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Discussion Starter #1
Have a 3 month old german shepherd male puppy & planning to get a female within 6 wks

We just got a male puppy at 9 weeks old, now he is about 12 weeks old and training is going ok. He is a bit of a handful but very sweet and calm temperament. Only problem we're having with him is that he pees in his crate at night and bites A LOT. I figure this is only because he is a puppy. However, my boyfriend and I are planning on getting a female for him to have a companion and she is currently 2 weeks old and ready to take home in about 6 weeks which would mean the male would be a little over 4 months old. My question is, is this a bad idea? We have always wanted a male and female but keep hearing different advice. 1) wait till he is older and better trained. and 2) get them both young because they will bond and not be as lonely when were not home.
 

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It's a terrible idea.

1) Training 2 is so much harder
2) The puppy does not need a companion other than you
3) The puppies will bond with each other as a pack instead of with you
4) dogs sleep when we aren't home. Whether there are other dogs there are not.
5) You are getting the 2nd one for all hte wrong reasons.
 

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Very bad idea. The dogs will bond with one another and not be bonded to you. That makes you less important and they are less willing to listen to you. The risk of having two unruly dogs increases. Unless you are willing to turn your lives upside down and devote huge amounts of time and money to training them separately and working with a very good trainer don't do it. Search this forum for more information. Train the dog you have to 3 years old and then get a second one. Anyone willing to sell you a dog when you have such a young puppy at home, is not a respected breeder. IMHO
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Well in the past we had 2 chihuahas raised together. Obviously this is completely different considering that they are completely different breeds but it actually went well. They had each other's company and still loved us at the same time. Is it a bad idea just because of the breed?
 

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Trust me, you have a lot more in store for you when your current puppy hits adolescence. Don't do it! Devote all of your time and energy into making your current puppy a great dog. Unless you're willing to spend double the amount on training classes, toys, good food, etc., then I wouldn't do it.
 

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Ok, I just did this about 8 months ago +1 as we have a GSD that was 18 months at the time.
Difficult? Yes, training is hard, frustrating. House training two? Not a picnic.
Do they focus on each other more than you? Sometimes, and this is why training is so difficult and you have to make them focus on you.
Will you have times that you wonder "what the **** was I thinking?" Yes all the time.
You and BF will need to work together to train and keep each other sane and enforce your house rules.
Bad Idea? I would not give up having worked these three together (still working them) for anything. Just be prepared for the time it takes and the dedication.
:)
 

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Bad idea for so many reasons .

Age differential really bad .
An undisciplined 4 month old and a 8 week old playmate is pretty much sacrificing the younger dog to being mauled , overwhelmed , used as a living prey toy .

You haven't even begun to train the one you have.

Fix the "he bites a lot" first. Get clean house habits first . Get reliable obedience first.

Your two chihuahas were probably pretty happy to have the run of the household -- your GSD is going to need to get out -- be physical . You can't compare . Not in any way.

Plans for breeding ?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I've heard about separating them and never leaving them alone together when we're not paying attention. Also, we have another 6 weeks to properly train the one we have.. would that be enough time for potty training and biting? And yes we were planning on breeding as well.
 

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ah ha - I knew it . (And yes we were planning on breeding as well)

even worse idea .

sorry -- you know next to nothing .
Not the basics , not the fine points of the breed.

What you have is two appropriate biological units.
 

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I would rather do a 4 month old with a 2 month old, than an 8 or 10 month old with a 2 month old.

Yes, it is a bad idea, if you aren't prepared for it.

Not every dog is going to maul and treat the younger pup as a prey animal. You may have to step in, if the older pup becomes a bully. Doesn't always happen. It would be much more difficult for a 4 month old pup to actually injure a 2 month old than it would be for a 6-18 month old puppy to do so.

Typically, people like to put 2-4 years between pups. Get that boy near perfect and then bring in a baby puppy, and the baby puppy can learn from the old hand. You will be much better at training by that point too.

So far, I have placed 2 puppies in the same home one time, and the one was with them for about 2 months before I relented and let them have the second puppy. The dogs are 18 months old now, and they reintroduced an older female that was with an X, and a young male boxer that was given them by their brother since getting the second puppy. But they are doing fine. The couple have just one kid, and he is only there are some weekends. He is about 6, and he can get all four dogs to sit and stay at the same time. Otherwise the family is very active and the dogs get plenty of exercise, are all neutered (not my idea), and the owner works as a groomer, so is proficient handling a variety of dogs.

It can work. It is not ideal. The possible benefits -- two dogs wearing each other out, are far outweighed by the probably negatives -- littermate-attachments, potty training two at once, double the training, double the exercise, double the vet bills, double the geriatric vet bills in a few years, and double the heart break when one follows closely on the other's heels.
 

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You might be able to potty train in six weeks but you will not even have begun training this dog. This is not a Chi... it is a dog that will have some body mass and a nice big mouth and when he jumps up on someone he can hurt them and you can be liable. If they develop bad behaviors, it is a much different experience than with Chis. As other said they are not comparable dogs. Are you ready to only do dog things every day and every weekend? You just seem to not get how much work this will take (and money and time) to do this right. I super duper encourage you to love on the current puppy and work to make him the best dog ever. As others said, you haven't entered the tuff times with an adolescent working breed.

What are your plans for training? Classes, a one on one trainer?
What are your plans for exercise? This are very smart dogs and if they don't get enough exercise or training they will cause trouble.
Ready for veterinary care? Who pays for it?
What do you think a typical day will look like? Who walks them in the morning? Who trains whom? Who is responsible for more aerobic exercise?

Good luck to you but it really sounds like you need to think about the reality of this rather than how cute puppies are.

Edit: Ack I did not see the breeding statement. I hope you stop acting impulsively and really get down to learning (really learning and investing in that learning) how to work with and treat dogs with integrity, expertise, and a thoughtfulness that is not reflected in this post.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Well we have been devoting all of our free time towards him and honestly I love it. I am in love with our puppy and I would see them both as having 2 kids you need to be there for. 24/7. We pay for the vet (money is not an issue) And we were planning on doing obedience classes once week when he is a tad older. My boyfriend and I take turns walking him and we have a few very nice parks to take them to when they are older to get the exercise they need.

Either way I really appreciate everyone's advice. It is something we definitely have to think long and hard about. But I think in the end it would be worth it.
 

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ah ha - I knew it . (And yes we were planning on breeding as well)

even worse idea .

sorry -- you know next to nothing .
Not the basics , not the fine points of the breed.

What you have is two appropriate biological units.

German shepherd Breeders, German shepherd Breeder

THE DECISION TO BREED OR NOT TO BREED

THE FACTS:
It is extremely important to learn the facts and possible consequences in advance if you are contemplating breeding your dog. In today’s overcrowded world, we-the wardens of our domestic pets – must make responsible decisions for them and for ourselves. Please review the following points carefully.
QUALITY: SV registration is Not an indication of quality. Most dogs, even purebred, should not be bred. Many dogs, though wonderful pets, have defects of structure, personality or health that should not be perpetuated. Breeding animals should be proven free of these defects BEFORE starting on a reproductive career. German Shepherd Breeding should only be done with the goal of IMPROVEMENT – an honest attempt to create puppies better than the sound, wonderful parents they come from. ignorance is NO excuse! Once you have created a life, you can’t take it back - even if it’s blind, crippled or a canine psychopath!
COST: German Shepherd Dog breeding is NOT a money making proposition, if done correctly. Health care and shots, diagnosis of problems and advance genetic testing to determine quality and breedability, extra food, proper facilities, stud fees, advertising, etc. are all costly and must be paid BEFORE you sell any pups. An unexpected Caesarean or emergency intensive care for a sick pup, or even a litter of sick pups as often happens with parvo, will make break – even litter become a BIG liability.
SALES:
First-time German Shepherd breeders have no reputation and no referrals to help them find buyers. Previous promises of “I want a dog just like yours” evaporate. Consider the time and expense of caring for pups that may not sell until 4 month, 8 months, or longer…what WOULD you do? Send them to the pound? Dump them in the country? Sell them cheap to a dog broker who may resell them to research labs or other unsavory buyers? Veteran German Shepherd breeders with a good reputation often don’t even think about breeding unless they have people waiting for the puppies, with cash deposits in advance for an average-sized litter.
JOY OF BIRTH: If you’re doing it for the children’s education, remember the whelpling may be at 3 AM, or at the vet’s on the surgery table. Even if the kids are present, they may get the chance to see the birth of a monster or a mummy, or watch the dog they love scream and bite you as you attempt to deliver a pup that is half out and too large some bitches are not natural mothers, and either ignore or savage their whelps. Bitches can have severe delivery problems, or even die in whelp. German Shepherd Pups can be born dead, or with gross deformities that require euthanasia. Of course there can be joy, but if you can’t deal with the possibility of tragedy, don’t breed.
TIME:
Veteran German Shepherd breeders of quality dogs state they spend well over two hours a day, every day, for months, to raise an average litter. The bitch CANNOT be left alone while whelping, and only for short periods for the first few day after. Be prepared for days off work and sleepless nights. Even after delivery, mom needs care and feeding, pups need daily checking, weighing, socialization, and later grooming and training, and the whelping box needs lots and lots of cleaning. More hours are spent with paperwork, pedigrees and interviewing buyers. If you have any abnormal conditions such as sick puppies or a bitch who can’t or won’t care for her babies, count on double the time. If you can’t provide the time, you will either have dead pups or poor ones that are bad tempered, antisocial, antisocial, dirty and/or sickly – hardly a buyer’s delight.
HUMANE RESPONSIBILLITIES:It’s midnight…do you know where your German Shepherd puppies are? There are more than FIVE MILLION unwanted dogs put to death in pounds in this country EACH year, with million more dying homeless and unwanted of starvation, disease, from automobiles, abuse, etc. A quarter or more of the victims of this unspeakably tragic situation are purebred dogs “with papers. “ The German Shepherd breeder who creates a life is responsible for the life. Will you carefully screen potential buyers? OR will you say “yes” and not think about that little German Shepherd puppy you held and loved now having a litter every time she comes in heat, which fills the pounds with MORE statistics – YOUR grandpups? Would you be prepared to take back a grown puppy if the owners could no longer care for it? Or can you live with the thought that the baby YOU caused to be brought into this world will be destroyed at the pound?
CONCLUSIONS: Because of these facts, German Shepherd dog breeding is best left to the PROFESSIONAL BREEDER!
 

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Please wait. I worry about the safety of a young puppy with an adolescent dog. My dogs are always 5 or more years apart because I want each dog to get all the training and attention needed. With a German Shepherd puppy, most don't settle down until 2-3 years. So at best, I would wait until the one you have now is 3. I just got a puppy last fall and my older dog has been helping me train him. I could not have done it without her.
 

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Boy, are you in for a wild ride...

We lost our 10year old sheltie over the holidays, and despite our (mostly MY) vow to NOT get another dog until we move, we came home with a 2-month old sheltie puppy two months ago...

and had a 7-month old shiloh already home. So, two puppies with a 5-month gap between them.

NIGHTMARE.

Seriously. I was already dealing with my older puppy staying firmly in his Fear Phase, and we added in a very typical in-everything younger puppy. With the thankful exception of potty training, ALL the rest of Tal's training went bye-bye. Kel is actually smarter, but it's hard to get him to focus on us, on leash training, grooming, etc, when he would rather be with his best bud.

The puppies get along famously, and they will wear themselves out, but in the beginning we had to keep them separate since Tal had no bite inhibition and Kel had no fear, so we were dealing with a big puppy trying to play/maul a much smaller one.

They are best buds, but we have to separate them for training, reinforcement of training, etc. They simply will be each other's distractions. It is exhausting. We have time, we have money, we have space, but the amount of time, money and space you will need for two very fast-growing, intelligent dogs will quickly cause those 'yeah, it'll be fun we walk them anyway!' phases to diminish.

Your older puppy will be much larger when the younger one comes (since I guess it's safe to assume you and BF are getting that puppy no matter how many people here say (or imply) it's a stupid idea), and guess what, at 4+/- months, he will NOT be completely trained. He'll be in the beginning stages of teething, and could easily use the younger one as a chew toy.

The novelty will wear out when you somehow maybe manage to train the older puppy, only to have to go through the same thing all over again with the younger.

And as for any breeding...this breed can take up to 2 years to physically mature; are you two already preparing for the extra time and space needed for 1) your boy's entrance into puberty, and 2) your female's heat cycles? And all the expected testing and training that you would want since you plan to be a reputable breeder...?

I love my pups. They are funny and sweet but together they are more work than I ever thought they would be (and they're not even the same breed, but both boys).
 
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