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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited by Moderator)
My pet Rambo is diagnosed with hernia in the anal area. The tumour has grown quiet big and is now the size of two human fists. He is 10yrs and isn't in pain neither does he show any signs of pain while he defecates. But this problem came four years back. The doctor says it's risky to operate on an old dog. He's active and eats properly. I can't figure out what to do! His tumour keeps growing!
I am attaching a picture for reference! Would really appreciate any help!
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Could the vet not have operated 4 years ago when your dog was 6 years of age?

Any operation on a 10 year old dog is risky.

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A tumour and a hernia are not the same thing. I see you are in India and veterinary service varies widely. If you can take him to a veterinary school at a university they can explain the difference and discuss treatment options.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
A tumour and a hernia are not the same thing. I see you are in India and veterinary service varies widely. If you can take him to a veterinary school at a university they can explain the difference and discuss treatment options.
I have consulted different doctors. They just asked us to take care of him and not let his stools become too hard. I ll look for vets and University but there's none in my hometown. Thanks so much for the help
 

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Is this a PERINEAL hernia? It is a collapse of the pelvic diaphragm, which then causes internal displacement of the rectum. At the same time, the prostate usually grows -- I wonder if that's what you are calling a "tumor"? This article explains more about it:

If that is what your dog has, it's very difficult surgery, requiring a highly skilled veterinary surgeon (not a regular, general-practice vet) -- in the U.S., we have to go to a specialist to do this surgery, and it costs US$2,000-$3,000. I was told it's life threatening not to do it. It's primarily a problem in older, intact male dogs --neutering is essential to take down the size of the prostate, which is usually involved.

As to whether to do it on a 10 year old dog, I think it depends on the health of the dog, and your access to a highly skilled surgeon. You weigh the dog's quality of life (and possibly shortened lifespan) with no treatment, vs. the risk of dying during surgery/anesthesia, with a chance at improved quality of life and an longer life with successful surgery. That balance may come out differently with different dogs, and different owner circumstances.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Is this a PERINEAL hernia? It is a collapse of the pelvic diaphragm, which then causes internal displacement of the rectum. At the same time, the prostate usually grows -- I wonder if that's what you are calling a "tumor"? This article explains more about it:

If that is what your dog has, it's very difficult surgery, requiring a highly skilled veterinary surgeon (not a regular, general-practice vet) -- in the U.S., we have to go to a specialist to do this surgery, and it costs US$2,000-$3,000. I was told it's life threatening not to do it. It's primarily a problem in older, intact male dogs --neutering is essential to take down the size of the prostate, which is usually involved.

As to whether to do it on a 10 year old dog, I think it depends on the health of the dog, and your access to a highly skilled surgeon. You weigh the dog's quality of life (and possibly shortened lifespan) with no treatment, vs. the risk of dying during surgery/anesthesia, with a chance at improved quality of life and an longer life with successful surgery. That balance may come out differently with different dogs, and different owner circumstances.
Thank you and yes that is a perinial hernia. After multiple visits to different vets all over the city, I can say most of them suggest not to operate at all. While the others simply gave up on the thought of operating on him. It's like you said they aren't skilled enough maybe. I am in a dilemma of what should be done if he can't be operated upon? The only concern now is to lessen his suffering. Now that I am know he can't be operated upon, I have to know what I can do to ensure he's not in pain.
 
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