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We recently rescued a 4 month old German Shepherd puppy. He was found at the dump. We have only had him about 2 weeks. Bomber can sit. He is crate trained. He will go to the bathroom outside. However, he will not listen to anything my husband or I tell him. If we tell him "no" he does not listen. He keeps doing whatever he was doing. When he does listen we tell him "good boy" and give him a treat. He likes to bite as well as pull when walking on a leash. We are trying to get him to not do this. As of right now we are keeping him in the garage while we get a fence around the house so he can run around in the yard. My neighbors have small dogs and we don't want Bomber to hurt them. We try to get him out everyday and play with him and exercise him until we get the fence put in. Does anyone have any suggestions about how to get him to listen?

BTW: We did sign him up for Obedience Classes at our local Petsmart but those do not start until December 13th!
 

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Welcome to the board and thanks for rescuing this dog.

It's not clear from your post whether he lives in the garage or in your house? It's especially important to keep a new puppy nearby all of the time. Gsds are especially pack oriented and do best when living inside with their pack. Having them with you helps build a strong bond and makes training much easier.

Also, chances are that he has no idea what "No" and lots of other things you're telling him mean so it's probably not a matter of listening as much as understanding. I've had much better luck with redirecting puppies to something I do want them to do and then praising them. When I have a puppy or foster puppy I carry treats and a toy with me at all times and set the pup up for success so that s/he understands what it is I want and get rewarded for any little thing they do the way I'd like them to do it.

And...where are the pictures of your new pup????????????
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Thanks for the input.

We are keeping Bomber in the garage, not the house. My husband and I do not want him in the house. He will be a dog that stays outside or in the garage.

About the picture....I cannot figure out how to add one to my profile.
 

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He's not listening because he doesn't know what any of the commands you're giving him are yet. Can you find other classes sooner? Or go to the puppy section on here, there is great information about starting clicker training. Imagine someone talking to you in a foreign language. That's what it's like for him right now.

He's only a baby, the biting phase will pass. He's just trying to play, but redirect him to a toy. Keep them around you at all times and don't make the biting about the reaction he gets from you.

Get a long leash so he can play in the yard too, and exercise him! When mine was starting out on a leash, I stopped as soon as he started pulling. Yes, it took forever sometimes to go 10 ft, but he walks excellently now.

Start training him in other things, like "leave it" but keep the sessions short, 3-8 mins max, several times a day. Give him lots of stuffed kongs to chew to give you a break.

Again, there are lots of good links in the puppy section, and tab289's youtube channel has excellent videos. CHeck it out, and welcome!! :)
 

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Also, yes--you have to puppy proof the house. Just like when people have babies--there is some modification that has to be done.

If you watch him when you can, and crate him the rest of the time (say you're gone) he can learn to live in the house fine. And he'll behave better, I promise. :)
 

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Very sad to hear your pup won't be living inside with you. It sounds as though he may have been better off at the dump.
 

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he isnt listening because he most likely doesnt know what you're asking of him. Obedience training will help but if he isnt able to develope a bond with you and be a part of the family, thats going to be difficult to do.

These dogs were bred to work closely with their people. Its one of the things that made them such efficient herding dogs. A dog who is left outside will make their own entertainment and could become a problem barker out of boredom and/or anxiety. Then you have to think about the potential the dog will escape the yard to find their own entertainment or develope aggression and bite someone which is a lawsuit waiting to happen.
 

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I agree with what others are saying, he doesn't know the commands yet. You can't just shout "no" at a puppy repeatedly and expect results. What worked really well with Luna when she was younger (she's still fairly young) and other dogs I've had in the past is redirecting. If he's chewing on the leash (or you!) when walking, then have a treat or toy handy so you can get him chewing on appropriate things. Luna used to have a fetish for shoes and socks. She chewed up about five separate shoes before she learned to chew only on her toys. Also, since he's still fairly young, I'd recommend keeping the training sessions short. I always exercised my pup till she was tired, then did some training with her. She always focused much better when she was tired and not as easily distracted. Maybe try working on the "focus" command so you're not just shouting at him randomly when he does something wrong.

Just curious, but why do you want to keep him outside/in the garage? Petsmart might also not be your best bet for training; good for socialization, but most of the trainers aren't great (there are a few that are good though, hope you have luck in that department!) Clicker training has also worked wonders for my girl; you should definitely look into it.
 

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Thanks for the input.

We are keeping Bomber in the garage, not the house. My husband and I do not want him in the house. He will be a dog that stays outside or in the garage.
I agree with the others... keeping Bomber in the house with you will be better for both you and the dog. He will be part of the family and work so much harder to please you. The dog hair and occasional chewed item are just a bonus!!! ;)
 

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One consideration for keeping this dog outside in a fence is that GSDs are intelligent dogs who want to do something most times. He will probably not lie calmly in the backyard waiting for you to come home and spend a few minutes with him.

He will probably bark, dig up your yard, etc. What is the point of having a dog if he is just going to be kept outside? I know there are reasons to keep a working dog outside but usually those dogs get a whole lot of one on one time with their people.

I have a 4.5 month old pup and he is most decidely a handful ......... and is getting ready to go into the stage where he challenges the limits. It takes a lot of work to properly raise a puppy. Glad you are taking classes.
 

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I couldn't help but think about this thread while getting ready for work...

My fear is that following this path is setting Bomber up for failure and he will end up back in the shelter before long. He will get destructive and aggressive, possibly with you and your family.

Obviously, you care about this dog, and have made the commitment to adopt him. If handled correctly, this dog would be an amazing friend that would willingly lay down his life for you and be good in the home and with children.

On top of that, tell your husband, he can blame his farting on the dog (how cool is that?) :eek:
 

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You may not like my answer......

I think you should find your dog another home. Keeping a dog in the garage, away from socialization, is not my idea of a happy pet.
He's only 4 months old, and at an age, where there's a better chance that someone would take him off your hands.

Your decision to isolate him from your home, is an early indication that you may not accept this dog into a loving, long term relationship.

I'll put it cut and dry.....

You either commit 100% to allow this dog into your life as a pet, and give it the love and family socialization it requires, or take care of it, while you search for another home for him.

And to answer the original question.... How can you expect him to know what "No" means? Who taught him?


Sorry.
 

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Very sad to hear your pup won't be living inside with you. It sounds as though he may have been better off at the dump.
That is harsh.

I do hope you, the OP, reconsider having him in the house with you. Give him a week in the house just as a test run and I bet you will see a HUGE change in how much he listens to you & your husband! Give him lots of toys, attention & praise and he'll become your best friend! Out in the garage & in the yard - he's his own best friend and thats pretty lonely.
 

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We recently rescued a 4 month old German Shepherd puppy. He was found at the dump. We have only had him about 2 weeks. Bomber can sit. He is crate trained. He will go to the bathroom outside. However, he will not listen to anything my husband or I tell him. If we tell him "no" he does not listen. He keeps doing whatever he was doing. When he does listen we tell him "good boy" and give him a treat. He likes to bite as well as pull when walking on a leash. We are trying to get him to not do this. As of right now we are keeping him in the garage while we get a fence around the house so he can run around in the yard. My neighbors have small dogs and we don't want Bomber to hurt them. We try to get him out everyday and play with him and exercise him until we get the fence put in. Does anyone have any suggestions about how to get him to listen?

BTW: We did sign him up for Obedience Classes at our local Petsmart but those do not start until December 13th!
First your pup was bred to live closely with you. Forget the garage. Leash Bomber to you while he learns the routine of the house. It will help the bond form between the 2 of you. It will make it easier to keep an eye on him and be ready to redirect when he gets into something..... as puppies will do. It will help Bomber learn what is expected of him. As your bond forms you will find he 'listens' more. When he is off leash in the house with you, use baby gates to keep him corralled in the same room with you. I've seen the typical baby gate at wallyworld for $10. Since he probably doesn't have a solid recall, use a 20/30 ft training lead outside. It'll keep his curiosity from getting him in trouble and the neighbors little dogs safe from his rough play.

As far as biting, that is being a puppy. They aren't called landsharks for nothing ;). I did the 'ouch' and offering a toy instead.

Once the fence is built, he will love getting out and being free to run in the yard. He will still need one on one play with you, plus the training, plus the walks on leash. And he will definitely still need to live in house with you. Otherwise, you are only asking for trouble when his brain kicks in to make his own entertainment.

If you just aren't able to see yourself becoming the family this pup needs to thrive, I agree with what another poster said.... it would be better to rehome him while he is still this young and easier to place.
 

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It's sad that you won't allow the pup to live with you in the house. Unfortunately unless you are going to spend most of your time in the garage, he won't learn how to be a "good boy". He will get bored being alone which most likely will cause him to become distructive, when he does see you or other family members he will become so over excited he will be labeled "out of control" and of course at that point you wont be able to let him in the house because he never learned any manors.
Please reconcider getting a crate and allow him to become part of your family, he will be a much better dog for it.
 

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It's sad that you won't allow the pup to live with you in the house. Unfortunately unless you are going to spend most of your time in the garage, he won't learn how to be a "good boy". He will get bored being alone which most likely will cause him to become distructive, when he does see you or other family members he will become so over excited he will be labeled "out of control" and of course at that point you wont be able to let him in the house because he never learned any manors.
Please reconcider getting a crate and allow him to become part of your family, he will be a much better dog for it.

Ditto the sentiment. German Shepherd's do best when treated like one of the family. Living in the garage is terrible. Why rescue a dog if you are going to keep treat that family member as an outcast? :confused:
 

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Discussion Starter #18
First off...

To all the people saying we should give him back up for adoption...

Who's to say the people who left him at the dump didn't let him live inside with them? I REALLY do not appreciate the comment made about him being better off at the dump.

We will love our gsd just as much if not more than everyone jumping to conclusions and saying that our new puppy deserves better.

Just because our new puppy lives outside during the day and not in the house, doesn't mean we don't love him. If he stayed inside he would be alone anyways... We have to work for a living... My family has the really bad habit of eating...

We spend several hours a day after work playing, petting, and just being with Bomber. We take him to our other family and friends houses with us to socialize him with other people and their pets. In fact, he's going to Thanksgiving dinner at my in-laws house. He's going to love the turkey bones we give him!

I believe my original post was misconstrued by saying he stays in the garage...

He only stays in the garage at night to protect him from the elements.

He has been given a second chance to grow up in a loving family that will allow him to enjoy life. And yes, he will be happy playing and running around outside. I mean, he is a dog afterall...

To the few that have commented on our original question, thank you. We are truly thankful for the advice.

And yes, more pictures to come.
 

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Ok please don't take wrong but COOKED turkey bones are not at all a good idea. (Also not the skin either)

I am not judging your decision TO leave him outside but he needs a secure dog pen if you plan on doing that. I can almost guarantee you he will create mayhem in your back dog unless he is incredibly mellow.
 

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Omg do NOT give your dog turkey bones! :eek:

Turkey may be a holiday treat, but the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals warned that the Thanksgiving meal can be dangerous for pets.

Pet owners should avoid giving their dogs or other pets turkey bones, which can splinter and become fatal if they are ingested, according to Ana Bustilloz of the SPCA's Los Angeles chapter.
She also offered a series of other holiday reminders for pet owners:
The combination of turkey skin and gravy have too much fat and long-term ingestion can cause pancreatitis in pets.

Don't give your pets chocolate, which can make animals sick.
Discard leftover bones and bits of turkey in a plastic bag tied securely and disposed in a dumpster with a secure lid so stray animals can't get to them.

http://www.nbclosangeles.com/news/local/Dont-Feed-Your-Dog-Turkey-Bones.html
 
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