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Discussion Starter #1
My vet recommended a low protein diet as part of a plan to deal with some behavioral issues. He said it should be 20 percent or less protein. All the ones I have found have very low fat too because they are senior dog foods.

Does anyone have any recommendations for a high quality food with 20 percent protein or less, but a normal level of fat?

I am not looking to get into a discussion over whether the vet's recommendation is correct. I went to the best veterinary behaviorist in my area, and I trust his judgment.
 

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There are some that I can think of that come close to what you are looking for - 21% or 22% protein, though I'm not sure what percent fat you are looking for. The foods I'm thinking of are all around 10-12% fat. Would those levels be ok for you?
 

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I have to watch Woolf's protein intake for the same reasons. Nature's Recipe has several different formula that will fit your criteria. Woolf is doing great on it, coat and skin is good.

edited to change that from several to the Lamb and Rice will fit your criteria of 20%. The 'Easy to Digest' is 21%.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
There are some that I can think of that come close to what you are looking for - 21% or 22% protein, though I'm not sure what percent fat you are looking for. The foods I'm thinking of are all around 10-12% fat. Would those levels be ok for you?
I guess I am just looking to get as close to 20 percent as possible with as high a fat level I can find. If 12% is as high as I can find, it will have to do. I may have to supplement with salmon oil or something else. My problem is that my dogs have skin issues, along with the behavior issues.

Which ones do you suggest?

Edit: I should have thought to look at your spreadsheet. I see some on it which may work.
 

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Avoderm' Grain Free Salmon and Potato formula is 22/12. California Natural Herring and Sweet Potato and Grain Free Kangaroo and Red Lentil formulas are both 21/11. Both of the Go! Sensitivity + Shine formulas are 22/12. Natural Balance's LID formulas are all around 20-21/10. Pinnacle Trout and Sweet Potato is 22/10. Pioneer Naturals has a few formulas that are 22/10. Precise Sensicare is 22/12 and Precise Plus Lamb Meal and Sweet Potato is 22/12.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Avoderm' Grain Free Salmon and Potato formula is 22/12. California Natural Herring and Sweet Potato and Grain Free Kangaroo and Red Lentil formulas are both 21/11. Both of the Go! Sensitivity + Shine formulas are 22/12. Natural Balance's LID formulas are all around 20-21/10. Pinnacle Trout and Sweet Potato is 22/10. Pioneer Naturals has a few formulas that are 22/10. Precise Sensicare is 22/12 and Precise Plus Lamb Meal and Sweet Potato is 22/12.
Thanks so much. This gives me a lot of choices. I have Twyla's suggestion of Nature's Recipe, and have found a Premium Edge one with 21/12.
 

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I dont want to start a fight here however dont you find it odd that the vet is blaming food for behavior issues?

Ive worked with many dogs with "behavior issues" and the common thing they all have is that they all do have alot of energy their looking to get out. If your dog has behavior issues give the dog a job (load up a doggie backpack) and take him/her for a nice long walk or two.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I dont want to start a fight here however dont you find it odd that the vet is blaming food for behavior issues?

Ive worked with many dogs with "behavior issues" and the common thing they all have is that they all do have alot of energy their looking to get out. If your dog has behavior issues give the dog a job (load up a doggie backpack) and take him/her for a nice long walk or two.
I took two of my dogs, who are fighting, to Dr. Rivard, the head of Cornell University's veterinary behavioral clinic. He is a member of the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists, and has a PhD in neuroscience. Like I said, I trust his judgment.

He is not blaming the issues on the food. As part of the treatment plan, he recommended low protein dog food. He referred to Dr. Nicholas Dodson's studies on the effects of high protein on territorial aggression. Dr. Dodman is the head of Tuffs University's behavioral clinic. I figure Dr. Rivard, and Dr. Dodman know a lot more than I do about dog behavior, so I will take their advice.
 

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Low Protein

I'm also looking for a low-protein food for my GSD puppy... I currently have him on California Natural Grain Free Venison Meal which he seems to enjoy, but I've heard now that P&G owns Natura, California Natural is no longer a great food source for him. I want to feed him the best, and he definitely needs a low-protein diet of around 20-25%. If he has anything higher than that he has loose stool and will not eat. Any suggestions welcome!
 

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I dont want to start a fight here however dont you find it odd that the vet is blaming food for behavior issues?

Ive worked with many dogs with "behavior issues" and the common thing they all have is that they all do have alot of energy their looking to get out. If your dog has behavior issues give the dog a job (load up a doggie backpack) and take him/her for a nice long walk or two.
Just saw this and would like to reply.

As you said, many dogs with issues are just bored......however that isn't the case with all of them. If exercising them, giving them jobs, taking for walks and all the many other things done to exercise these dogs brains would fix the problem; I, along with many on here would have perfectly behaved GSD.

As for food being blamed, I didn't see where it is blamed, but in aggression cases higher levels of protein can cause a quicker reaction time and a higher level of aggression. So no, I don't find it odd that the vet made this suggestion. Even more impressed the vet didn't use the fall back and say s/n and it will fix the problem.
 

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I'm also looking for a low-protein food for my GSD puppy... I currently have him on California Natural Grain Free Venison Meal which he seems to enjoy, but I've heard now that P&G owns Natura, California Natural is no longer a great food source for him. I want to feed him the best, and he definitely needs a low-protein diet of around 20-25%. If he has anything higher than that he has loose stool and will not eat. Any suggestions welcome!
Canidae lamb and rice All Stages is 21% protein and 12.5% fat. The calcium though is 1.7% :/. I haven't seen any issues with my 9 month old though and the vet just gave him a clean bill of health. He's been on Canidae for 4 months now.
 

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I'm also looking for a low-protein food for my GSD puppy... I currently have him on California Natural Grain Free Venison Meal which he seems to enjoy, but I've heard now that P&G owns Natura, California Natural is no longer a great food source for him. I want to feed him the best, and he definitely needs a low-protein diet of around 20-25%. If he has anything higher than that he has loose stool and will not eat. Any suggestions welcome!
There are a whole slew of suggestions for alternative low protein foods here in this thread. In my opinion, if your dog does well on the California Naturals I would continue to feed it. P&G bough Natura quite some time ago, and thus far I don't believe there have been any real changes in their foods. They still are manufactured in the same facility they were prior to P&G's purchase of the company, they still have excellent customer service, and as far as I have seen, none of their formulas have changed for the worse.

Sure, they just had a recall, but it was a voluntary recall and handled quite well, in my opinion. Recalls happen in all food industries, it's just the nature of the food industry unfortunately. As long as you stay abreast of what is happening by subscribing to newsletters and/or reading forums like this, recalls are just a bump in the road that happens (and it happens to many, many companies). As long as the company handles it well, and is honest about it, I don't really see it as a reason to shun them ... just my opinion though.
 

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Another option is you can supplement your dog's food in order to decrease the overall protein level/increase the fat. You could probably ask your vet about the best way to do this.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
There are a whole slew of suggestions for alternative low protein foods here in this thread. In my opinion, if your dog does well on the California Naturals I would continue to feed it. P&G bough Natura quite some time ago, and thus far I don't believe there have been any real changes in their foods. They still are manufactured in the same facility they were prior to P&G's purchase of the company, they still have excellent customer service, and as far as I have seen, none of their formulas have changed for the worse.

Sure, they just had a recall, but it was a voluntary recall and handled quite well, in my opinion. Recalls happen in all food industries, it's just the nature of the food industry unfortunately. As long as you stay abreast of what is happening by subscribing to newsletters and/or reading forums like this, recalls are just a bump in the road that happens (and it happens to many, many companies). As long as the company handles it well, and is honest about it, I don't really see it as a reason to shun them ... just my opinion though.
I agree with this. Stick with what is working for you. California Naturals is a good food. I ended up going with Premium Edge Senior/4Health Mature. But I needed to get to 20 percent or less.

If it ain't broke, don't fix it.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Just saw this and would like to reply.

As you said, many dogs with issues are just bored......however that isn't the case with all of them. If exercising them, giving them jobs, taking for walks and all the many other things done to exercise these dogs brains would fix the problem; I, along with many on here would have perfectly behaved GSD.

As for food being blamed, I didn't see where it is blamed, but in aggression cases higher levels of protein can cause a quicker reaction time and a higher level of aggression. So no, I don't find it odd that the vet made this suggestion. Even more impressed the vet didn't use the fall back and say s/n and it will fix the problem.
Exactly. My one female occasionally wants to kill my other female. A long walk won't fix that. I know the food is not a magic pill, but changing the diet in combination with behavior modification might help. If not, they will have to remain separated. By the way, we accidentally let them both out into the back yard together, and they left each other alone.
 
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