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About 2-3 weeks ago I enlisted the help of fellow forum members because my now 11 week old pup did'nt want to go for a walk. He would just sit in the driveway & not budge. After following the advise of members I was able to overcome that problem within a day or so.
Now the opposite! When I take 11 week old Diego for a walk he lunges ahead & pulls on the leash. I tried quick jerks back on the leash but it seems to make no impression on him. This pulling forward lessens after about 10 minutes as he gets tired. Any suggestions?
I walk him 15 minutes in the morning & 15 at night before bed.
 

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Have you enrolled him in basic obidence class yet? If not, it's time. He is only going to get bigger and stronger.
 

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I know I also had leash pulling issues so just decided to not leash my pups until I had my classes start. Instead, I found areas I could drive to then go for long hikes in the woods with the leash on the pup only while clearing the parking area.

Great time to bond with my pup. I brought tons of treats/toys to practice calling her name and rewarding when she came. And I was also really able to tire her out and bring home a perfect puppy.

Frankly, after about 12 weeks, a couple of leashed 15 minute walks a day would not have tired out my puppy at all..... so I had to up the level.
 

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When he runs ahead of you and pulls, reverse and go the opposite direction. He'll turn and try to get ahead. Repeat .. you may feel like you're a bit dizzy for a day or two, but he'll get the idea that running ahead and pulling will not win the lead position for him.

You can also simply stop and hold your place until he gives up pulling and returns to your side.

Patience, he'll get it.

Soon that 'jerk' on the lead will signal to him that's he's gone too far.
 

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I had the same problem with my GSD when he was about 4-6 months old. My breeder suggested a put a pronged collar on him, high and tight, and when he pulls jerk it hard enough so he yelps.

A few jerks, and he has been perfect ever since.
 

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NO PRONG ON A PUPPY!!! Too punishing for a little tyke, even if they aren't that "little". You don't want to inhibit their sense of fun and playfulness by associating high spirits with painful punishment. All the previous advice can work very well, it just takes consistency and good timing. Wait until puppy is at least six months old before using a prong, if that is what you wish to use. Their is NO need to jerk on it so hard that your dog yelps. That is not training, but excessive force. I use a prong on my 4 year old. She can be very obstinate and was a challenge to train, but I have NEVER had to jerk on it so hard as to make her yelp. She respects the prong, and at times she needs a quick prong correction, but if she yelps, I know I've over done it. Then I'M the bad one, not the dog.

What really made a big difference for my dog was getting her into a reward-based obediance training. Her mind-set changed from fighting me, to wanting to please me, because, HEY!!! TREATS!!!

Your guy is still very young for formal training, but you can start bringing treats along and when he is walking nicely by your side, praise him and reward him. If he ever, on his own, comes to your side and walks on a loose leash during a walk, praise and treat like crazy! At this age, you want to shape and mold behaviour with positive associations, not inhibit "normal" puppy energy with punishment.
 

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I agree, I don’t think I'd use a prong on a puppy until he was closer to 6 months old. Not sure that they even make them small enough for 11 week olds. (Do they?)

For now, when your puppy is this young, I’d focus on things such as name recognition, sit, stay, come, down, etc. Walking him is fine but at this age use redirection and try to make walking a fun game. Remember he’s just like a child right now. At this age, I look at things as more of a kindergarten training phase. Very basic and not expecting perfection.
 

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Originally Posted By: Timber1I had the same problem with my GSD when he was about 4-6 months old. My breeder suggested a put a pronged collar on him, high and tight, and when he pulls jerk it hard enough so he yelps.

A few jerks, and he has been perfect ever since.
Timber1,

You talk a great deal about the way to rehabbing "aggressive" fosters is to be kind to them. This kind of treatment you've described is cruel. Please do not do it. There are much better ways to train your dog. This is exactly why I hate prong collars. Don't get me wrong--I have used them with all of my dogs up until Kai, but this whole idea we need to cause the dog pain in order to get them to be "obedient" disgusts me.

I agree that all of the other methods posted are a much better way to build a good relationship with your puppy.
 

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Please don't put a prong collar on a baby. I own two and used them from adolescence until they could walk nicely on lead. But they aren't for such a young puppy.

Try a harness instead. It's a good thing to train him in anyway, good for securing him in the car and good for swimming in places where you'll have to haul him out. My girl has been harness trained since she was a puppy. For her, harness=going somewhere fun so she puts it on happily.
 

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I do not disagree with any of your comments. However, I do not remember how old and how much Timber weighted when I used a pronged collar. He may have been about 80pounds and closer to one year old.

Timber is a very strong European GSD. When it came to chasing humans, expecially those on bikes I had trouble controlling him. On one walk, using a pronged collar resolved that issue, and the use of the collar was recommended by my breeder who has been around since the age of thirteen, and is now 38. As you may have seen inprior posts, Timber also went after a few people, and the last thing I needed was to have him actually bite someone.

I hired a behavior specialist and also relied on advice from this board and my breeder. In Timber's case the pronged collar was very effective.

In your post you actually mentioned you have used prong collars, so why were you right and I was wrong. My hunch is I may have been inaccurate regarding Timber's age; he may have been older.

Rehabbing aggressive foster's is so different. These dogs have been kicked around enough. and the last thing they need is so called tough training. They need to settle and be treated kindly.

I do appreciate your comments, thanks
 

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This pup sounds much too young for a prong collar. I'm not opposed to prongs, but start with the gentlest training methods & use harsher methods only when the kind&gentle approach clearly isn't working.

Aggression issues are entirely different than routine training, regardless of whether the aggression is rooted in fear, dominance or predatory drives. Improper handling can literally be life threatening to both humans & dogs.
 

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The reverse direction is good advice. Sometimes when I walk Juli she knows the path we are going and if I don't follow the same path in the morning she tries to tug me in the direction that we usually go. I just wait her out and encourage her to walk my way. Also if I turn my back and walk she will follow me. I use a 25' leash that I real in and let out so she can chase leaves, flowers in the wind which she loves to do, and the ducks (just kidding). Also on the long leash if she gets fixated on something and I keep walking when I get to the end of the leash she will look up and then run to catch up.

Glenn
 

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Just had an update from my friend who has a crazy pulling young German Shorthair Pointer. She got a gentle leader HARNESS and says it's been like a miracle.

So for the younger pups I was reluctant to get a prong on, I'm thinking these harnesses may be the way to go.
 

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MRL,

I recommend the Sense-ation harness. The Gentle Leader harness is called the Easy Walk harness but the Sense-ation is better made and they really stand by their products--even if your dog eats them!
 

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BowWowMeow, sounds good to me! Whatever helps make the walk a joy instead of 'work' is a good idea to me. Specially for the puppies. I know I start to get angry when they don't listen and keep pulling, even though I know 'angry' is not a good training place to be!

So harnesses for all puppies!!!!! (not regular harnesses, but these special ones).
 
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