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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Everyone.

Our 9 week old pup has become quite the shark. I have read the sticky on puppy biting and have tried the "ouch" method which seems to work about 1/4 of the time. When this fails I would like to try leaving the room, but have a question about how to prevent her from tearing up the room shes in when I get up to leave. I don't want to put her in her crate before exiting the room as she may associate the crate as punishment and I no longer use the playpen as she learned to climb out after about 1 day! Any help or suggestions is very much appreciated.

Thank you in advance.
 

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Had the same problem with ours as a puppy, the ouch method really didn't work for us, and she continued to nip for awhile. Recently I saw a trainer use a very clever method for stopping unwanted behavior. A dog they were working with could not even stand the sight of another dog without barking his head off. They took a small spray bottle, filled it with water and 1 capful of vinegar and gave it a little shake. They came up with a command specific to ignoring other dogs completely. Command given, dog continued to bark, spray on the nose, barking stopped. Waited 5 minutes came back out, dog started barking, command given, spray, barking stopped. Waited another five minutes brought the dog out, no barking, in fact the dog completely ignored its presence, lots of slow calm praise given to the dog. Saw the dog a few weeks later at a training class, it was sitting right next to other dogs and completely ignoring their existence. If they left him alone, he acted as though they did not exist. Here, if you are comfortable with that method, if the dog starts biting come up with a command specific to that behavior give it, spray. It should take relatively quickly. When reintroducing our GSD to a small chi-pom it grew up with, she would not leave the little one alone, causing a few tiffs. I did the same thing, 2 days later the dogs completely ignore each other. If the little one comes up thats fine, but GSD knows to leave it alone now. She really finds the spray offensive.

If you don't have any other dogs at the moment, get a punch of puppy appropriate chew toys. Leerburg has a nice little kit they use for building bite drive in puppies. They are all real soft, start letting her take out that chew desire on something like that. Let him/her know those are good to chew on, play a little tug with her, have some fun. If she tears up the room when you walk out, its fine to put her up in a crate or playpen. Its better he/she never gets a chance to chew on things you don't want her to, than trying to correct her for it at this age. Chewing is pent up energy, plain and simple. Start wearing this little one out with training, or setup a play pen with tons of acceptable chew toys to let her wear herself out if you need to do some things around the house.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
thanks jmoney for the advice. No other dogs in the house so we can definitely get her some more appropriate chew toys. Many of the ones we have (I think) are for older dogs. We'll look into the Leerburgs. I guess now that shes eating regularly, her energy levels are way up, so we need to step up the training and wear her out with some tug and fetch.

Thanks again.
 

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Just use the crate, this is what they are for. Give her a high value treat so she associates it with it being a good place to go. Don't act sorry you're putting her in there, just put her in with her treat and leave.

The biting does get better! They seem to outgrow it fairly quickly actually. Just try to redirect her onto something more appropriate like a toy or a bone.

Some gentle exercise is good, you can also work on things like tracking or scent detection which they can certainly start learning at this age. It is good because it's low impact, so easy on growing bodies, but good for tiring them out mentally.

Good luck, would love to see some pics!
 

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Definetely lots of play and fun time, good for bonding and toys really do help with teaching what's appropriate to bite and what's not. Quick 5 minute obedience sessions will also help tire her out mentally, a tired pup is a well behaved pup ;)
 

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She is a baby baby. So this will take time and patience with management.

I know I uses baby gates and closed doors to keep my puppy in the room with me when I'm home so I can teach and work on the housebreaking and house manners. If I can't be in the room to see and help with that, then my pups have to be in crates or they will NOT progress with housebreaking and they may destroy something.

I tire my pups out with more socialization, play time, out and about to visit friends and family more than any real 'obedience' training. At 9 weeks everything needs to be fun and fast or it won't work.

CLICKER TRAINING is ideal for puppies. Did you get to see this yet?

http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum/welcome-gsd-faqs-first-time-owner/191183-top-training-expectations-puppies.html

:)
 

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I don't want to put her in her crate before exiting the room as she may associate the crate as punishment and I no longer use the playpen as she learned to climb out after about 1 day!
I've been using a crate for timeouts with my current 2 and previous two dogs - a span covering nearly 13 year! I've NEVER had an issue with the dog associating their crate with punishment. A timeout should be calm and matter of fact, not a big deal. When your puppy is overstimulated you're probably getting frustrated and stressed too. A brief timeout in the crate is like a little break for both of you.

If you want to get up and leave a room instead, make your timeouts very brief. Cassidy couldn't be left alone for more than a minute or two (literally!) before she'd start shredding something, so her timeouts were maybe 30 seconds or so, unless I put her in the crate. A couple of short well timed exits, closing the door behind me and leaving her alone, worked much better than walking away for 15 or 20 minutes at a time.

Of course this is only effective if your puppy wants to be with you so much that removal of your attention and presence actually matters. A more independent puppy might not care, and be perfect happy to entertain herself. Cassidy actually liked her crate so much that we were never able to eliminate it, even though I wanted to. We ended up taking off the door, and she slept in their every night, as well as took naps at other times.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thank you all for the wonderful advice and links. When Sasha starts to get really nippy (not her typical puppy play), it turns out that she's a little cranky and needs a nappy. We discovered this after following your tips of giving her a time out in her crate and she would respond by zonking out almost immediately! Her regular "puppy nipping" seems to be reduced by some gentle coaxing/redirecting her onto her chew toys. TY on both fronts!

We've started clicker training and have seen some amazing results and are looking forward to kinderpuppy socialization later this week.

I've included some pics of her (hope it's ok to do so here). She's 10 weeks today.



And one of her hamming it up for the camera
 
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