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Discussion Starter #1
Hi GSD Fans!

I'm looking for a lighter Gold/Tan slash Silver/Light short-haired Male Sable GSD (preferably show line?) I don't need a dog of military/bomb-squad caliber that's constantly searching for squirrels rather a loyal companion that'll accompany me on endless adventures

I'll add context, please don't try and dissuade my search as I'm here for help on breeder info!
  • I'm a 31-year old working male that's single, living out of SF (small apartment, yes)
  • Don't worry about pet-friendly apts/SF restricted breeds (ESA papers)
  • No kids, no other pets. Had a house chow chow in college and a family-raised White GSD back in high school. (not my first GSD)
  • Am able to spend at minimum 1.5 hours walking it around the city, daily.. on average 2-2.5/day on weekdays
  • Weekends, i'll run a few errands and then spend the majority of the afternoon exploring, lounging, venturing
  • I believe in discipline and rigor, training will be lifelong, and I plan to train off & on-leash
I've scoured the internet for the past month, compiling a prescriptive list of breeders contact information. I have multiple threads running with them and have been reading up on everything GSD

It's a lot to manage and there's an endless supply of information. Ideally, I'd like to pick one up in August/Sept. Stole two pictures off of the internet, first is a lighter/silver sable.. second a darker gold/tan sable.

Two perfect pictures! Please help, thank you in advance!

560385


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Sable pups are like fun, furry little puzzles that reveal themselves bit by bit. They change as they grow. General advice is to focus on everything but color when searching for a pup. Temperament and health need to take priority.
I believe your area has several rescues and realistically if you are seeking a specific look they are a better bet. You can avoid all the puppy craziness and get exactly the dog you are looking for.
Show lines produce fewer sables the working lines, so that may make finding one trickier.
@dogfaeries I believe mentioned a breeder that does have sables but I have no clue where.
The other issue is going to be that you want one basically now. Most good breeders have waiting lists. You may need to find a breeder you like and just get on a wait list.
What you want is doable, it just may take time.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Sable pups are like fun, furry little puzzles that reveal themselves bit by bit. They change as they grow. General advice is to focus on everything but color when searching for a pup. Temperament and health need to take priority.
I believe your area has several rescues and realistically if you are seeking a specific look they are a better bet. You can avoid all the puppy craziness and get exactly the dog you are looking for.
Show lines produce fewer sables the working lines, so that may make finding one trickier.
@dogfaeries I believe mentioned a breeder that does have sables but I have no clue where.
The other issue is going to be that you want one basically now. Most good breeders have waiting lists. You may need to find a breeder you like and just get on a wait list.
What you want is doable, it just may take time.
I’d like to take one home as soon as I’m able to, heard that’s anywhere between 10-12 weeks, is this accurate?

also, timeline can be aug/sept.. I’m open to flying across the country to pick one up.

with all the GSD breeders across the country, is there a realistic timeframe I should be shooting for?
 

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Well first we need to find you a breeder. Then we can figure out timelines. The German show lines are unlikely to produce sables, I figured you were talking American show lines? Is there a reason for wanting SL or just because everyone says working lines can't be pets?
 

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Well first we need to find you a breeder. Then we can figure out timelines. The German show lines are unlikely to produce sables, I figured you were talking American show lines? Is there a reason for wanting SL or just because everyone says working lines can't be pets?
Can working lines be relaxed pets? I have a smaller apartment in SF and can take my dog on walks and to the park. Will continue to train but Protection? Highly unlikely.
 

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Can working lines be relaxed pets? I have a smaller apartment in SF and can take my dog on walks and to the park. Will continue to train but Protection? Highly unlikely.
Either would be a good fit, IF you spend the time finding the right breeder, put the work in as a pup and ensure that the dogs needs are met.
But, we have found a breeder who has sables. So let's start there.
Something I did want to mention because you brought it up and life happens. Do ensure that you expose a pup to children. Far to many dogs are surrendered because children came along.
 

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I’d like to take one home as soon as I’m able to, heard that’s anywhere between 10-12 weeks, is this accurate?

also, timeline can be aug/sept.. I’m open to flying across the country to pick one up.

with all the GSD breeders across the country, is there a realistic timeframe I should be shooting for?
Are you saying you want to bring a puppy home in 10-12 weeks, or that you’ve heard that’s the typical age a puppy comes home at? It’s honestly pretty rare to find a reputable breeder and bring home a puppy within a few months. It can happen, like if a breeder has someone back out last minute or if they end up with a bigger litter than they anticipated, but again, that’s rare. It’s much more common to be waiting 6+ months for a puppy, especially now since everyone and their mother wants a puppy.

A working line dog absolutely can be a great pet. They don’t need you to work them in protection. I have my “first” shepherd pup right now, and he’s a working line. I will not be doing any kind of bite sports with him. He’s amazing in the house so long as his needs are met, and honestly, I wouldn’t worry about not having a yard. I have a fenced yard, but my dog is literally never out there alone, and he has less than zero interest in playing by himself. If we’re outside, I’m engaging with him. You can get this by just going to the park or going for a walk. My backyard is pretty useless to me.
 

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American show lines have lighter sables.

IMO, 1.5 miles of "walking" is not exercise for a shepherd. They need mental stimulation and engagement. If you can't provide that, perhaps you should consider a different breed.

From your statements, I think you need to research the breed more and find clubs (either IPO or AKC) to be around the dogs and see for yourself what they require. It's June - everyone and their brother is looking for puppies right now. I would be surprised if you can get one in August/Sept. That means the litter is currently bred and everyone wants a puppy right now. Breeders should not be breeding working lines for "relaxed pets". These are not supposed to be low drive couch potatoes. Good Luck in your search..
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Are you saying you want to bring a puppy home in 10-12 weeks, or that you’ve heard that’s the typical age a puppy comes home at? It’s honestly pretty rare to find a reputable breeder and bring home a puppy within a few months. It can happen, like if a breeder has someone back out last minute or if they end up with a bigger litter than they anticipated, but again, that’s rare. It’s much more common to be waiting 6+ months for a puppy, especially now since everyone and their mother wants a puppy.

A working line dog absolutely can be a great pet. They don’t need you to work them in protection. I have my “first” shepherd pup right now, and he’s a working line. I will not be doing any kind of bite sports with him. He’s amazing in the house so long as his needs are met, and honestly, I wouldn’t worry about not having a yard. I have a fenced yard, but my dog is literally never out there alone, and he has less than zero interest in playing by himself. If we’re outside, I’m engaging with him. You can get this by just going to the park or going for a walk. My backyard is pretty useless to me.
I appreciate you sharing this, I've done a tone of research on it and have spoken with multiple breeders who have mentioned the same thing. As long as they're taken out regularly and exercised physically and mentally, the size of the home is for the most-part irrelevant.

I'm saying I've heard that the typical age upon receipt is around 10-12 weeks of age. Like the majority of others out there, I'd like to take it home as soon as possible and ideally the end of August/Sept works perfectly.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Of course, working lines can be great pets given the right amount of mental and physical stimulation as well as training. My girl is a working line and she's great

Would love if you can expand on the right amount of mental and physical stimulation, what does the average amount of interaction look like at 6 months, 1-2 years, 3-5+ years?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
American show lines have lighter sables.

IMO, 1.5 miles of "walking" is not exercise for a shepherd. They need mental stimulation and engagement. If you can't provide that, perhaps you should consider a different breed.

From your statements, I think you need to research the breed more and find clubs (either IPO or AKC) to be around the dogs and see for yourself what they require. It's June - everyone and their brother is looking for puppies right now. I would be surprised if you can get one in August/Sept. That means the litter is currently bred and everyone wants a puppy right now. Breeders should not be breeding working lines for "relaxed pets". These are not supposed to be low drive couch potatoes. Good Luck in your search..
Cool. Thanks.
 

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Would love if you can expand on the right amount of mental and physical stimulation, what does the average amount of interaction look like at 6 months, 1-2 years, 3-5+ years?
She gets two 1 hour walks and about 20 minutes of playtime in the yard with her tug. She's 7 months right now and gets lots of exercise both mentally and physically because we work on obedience and tricks throughout the day.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I've reached out to a multitude of different breeders across the country to scope out their upcoming litters and am also willing to have it shipped or fly cross-country to pick up my new buddy, if it makes better sense.

Is there a master list of approved breeders available to the members of this website? There are so many to choose from online, searching online might not be the best route as I continue to browse and the list continues to grow (introducing the dilemma of the paradox of choice), and lastly/most importantly I really am not sure what to look out for.

Obviously temperament, however some posts/articles say working dogs are suitable for family/pet needs. Health (DM, hips, elbows, eyes), bloodline, no BYB's, etc?

I've compiled a list and have emailed/called the below breeders:
Hayes Haus
True Kaus Kennels
Kreative Kennels
K9 Kraftwerk
Fernbrook GSD
Bellevue GSD
West German Shepherd
Wolfgang haus
Grothaus k9
Wendelin Tinka
Vom Banack
Stillwaters in OK

Any help would be appreciated! Thanks for everyones responsiveness!~
 

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Almost all of those are WL breeders. I could be wrong but Stillwaters is the breeder I was thinking of.
@dogfaeries ?
Some of those breeders are going to produce just too much dog I suspect. I will let others weigh in, I don't know enough.
Activity levels differ from dog to dog, but in general the first two years are going to be the worst.
Puppies to about 4 months require supervision constantly, from 4-8 months you will see increased activity and a curious mind that will drive you crazy if not directed, 8-16 months see emerging personality and challenging of rules and boundaries. This is the general time I start any serious training.
From 16-24 months is the time a lot of owners get into trouble as maturity brings breed traits to the fore. If your foundation was shaky this is where it all falls down.
An hour twice a day is workable but understand that it is training, exercise and play that are needed. So not just walking around.
 

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I don't think anyone said a working line is not a suitable pet. But they should not be low drive, couch potatoes content with a walk around town.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Almost all of those are WL breeders. I could be wrong but Stillwaters is the breeder I was thinking of.
@dogfaeries ?
Some of those breeders are going to produce just too much dog I suspect. I will let others weigh in, I don't know enough.
Activity levels differ from dog to dog, but in general the first two years are going to be the worst.
Puppies to about 4 months require supervision constantly, from 4-8 months you will see increased activity and a curious mind that will drive you crazy if not directed, 8-16 months see emerging personality and challenging of rules and boundaries. This is the general time I start any serious training.
From 16-24 months is the time a lot of owners get into trouble as maturity brings breed traits to the fore. If your foundation was shaky this is where it all falls down.
An hour twice a day is workable but understand that it is training, exercise and play that are needed. So not just walking around.
Appreciate the insight here..

Yes, I immediately DM'd @dogfaeries and they mentioned Stillwaters + provided contact info! Thank you both of you.

Appreciate the timeline, its very helpful. If I'm taking them home around 11 weeks, based on the above I'd need constant supervision for the next month or two - is that fair? I'd have a 2-3 hour gap a few days a week where I'd need to run errands. Grocery store, etc. assume I could crate them for a bit to secure the necessities?

Does this work through the 4-8, 6-16 month timeframe?

I consider training to be lifelong and would invest an hour or so at night with mental stimulation, commands, toys, etc. on top of the normal walking/dog park
 

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Young dogs do best with short and frequent training. So think in terms of 5-10 minutes at a time.
Crate training is necessary and yes puppy goes to crate when alone.
Also know that any forced exercise should be minimal for the first year or so. That means anything puppy does on its own is good, anything you make it do is limited.
 
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