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Are you saying that the gene pool you or anyone similar, can never be DM clear on both parents? Not trying to challenge you, just curious.
sorry, I don't quite understand what you're asking.... I will breed my female (who is clear) to a clear if that is the right stud dog to use. But I will not dismiss a dog because they are a carrier - because she is clear. IF she was a carrier, I would not breed her to another carrier because then I could produce affected.

Breeding risks for degenerative myelopathy can be calculated using the Punnett Square:
  • If both parents are clear (N/N) then all of the puppies will be clear.
  • If one parent is a carrier (N/A) and one is clear (N/N) each puppy has a 50% chance of being clear and a 50% chance of being a carrier.
  • If both parents are carriers (N/A) each puppy has a 25% chance of being clear (N/N), 50% chance of being a carrier (N/A), and 25% chance of being affected and carrier (A/A)
  • If one parent is clear (N/N) and one parent is affected (A/A) then all puppies will be carriers (N/A)
  • If one parent is a carrier (N/A) and one is at risk (A/A) each puppy has a 50% chance of being a carrier(N/A) and 50% chance of being affected and carrier (A/A)
  • If both parents are at risk (A/A) then all puppies will be affected and carrier (A/A)
 

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Meh... mine ended up having terrible hips.
First of all, this is not a piece of furniture, so returning him for a replacement? I don’t think so.
Second of all, if a pup has bad hips, would you want to get another from the same breeder? In my case, no. So to me, the guarantee was worthless.
^^^^^^ Pretty much my thoughts exactly. Plus, where do these returned dogs go? Hope the OP took your message to heart.
 

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sorry, I don't quite understand what you're asking.... I will breed my female (who is clear) to a clear if that is the right stud dog to use. But I will not dismiss a dog because they are a carrier - because she is clear. IF she was a carrier, I would not breed her to another carrier because then I could produce affected.

Breeding risks for degenerative myelopathy can be calculated using the Punnett Square:
  • If both parents are clear (N/N) then all of the puppies will be clear.
  • If one parent is a carrier (N/A) and one is clear (N/N) each puppy has a 50% chance of being clear and a 50% chance of being a carrier.
  • If both parents are carriers (N/A) each puppy has a 25% chance of being clear (N/N), 50% chance of being a carrier (N/A), and 25% chance of being affected and carrier (A/A)
  • If one parent is clear (N/N) and one parent is affected (A/A) then all puppies will be carriers (N/A)
  • If one parent is a carrier (N/A) and one is at risk (A/A) each puppy has a 50% chance of being a carrier(N/A) and 50% chance of being affected and carrier (A/A)
  • If both parents are at risk (A/A) then all puppies will be affected and carrier (A/A)
Correct my boy is at risk but he will be bred only to a clear and the correct female. He is a fog that should be bred given the way the GSD is today. No reason to throw out excellent genes because he is at risk. His pups will only be carriers and no issue with that.
 

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I offer it. But I do not demand the puppy be returned, because yes, people are attached by that point, and they do not want to give up the dog, so the warranties that want the dog back, they aren't worth the paper they are written on. People do it because in the US it is expected. Not sure about Canada. I don't think it is typical in Europe. To get a replacement puppy, the hips have to be diagnosed by x-ray and the x-rays evaluated by the OFA. And then, if the dog is not returned, the dog must be spayed or neutered. I don't want folks out there breeding a dysplastic dog, while getting a replacement puppy.

And there is a the point about not getting another puppy from a breeder that produced a problem. The thing is EVERY breeder produces problems of one sort or another. Dogs die of something. It is a fact of living in a fallen world. There is disease and death, and so, you got he luck of the draw and were landed with a pup that had bad hips. If there is any way to know, how were the other puppies in the litter, and from the same breeding? If this was 1 pup out of 15 or out of 28 pups that the bitch produced in four litters, maybe you take your chances. Because you could be your next breeders first pup with dysplasia. On the hand if the dysplasia was severe and caused serious symptoms, then I'd probably pass too.

I always cringe a little when folks say that you go to a good breeder to avoid health problems or you are going to have a ton of health issues from a puppy that the breeder was inexperienced, etc. We do not go to good breeders to ensure us of a pup who goes through life without any issues. We pay the extra money to support the breeders who have a breeding program that we like, that we want to support. The better breeders are putting dogs together to produce the best health, temperament, longevity, structure, drives, trainability, and so forth. That doesn't mean they will all live to be 14 and relatively healthy. It means that the breeder is working hard to produce healthy, examples of the breed. And, we pay the extra money because the breeder loves her dogs and cares for them properly, he or she knows his dogs and his lines intimately, by training and hopefully trialing them. Good breeders should be there if you need help, not to pay the vet bill but to steer you in the right direction when it comes to veterinary care, training, behavior, and so forth.
 
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