point I guess if they can make it through the night they can make it through the day.
They would definitely be getting lots of attnetion and play once I'm home.
 

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8 hours at night is not the same as 8 hours during the day for bladder control. ADH is at its highest at night or when a dog is dehydrated, decreases a lot at dawn and is low during the day as long as the dog is drinking normally. High levels of ADH suppress the urge to urinate at night unless they drink a *lot* of water in the late evening. For most pups it’s ~12 weeks when their bodies are producing enough ADH to make it through the night.

During the day YMMV with 12 week pups holding their water for 8 hours. I never had to test it with Beau, so I only know what he preferred, which was every 4-5 hours-ish the first few weeks. I’m sure 6 would’ve been fine in a crate, as Jax08 said.
 

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Good idea on the divider will definitely check into that thanks.
We were more so thinking right as a pup at 8weeks but considering waiting a little more maybe 10-12 weeks?

Girlfriend was looking into that, we might do it for the first little bit.

Oh trust me I know the accidents all too well. Aside from just being old what really made it clear to us when we put down our last dog was when she lost control of her bladder and bowels. She was 15 so for the last few years she had a hard time with stairs so we would carry her. Originally she just had a hard time and would sometimes fall so we would just carry her but in the last year she just couldn't do them at all. It was terrible. At night when heading up to bed go to pick her up and realize she's all wet cause she peed and didn't even wake up, sometimes she'd get up and start walking and just start pooping. It was terrible, it started as maybe once a week she'd have an accident to eventually daily sometimes multiple times a day, we knew it was time.


Sorry thought I mentioned that. As I said my hours can change, as of right now and the most common shifts are four 8hr days and a 5.5hr Friday. So Mon-Thursday I'm home by 3 15pm the latest, and By 12 30 on Fridays. But we could change to four 9hour days so I'd be home later but have that friday off. Or rarely five 7.5hour days so home at the same time each day. We don't always start at 6am technically not supposed to but when on a small enough job we can get away with it. When starting later the mornings aren't an issue. Girlfriend is 8 30-5pm so she's home later but off every 3rd Friday.

We were thinking right as a pup to enjoy the puppy time as well but starting to consider maybe get a pup thats a little older maybe 3-4months maybe?
Yeah, I put my old guy down just before X'mas. Same deal as yours. I've mentioned it in other posts. He was battling liver cancer and had a broken leg bone which the vets said not to bother fixing it at his old age. I carried him up and down the stairs and at 98 lbs...tough to do that in the middle of the night when you're half asleep. The fecal incontinence was hard to deal with especially in the middle of the night. And again, I hope you realize what you're getting in a working line shepherd. Since you're both going to be gone for a good portion of the day, the dog will be bored. And a bored dog is a destructive dog especially a high drive dog. Anyway, good luck.
 
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