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Discussion Starter #1
I am in the process of bringing home a rescued GSD from a high kill Shelter. He was neutered on Friday by the rescue the pulled him from the Shelter on my behalf. This morning when they came in they found a lot of bloody diarrhea in his cage. This is the email they sent me:

I tried to call you just a little bit ago. I wanted you to know that surgery went well and his surgery site looks good. He is heartworm negative. However, this morning when I came in, he had a large amount of bloody diarrhea in his kennel. It was so much that we opted to run a parvo test. The test did come back negative but sometimes that will happen even when an animal is infected. The disease has to currently be shedding to register on the test. I know most people think of parvo as being something only puppies come down with and for the most part that is true but dogs with an unknown health history are at risk as well. We do not know if Diesel has ever had any vaccines. Animal care and control takes in a high volume of animals so the risks of coming into contact with diseases are higher. We are keeping a close eye on him and want our vet to look at him when she returns tomorrow. He may need to be transferred to a regular vet hospital but I do not know if that is necessary just yet. As of right now he is alert and drinking water but he hasn’t eaten very much. If I do not get a chance to talk to you today, I will call you first thing in the AM and give you an update. Please think about whether or not you are willing to pay for treatment if we should have to transfer him.


I have a 8yr old Samoyed (I believe she is vaccinated) and a 19yr old Shiba Inu with many health problems here. From what I am reading I also see that the Parvo virus is / can be linked to the FPV virus in cats which I also have 2 of a 13yr old and a 2yr old. Then there is the treatment for this, I dont know what the cost is or could be but from what I understand it could be anywhere from $1,000 - $10,000 to get him better. Finally I have read that brown and tan breeds such as GSD, Dobermans, Rotties etc have a higher mortality rate from it. There is also info that once infected should be kept away from other dogs for several months as the bacteria and virus can live for up to 9 weeks outside the body of the dog!

So what do I do? I know I have not met this dog but I just saved him on Thursday from certain death and I don't want to give up but I also do not want to risk the health of my other animals.
 

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I would leave him at the vet's until they have a certain diagnosis. I had a Rot years ago that developed parvo. He survived with no lingering affects. He was home with me thru the treatment. We gave antibiotics and fluids--neither were expensive. You would just have to learn to do the fluids yourself--not hard. I don't know what treatments nowdays entail.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I would leave him at the vet's until they have a certain diagnosis. I had a Rot years ago that developed parvo. He survived with no lingering affects. He was home with me thru the treatment. We gave antibiotics and fluids--neither were expensive. You would just have to learn to do the fluids yourself--not hard. I don't know what treatments nowdays entail.
He is 700 miles away from me. I would give the treatments at home but there is no way for me to do so as he is not permitted to travel like this.
 

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But what is your question. I thought you were asking the cost of treating a Parvo dog and if the dog could infect your dogs. The answer is maybe it could infect your dogs depending on their health and antibody titers. Don't worry about your cats.

I just suggested leaving the dog at the vet (or the rescue) until you knew what was wrong. Making a decision without knowing what is actually wrong with the rescue dog is pointless especially since the Parvo test was negative. Maybe he is having problems for the surgery. What are your options? If he can't travel, you will have to leave him at the vet which will be costly or leave him with the rescue group. If they won't keep him, what's left but euthanizing him or offering to help the rescue pay expenses to keep him for a while.
 

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I would not bring a dog that has parvo or is just getting over parvo into a home that has an older dog or a dog under 1 year old. If that dog has bloody poop, I don't see that the test would come back negative at this point. It might be something else. Parvo can be expensive to treat, but it is something that can be done and done successfully. Due to the fact that this dog might not have had shots could be a reason the dog got this, if the dog did get it. Please keep us updated as you find out info. Good Luck.
 

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I am with the others, I would not bring him home until you get a definitive diagnosis.

Since your adopting him, you may be asked to pay the vet bill.

Have you even met this dog? How do you know if he'll get along with your existing animals? Just curious.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I am with the others, I would not bring him home until you get a definitive diagnosis.

Since your adopting him, you may be asked to pay the vet bill.

Have you even met this dog? How do you know if he'll get along with your existing animals? Just curious.

No I have not met him, I rolled the dice completely and planned on taking it slow in order to incorporate him into my pack. He could come with 100's of issues but I was / am willing to take the risk. He deserves a good home and a chance at a good life. I have already contacted a GSD trainer here by me (found here on the forum thanks!) that I planned on working with closely in my home to help him and my fur family adjust. I am just torn now do I pay for the treatments and know that he can carry a residual virus home to my current fur family or worse not make it (if that is the diagnosis) or do I let them euthanize him if that is what it is. I want to do what is right by him as well.
 

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Since the vet is seeing him tomorrow, I'd wait, like I said and would want, a definitive diagnosis..He could possibly just have an irritated bowel..Stress induced, it may not even be parvo or something life threatening..See what the vet says and go from there.

Please keep us updated, hope it works out
 

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Bloody diarrhea can be caused also by a bunch of intestinal parasites as well as by stress. I would not discard the dog because of bloody diarrhea since it can be so many things. Adult dogs recover quickly and your dogs are vaccinated I assume. They can test positive after the combo vaccine, so even a positive test would be questionable. I would not leave a dog in the shelter to die because of bloody diarrhea.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
They called, still no clear answer, thinking it is Parvo (another dog from that shelter was diagnosed with Parvo on Monday) or Coronavirus (also a dog from there last week diagnosed with it). From what I read online both are contagious after they are cured for several months to other dogs. My vet does not think it is wise if it is either to bring him into my home with my older dog as he is so much more likely to contract anything so much more easily, regardless of his vaccinations, due to his weakened immune system.

Vet is going to get back to me later today and let me know, there is also a chance it could be an intestinal disease that is common among GSD which I cannot remember the long name of.
 

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It could also be simple hemorrhagic gastroenteritis from stress and/or parasites. Been there, done this with an adult rescued GSD from a shelter. Metronidazole (Flagyl) is a quick and fairly cheap remedy.
 

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There's really nothing you can do at this point...the dog is 700 miles away and the shelter would be extremely negligent to let him travel in this condition just so you can pay for the vet bills.

Parvo stays in their system for about a month, and only comes out on the feces. Make sure you pick up the feces, and make a bleach/water solution of about 30 parts water 1 part bleach and spray a little on the ground he's gone on. Your older dog shouldn't get parvo, doesn't matter what the vaccination history is, he should've been vaccinated for it on a yearly basis according to most suggestions. Older dogs also build up an immunity to it naturally by living and walking in the world.

I don't believe the feline and canine virus is the same, so the cats shouldn't be affected. If the dog pulls through this week...he'll be fine and shouldn't have any symptoms in the house. If he's drinking and keeping it down, it means its either not parvo or a very light case of parvo so I have my hopes up. My boy had it at 8 weeks and couldn't keep ANYTHING down for 5 days...had to get fluids through IV.
 

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Parvo is shed in feces for 2-3 weeks after the dog recovers clinically. Definitely not several months. 4 weeks is considered sufficient time for quaratine after parvo. Dogs that were vaccinated and have immunity should be fine, puppies that have not built up immunity and are not fully vaccinated could potentially be at risk during the shedding phase.
 

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Parvo is shed in feces for 2-3 weeks after the dog recovers clinically. Definitely not several months. 4 weeks is considered sufficient time for quaratine after parvo. Dogs that were vaccinated and have immunity should be fine, puppies that have not built up immunity and are not fully vaccinated could potentially be at risk during the shedding phase.
Its shed in feces but can remain active for several months if areas where the dog has gone poop is not cleaned properly. Most vets will tell you to wait a year to get another puppy if you just had a puppy with Parvo. That disease can live in snow, water, hot, or cold. Older dogs(because the immunity is weaker) are at risk whether they are vaccinated or not and should not be around a dog that has had parvo. There is no way in the world that I would bring home a dog that had parvo if I have a 19 year old dog. Any vet or person who works/worked at a vet will tell you this....In case your wondering I did work for a vet for many years and I also worked at the vet during the worse parvo outbreak they ever had.
 

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Yes, it can remain in the soil and it can be in the ground in dog parks and in the streets from unknown dogs. So any dog can contract parvo equally well in a dog park or in the street or. At the vet that recently dealt with parvo outbreak (inside the building or outside).
I have seen plenty of rescues treated and placed into homes with other dogs after a month without problems to the resident dogs. Unfortunately through rescue I have plenty of experience with parvo too. My dogs are vaccinated and never contracted any diseases from my fosters. So I have personal experience too.
 

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My co-worker rescued two 4 week old puppys and they got parvo. She took them to the vet every other day for IV fluids and anti-nausea meds. They both survived and were feeling better within a few days. She has 4 other dogs in the house and 2 cats. All vaccinated and all are fine. The pups were kept in a separate room and they clean with bleach daily and change clothing after playing with them.

The cost was not bad at all, she actually took them to the clinic at a local shelter and it was discounted. not even close to a thousand or anything like that. I hope this helps and makes you feel better. Parvo used to be this scary deadly disease and it still is, but diagnostics and technology is so much better now.
 

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Yes, it can remain in the soil and it can be in the ground in dog parks and in the streets from unknown dogs. So any dog can contract parvo equally well in a dog park or in the street or. At the vet that recently dealt with parvo outbreak (inside the building or outside).
I have seen plenty of rescues treated and placed into homes with other dogs after a month without problems to the resident dogs. Unfortunately through rescue I have plenty of experience with parvo too. My dogs are vaccinated and never contracted any diseases from my fosters. So I have personal experience too.
Just because you have not seen problems, doesn't mean that it should be recommended to anyone to bring a dog home with this disease, especially with a 19 year old dog. Parvo hits younger pups and older dogs for a reason. There are lots of dogs out there with weaker immune systems because of age.I also had dogs with parvo in my home and everyone was fine, but who wants that extra stress on top of bringing a new dog home? If the OP can keep the dogs completely separated for a few months, clean with bleach, etc..then everything can be okay.
 

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Plenty of people do, and I have never heard of resident dogs contracting the disease. Taking an old dog to a vet's office is equally or more dangerous, using this logic, because of the high concentration of sick animals and germs in the soil.

Do you suggest killing all dogs with parvo - which is what is left if nobody should take them home?
 

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What you will probably need to do in order to transport this dog to you is boarding for a month or so after whatever clears. You need a health certificate for a dog to travel - rabies, physical exam, cleared by a vet. If you are using a paid transport or transporters, they need to know as other dogs will be in those vehicles. Rescues do it, but have protocols and procedures from years of getting parvo dogs, and it still throws rescues for a loop. But yes, parvo pups and dogs live with foster dogs in homes all the time - however, I know when my seniors get too old or fragile in terms of their health - I can't bring in just any dog. I would need to foster a dog that has been temp fostered prior - so that boarding time will be important to your elderly dog - and you should know/check if your other dog is up to date on vaccines. I would also be discussing this with my vet, in reference not only to the adopted dog, but my dogs as well.
 
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