German Shepherds Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I just adopted a 9mo old female GSD from a friend of a friend, came with papers. She has been praised by everybody who has been with her and her previous owner doesn't want to get rid of her but has to due to living conditions.

Bringing her home: she loves to jump into the vehicle, so far so good. We brought her home and introduced her to my roommates 2 dogs (border collie, german wire haired pointer) and immediately my dog was afraid and barking incessantly. My friend took control of the situation and had the dogs meet each other 1 by one, first being the collie. The collie was showing her who was dominant and put her in her place is what he says. So after a bit of chasing my dog, my dog eventually stopped barking at her and is more accustomed to her and doesn't bark or snarl at her anymore.

After the collie was introduced we let out the other dog, the male german wire hair. He's put the collie in her place back when my roommate brought the collie home a year or so ago. Now, he just couldn't care less. He just sits there while my dog barks at him. He snarls and barks a little bit but he mostly just tries to play or ignores her.

2nd day we let them all out with each other and I guess mine go so scared she ended up jumped the fence and we had to find her.

3rd still trying to socialize. From the beginning my roommate disciplines my dog with a smack when she barks at anything. Not sure if this is the correct way to go about it but I'm less experienced than him so I'm here looking for help.

She seems very protective, but she is getting less so with these 2 dogs being around me. Another thing is she's more following my roommate instead of me, but I guess that has more to do with him giving out discipline and me not so much. I play fetch with her, which is good that she came with that skill so training can be easier for me.

I mostly just threw my thoughts out as they came to me, but I'm new to being an owner of a dog and don't really know what I need to be doing. We feed our dogs dry food in the morning( expensive non-fake grain food) and raw chicken quarters at night.

I want my dog to be loyal and protective of me first, and then others
I also want my dog to be able to: come here, hold, drop it, leave it, look at me among the other basics which I found a good channel on youtube for that tab289 or something I think.

Do I just need to socialize her?

Any advice is appreciated, thank you for your time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Congrats on your new gal.
First things first, your roommate shouldn't discipline the dog for barking. She's brand new, everything is overwhelming, and a smack is still a reaction, albeit a negative one. If she barks, distract her. Get her to do a command (sit/down etc) and then treat/praise for the good behavior. If you can't get her attention, drop something (like a can full of pennies) that makes a noise if she doesn't respond. Ignoring can work, though it takes longer and is frustrating. If she's barking at the other dogs, either remove them from the area, or remove her to where she can't see them any more. Never react, shout, smack for barking. She will associate the smacking with seeing the other dogs - "Oh - there's a new dog! Better greet/warn. - Ouch! Man, seeing another dog means pain!" - Thus reinforces the behavior - she then starts to bark when she sees the dog because she's expecting a smack.

The one who gives out discipline isn't followed because he smacks her, its because he's giving her attention - even negative. You need to get your dog away from the others, into your room maybe, and have a LOT of one-on-one time. For a dog to be loyal, it takes trust and a lot of time - she barely knows you right now.

As for training, if she doesn't know the basics I would HIGHLY recommend a puppy class. That takes you into an environment where she meets other dogs outside of the two you live with, and you get professional help and someone you can ask all your questions of, someone who will be able to see the dog and you work together.

Socialising an older dog is more work, but it can be done. Take her out of the house, get her away from the other two - its great if she starts to get along with them, but introductions to dogs should always be done gradually, preferably not in the house where one of them already lives - that's your new girl invading their place!

Videos online are great, I use them myself, but only as an addition to puppy training. Especially if you're inexperienced, it really is invaluable to have a class where a professional can work with you and your pup. Shop around for a good one, talk to your vet (and get your girl checked up asap to ensure she has no health problems and is up to date on shots) - vets usually can recommend a local trainer they've heard good things about.

Good luck - oh and supervise supervise! Never leave her alone with the other dogs, never, not until you're 100% sure they are calm, friendly and well-disposed towards each other. That could take months. You could end up with a nasty bite wound, or worse - especially if she's jumping the fence to escape. Invest in a crate or pen, and keep her separate, she's still just a baby. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
Ill qualify this with I'm no expert. Just had a bunch of dogs in my life but only one GSD who is about 7.5 months old. In my experience dogs will gravitate to the one who is most assertive/dominant in the home. They look for a leader and provider. Your dog may initially see your roommate in this role being he one who disciplines the other dogs. It's important for you to be the primary person one who feeds your dog, trains obedience, and provides life experiences.

Here's some encouragement for you. My wife and I rescued a couple month old GSD pup back in January. He spent about a month completely ignoring me and paying attention to everyone else. He had a high food drive so I worked obedience into feeding every day three times a day where he had to earn his food by sitting staying outing etc. after he caught up on vaccines I took him out every day for socializing/exercise around a nearby shopping center and playground. Lots of safe new experiences and meeting people and other dogs. Now I'm the only one he takes serious and wants to be around.

We have two other dogs and there was some stress introducing the new dog but they worked it out pretty quick so I can't say much about your dogs other than its promising they haven tried to kill each other. I remember showing my established dogs that I accepted the new one and made sure to show them plenty of attention. I'm pretty sure my old lab was really jealous and insecure for the first two months. Now they're inseparable. Hope things work out for you. Time and patience are very important with a GSD since they don't usually form instant bonds like most other dogs.


Sent from Petguide.com Free App
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,527 Posts
First I'd like to say thank you for taking in a dog that needed a new home. That was very awesome of you. Second I am by no means an expert trainer or behaviorist, I am only going to give you my experiences and what has worked for me and advice that others have given me.

My friend took control of the situation and had the dogs meet each other 1 by one, first being the collie. The collie was showing her who was dominant and put her in her place is what he says. So after a bit of chasing my dog, my dog eventually stopped barking at her and is more accustomed to her and doesn't bark or snarl at her anymore.
That was a very good idea, however I would have introduced the dogs on neutral grounds. Introduce them where your older dogs aren't on their territory like a park or even introduce them and take them for a walk together then let them walk in the house together. Also, NEVER let the other dogs chase your dog. From the sounds of it, your dog was scared. That will only intensify the fear and she may start reacting to that fear. A fear reactive dog is not a dog you probably want due to your limited experience with owning a dog.

2nd day we let them all out with each other and I guess mine go so scared she ended up jumped the fence and we had to find her.
Until your dogs are 100% comfortable with each other, I would not ever leave them alone with one another. Not outside, not inside. Too much can happen when you are not watching them. That even goes for when they are getting along. You should always be there and able to watch them where ever they are. You wouldn't leave 3 toddlers in the backyard alone even if you were inside that house. Same concept.

3rd still trying to socialize. From the beginning my roommate disciplines my dog with a smack when she barks at anything. Not sure if this is the correct way to go about it but I'm less experienced than him so I'm here looking for help.
NO. Simple. Just No. I learned this too when I got my dog. Smacking does NOTHING to help you or the animal. All she knows is that she was barking, somethign that is natural for her, and she got smacked for it. You never ever ever want to smack. Tell your roommate to stop trying to disipline your dog. YOU need to be that one to discipline. And by discipline I mean redirect and positive reinforcement. What she is doing something you don't want, play biting, barking, chasing, etc.. a simple "No!" or word of choice, mine is "enough," then redirect. Give them a chew or toy and take them away fromt he situation. For barking, I never had that problem so it's hard for me to speak with knowledge on it. Just stop smacking your dog. NOT the right answer. Your dog will become obedient out of fear not respect which is the exact opposite of what you want. She needs a strong, disciplined, respectable, and fair leader. That is you.

She seems very protective, but she is getting less so with these 2 dogs being around me. Another thing is she's more following my roommate instead of me, but I guess that has more to do with him giving out discipline and me not so much. I play fetch with her, which is good that she came with that skill so training can be easier for me.
That is exactly right, your roommate is being viewed as the pack leader because he disciplines. wrongly disciplines, but he does. YOU need to be the one training, exercising, feeding, etc. You roommate should still play a role because he lives there and is a part of the "pack" but you should be the one making the calls. Start taking control of YOUR dog.

I mostly just threw my thoughts out as they came to me, but I'm new to being an owner of a dog and don't really know what I need to be doing. We feed our dogs dry food in the morning( expensive non-fake grain food) and raw chicken quarters at night.

I want my dog to be loyal and protective of me first, and then others
I also want my dog to be able to: come here, hold, drop it, leave it, look at me among the other basics which I found a good channel on youtube for that tab289 or something I think.

Do I just need to socialize her?
Don't take this in a negative way but, why would you get a dog with have NO experience with owning one, or at the least doing some research? Especially a dominant breed like the GSD. They are GREAT dogs and you made a wonderful choice, but you HAVE to do your research. Read read read! Search this site for previous threads, search everywhere you can for information. This dog can be the greatest companion you will ever have but you have to treat it appropriately.

The very very first thing I would do is tell your roommate to back off. Not in a mean way but you want to take the time to bond with her. You need to start laying some ground rules for her and starting her on basic obedience. Look up some trainers in your area... NOT a petstore.. an actual dog training facility with qualified dog trainers. Start basic obedience with her. Along with that, exercise. Taking her for walks is a great way to bond with her. Don't let her tug on the leash, have her walk with you. It may take a while but she will get it. Also, crate training is a wonderful tool for you and your dog. Do some searching on that. Titan LOVES his crate. It's his very own place he goes in it all the time. When I have people over or am doing something where he needs to be out of the way, that's where he goes. It's a great toold for you and your dog.

Again, thank you for taking her in, but please please please do some reearch, which seems to be something you realized and why you are now here. Awesome. Take note of what everyone says here, there is some very very knowledgeable people on this forum and they give awesome awesome advice. Also realize that people on here can be very blunt. Take everything with a grain of salt but listen.

Also, pictures are always welcome :)

Hope this helps. I'm sure others will be on here to give more advice. GOod luck and keep us posted!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
pics of her

Here are some pictures of her I just took.

I spent the morning trying to teach her watch, but she had the distraction of her wanting me to throw her ball. she wouldn't pay attention to anything but the ball, but she did do watch a few times when I would hide the ball behind a frisbee and say watch. She would look at me and then I would praise her and throw the ball. If I hid the ball though she would continuously search for it.

She seems to understand some commands, but the consistency is what needs work.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I've been with these other 2 dogs for a year now, so I have somewhat had experience with dogs. I also grew up with my grandparents dog, but as far as training and obedience I'm pretty lacking.

I can probably only say that I've had experience AROUND dogs really then now that I think about. The breed of dog I've wanted for a long time now is a M'loot, but that's something I'll have to wait on. The GSD was my second choice and she just happened to come into my life, so I jumped on the opportunity.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
This is a bad situation. Good intentions, but this will be a problem. You need to separate this puppy from the other dogs in the house and work with her YOURSELF. She needs to learn that you're the most fun and interesting thing in her life. Play with her and train with her. I would not expose a puppy to a strange adult dog who "dominated" her and "put her in her place." Your pup will end up (a) not trusting you; and (b) dog aggressive because of the negative experiences she is having.
I would completely rethink whether you can keep this pup unless you're able to invest the time in learning how to do this correctly. If not, give her away to a responsible owner. This is a disaster waiting to happen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Raw food

I am also curious how much it would cost me per month to do a raw food diet only. Obviously with prices being different everywhere it's somewhat hard to throw down a hard price, but a range would be very helpful.

Also, I am curious about her doing something she wasn't doing when she first got here. She has started scratching in two areas, as well as chewing at those areas. One is on her neck, the other between her upper thigh and midsection joint. She doesn't do it much, just randomly like an itch. I'm not sure if she's got something going on there as far as bugs or what I need to do. She isn't doing it to the point of hurting herself though as I have noticed she will just snarl and chew at it little bit and then she quits and goes back to laying on my bed. Then later she will scratch at the other spot for a few seconds.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
This is a bad situation. Good intentions, but this will be a problem. You need to separate this puppy from the other dogs in the house and work with her YOURSELF. She needs to learn that you're the most fun and interesting thing in her life. Play with her and train with her. I would not expose a puppy to a strange adult dog who "dominated" her and "put her in her place." Your pup will end up (a) not trusting you; and (b) dog aggressive because of the negative experiences she is having.
I would completely rethink whether you can keep this pup unless you're able to invest the time in learning how to do this correctly. If not, give her away to a responsible owner. This is a disaster waiting to happen.
I plan on taking her to some training classes once I find some in my area. I'm looking for obedience classes mostly and maybe some kind of advanced protection class or something to where she will be able to better control her natural instinct to protect.

The other dogs are barely over a year old themselves, and I think aren't quite adult dogs yet. Their mannerisms in playing are somewhat rough though. The collie will yank and chew on the GWP's ear until he starts moaning and she just drags him around. He'll sometimes yelp at her but she does most of the playing. She also teases him with the toys, and he sometimes will give chase but neither of them like having toys in their mouth and neither will fetch.

So this is probably quite unsettling for the new dog as she just runs away when the collie tries to play with her. The collie will also grab the ball after I throw it for my GSD to fetch and she will run around with it playing keep away. She will then drop the ball and growl at my dog if she goes near it, so I have to go grab it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,764 Posts
3rd still trying to socialize. From the beginning my roommate disciplines my dog with a smack when she barks at anything. Not sure if this is the correct way to go about it but I'm less experienced than him so I'm here looking for help.
Every time your roommate speaks...smack him. See how appropriate he thinks that is.

If you want to train a behavior out, then replace it with new one that is desirable. When Jax is barking, I tell her to "show me". She might take me to the window where a neighbors dog is in our yard. She might take me to the crate where the cat is eating because she thinks he's been in there long enough and she want to lick him dish.

Or she might take us to the front door that is wide open and let us know that one of the other dogs is outside loose where she isn't supposed to be and therefore saving her life so she doesn't get hit in the road.

My point is...don't beat her for barking because there might be a time that you want her to alert you. Train her to come get you and show you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Every time your roommate speaks...smack him. See how appropriate he thinks that is.

If you want to train a behavior out, then replace it with new one that is desirable. When Jax is barking, I tell her to "show me". She might take me to the window where a neighbors dog is in our yard. She might take me to the crate where the cat is eating because she thinks he's been in there long enough and she want to lick him dish.

Or she might take us to the front door that is wide open and let us know that one of the other dogs is outside loose where she isn't supposed to be and therefore saving her life so she doesn't get hit in the road.

My point is...don't beat her for barking because there might be a time that you want her to alert you. Train her to come get you and show you.
That's what my thoughts were on the barking, I don't want her to not bark when she needs to. I want her to bark and alert me of something that needs my attention. I don't want her to be afraid of barking, just not barking incessantly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,054 Posts
Every time your roommate speaks...smack him. See how appropriate he thinks that is.

I agree with Jax..


Congratulations on your new kiddo! I would give her some time to get use to you and her new home. My pup at 4.5 months, took a couple weeks before she was really comfortable.
It is super exiciting to get a new dog, but just as much intimidating. Because of all the new responsiblities, commitment, time, energy, money, etc. however if you ARE willing to put all the effort you can into creating an amazing friendship/bond with your new addition- you will be a very happy person and your dog will be happy as well.

I have been using what is called as Clicker training. My girl loves it, responds to it well and learns quickly.

If you want a link to my personal favorite youtube Dog Trainer, here she is!

Kikopup Channel:

kikopup - YouTube


A few good videos to start out with: (most of them will help with some of your current needs in your new addition)

What is clicker training?

How to Train a Dog-dog training clicker:

How to stop unwanted behavior:

Best and fastest way to teach STAY:

How to teach "leave it":

How to teach "Come" when called:


Please watch those! They are worth your time, trust me! I was a big skeptic on clicker training, until i tried it. :)


I do advice you go to the vets to be sure she is healthy and update on shots, etc. You can ask a lot of medical questions there too, to put your mind at ease.

The itching: food allergies? fleas? Stress? Or could be anything.. I would show the vet that too when you are taking her for a physical.

Some things that really help your dog bond to you that i can think of at the top of my head are:
_ Taking them for walks, playing with them, exercising them,etc.
_ Sleeping in the same bedroom as you
_ Feeding them
_ Obediance - Patience is the key! And if she isnt doing what are you asking, its because your asking too much (so you need to go a step back to where she can be successful), she is getting bored/tired of the obediance training or she simply doesnt understand what your asking her to do- because you did not show her correctly or clearly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,933 Posts
I can't get past the 'when she barks my roommate smacks her around'. Get rid of the roommate or get rid of the dog and in the meantime as Jax said, smack him everytime he smacks the dog, or better yet everytime he opens his mouth. He doesn't know what he is doing and he is abusing the dog. It never ceases to amaze me how some people treat animals.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
I plan on taking her to some training classes once I find some in my area. I'm looking for obedience classes mostly and maybe some kind of advanced protection class or something to where she will be able to better control her natural instinct to protect.

The other dogs are barely over a year old themselves, and I think aren't quite adult dogs yet. Their mannerisms in playing are somewhat rough though. The collie will yank and chew on the GWP's ear until he starts moaning and she just drags him around. He'll sometimes yelp at her but she does most of the playing. She also teases him with the toys, and he sometimes will give chase but neither of them like having toys in their mouth and neither will fetch.

So this is probably quite unsettling for the new dog as she just runs away when the collie tries to play with her. The collie will also grab the ball after I throw it for my GSD to fetch and she will run around with it playing keep away. She will then drop the ball and growl at my dog if she goes near it, so I have to go grab it.
I'm sorry...but this is not going to end well. Obedience or "advanced protection?" You have to first learn how to live with the dog in a way that lays the groundwork for having a clear-headed, balanced dog, and you're not doing that. So far from you've told us she's been exposed to a roommate that smacks dogs (note: this person should not own ANY dog if he uses that method of physical punishment), and two other dogs that bully her. I would talk to an experienced trainer and think about whether you're equipped to have her in a home with a goofy roommate and his two dogs, which based on how he treats them probably have a host of "issues" of their own. I'm sorry, I don't mean to be harsh, but when I hear stories like this one I just shake my head and feel sorry for the dog...I know what's coming....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
457 Posts
I think you also have to keep in mind that this dog has only been with you for a very short time. Have her on a lead and keep her close to you a lot. Don't let anyone hit her. She has just been put in a new home and all Give her some time. And the Tab videos are a great way to train. You can also learn a lot on this site
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
Disregard my last post. Sent before I was done. Anyway... Congratulations on your new dog. You're obviously proud and love her very much or you wouldn't be here asking for constructive advise. I think you're on the right track incorporating training into her high play drive.


Sent from Petguide.com Free App
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top