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Why kick the dog off the bed? Because it is misbehaving. On the bed is a big privilege. It needs to be earned. Dog acts bad, dog hits the floor. Dog on bed is dog taking charge in this case --- not just that she's warding off BF from bedroom, but that she's trying to control him in several situations. Dog gets demoted until she earns her rank.
 

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going out on a limb here:

I wonder if sometime in the past your bf raised his voice or acted somewhat aggressive in your presence, even if unintentional. Dogs don't forget. Sensitive dogs will protect their owner.
I rescued a little 10 lb. malti-poo that was just a gem UNTIL my adult son raised his voice or acted loud and semi-aggressive. Had nothing to do w/ the dog but little doggy took it as a threat to me. OMG, rockets go off, doggy
goes into full on protective mode. Warning son not to get near me w/ vicious looking faces and noise. Full protective mode.
I think your dog is doing the same. Warn bf about his voice and behavior and then work on re-training dog to 'accept'
him and not consider him a threat. Dogs do notice voices and behavior of those around.
 

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I would start pairing his re-entry into the bedroom with things like cheese, steak, spoonfed canned cat food or any other thing that she finds particularly delightful, or maybe a favorite game or toy. Lay it on thick, do it every time.
 
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I would start pairing his re-entry into the bedroom with things like cheese, steak, spoonfed canned cat food or any other thing that she finds particularly delightful, or maybe a favorite game or toy. Lay it on thick, do it every time.
I’m just guessing here like everyone else but something like that may have been what triggered the whole thing... presumably when you get a new guy you like to come meet your dog, the guy is extra nice and and the owner acts way differently... a lot is at stake when everybody wants to like everybody and the interaction was likely awkward and different from everything else and the dog didn’t understand AT ALL what was going on 😂... it was probably a whole series or badly timed extra special rewards and hugs and kisses and it had the exact opposite outcome as intended.
The dog probably picked up on the extra nervousness of OP, didn’t realize it was because she was nervous the dog would SCARE the guy, so she barked extra, got rewarded for barking extra,
NOW, the dog can sense everyone’s “nervousness” when they know he’s going to walk in and has no idea everyone’s nervousness is caused by her barking and not the BF walking in the door.
Purely for science, I wonder what would happen if everyone in the house put on headphones and blindfolds so they had no way of knowing when the BF walked in the door so they can’t have any kind of reaction and see if that changes anything.
I love dogs like this btw... they are so in tune with their people’s emotions that they don’t know what to do with themselves.
 

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Love me, love my dog. I generally have at least one dog in the bed with me, their choice as they have dog beds and crates. I hate closed doors, if I had it my way my home would have no interior doors so the dogs may come and go as they please. Any man in my life can get with the program or hit the bricks.
:unsure:LOL are you single again? :)
 

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Discussion Starter #28
This isn't just a bedroom issue as highlighted above for those who missed it.

I'm inclined to believe that it might be more of what @iBite suggested. An inadvertent learned response. Vada postures and she gets a soothing reassuring "hey it's me let me show you how much I love you" response. Boyfriend has been around 5 years and I'm reading this isn't a new behavior (OP correct me if I'm wrong). It does sound like a learned behavior. I'm no expert though.

Has your boyfriend ever just very firmly said something like "HEY it's me! Knock It Off!" to Vada or "Who do you think you're growling/barking at?" If so what was the dogs response? Does your boyfriend ever correct Vada for any other bad behavior? What is her response when/if he does?
If he isn't correcting her he needs to be as he is part of the household/family.
My family members believe Vada does this to only him bc she is jealous. She is jealous of any attention I give to even our Lab. They tell me all the time that when I am not home or around (on a walk etc.) She is not as aggressive. Maybe I should clarify too... there is a lot of feedback regarding my bed. She actually will happily lay with us, lick him, snuggle up to him and then go down to her bed on the floor. If we tell her to get in her bed, she immediately does. The bed is really incidental. Her worst growling and barking is when he enters the room, house, kitchen etc. But again, when I am not home, she's not so bad. So could she be "showing off" for me?
I really appreciate all the feedback, friends. German Shepherds are so smart. SHE knows why she does this. It's just for ME to figure out. Thanks everybody 👍
 

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Discussion Starter #29
going out on a limb here:

I wonder if sometime in the past your bf raised his voice or acted somewhat aggressive in your presence, even if unintentional. Dogs don't forget. Sensitive dogs will protect their owner.
I rescued a little 10 lb. malti-poo that was just a gem UNTIL my adult son raised his voice or acted loud and semi-aggressive. Had nothing to do w/ the dog but little doggy took it as a threat to me. OMG, rockets go off, doggy
goes into full on protective mode. Warning son not to get near me w/ vicious looking faces and noise. Full protective mode.
I think your dog is doing the same. Warn bf about his voice and behavior and then work on re-training dog to 'accept'
him and not consider him a threat. Dogs do notice voices and behavior of those around.
I think you're right. It does sound like that might be it. 🙂
 

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Discussion Starter #30
This isn't just a bedroom issue as highlighted above for those who missed it.

I'm inclined to believe that it might be more of what @iBite suggested. An inadvertent learned response. Vada postures and she gets a soothing reassuring "hey it's me let me show you how much I love you" response. Boyfriend has been around 5 years and I'm reading this isn't a new behavior (OP correct me if I'm wrong). It does sound like a learned behavior. I'm no expert though.

Has your boyfriend ever just very firmly said something like "HEY it's me! Knock It Off!" to Vada or "Who do you think you're growling/barking at?" If so what was the dogs response? Does your boyfriend ever correct Vada for any other bad behavior? What is her response when/if he does?
If he isn't correcting her he needs to be as he is part of the household/family.
Thank you , love what you say here. The last few days, when he walks in the house, I told him to try addressing HER first. I walk in after or stay silent and let him greet her. Seems a little better.
 

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My family members believe Vada does this to only him bc she is jealous. She is jealous of any attention I give to even our Lab. They tell me all the time that when I am not home or around (on a walk etc.) She is not as aggressive. Maybe I should clarify too... there is a lot of feedback regarding my bed. She actually will happily lay with us, lick him, snuggle up to him and then go down to her bed on the floor. If we tell her to get in her bed, she immediately does. The bed is really incidental. Her worst growling and barking is when he enters the room, house, kitchen etc. But again, when I am not home, she's not so bad. So could she be "showing off" for me?
I really appreciate all the feedback, friends. German Shepherds are so smart. SHE knows why she does this. It's just for ME to figure out. Thanks everybody 👍
You say in another post “she seems a little better.“. Here you say your family members think they know why she is growling and barking at him. I’m very worried for him and for your family and I will explain why. I mentioned before you have a mix of one breed that has some human aggression. However, German Shepherds can be trained and eventually get used to family members. Even though he is a boyfriend to you, in her mind he should be a family member due to the amount of time she spends with him. Instead she growls and barks at him. Barking is no big deal. My dogs bark at my family members for a second when they first walk in to say hello. But they are not growling. A growl is a warning to back off.

Your other breed in the mix is a fighting dog known for appeasement to humans. They are also known to be unpredictable as they get older. We spent an entire night in the ER last summer with a young man who was waiting for his dog the same mix as yours to get bites stitched up. The other dog who was a purebred of that breed was getting its ear removed because they couldn’t save it. The young man was covered with bandages on his arms and legs from puncture wounds. Since we were sitting there so long and he wanted to talk, I asked him what happened. He said about six months ago, his mixed dog, who had always been very sweet, suddenly turned on his mother’s dog and started killing it. Then the other dog jumped in. Because they were his pets and he wasn’t afraid of them, he tried to stop the fight and ended up in the ER covered with puncture wounds. After the first attack, his dogs occasionally growled but he Ignored it since they got along. That afternoon, his dogs suddenly got into a toy squabble and started fighting. This time he knew better and started shouting at them, and they stoped fighting and went after him again. He said his neighbor ran over and hit the mix in the head with a two by four to get it to stop. He was worried after a second trip to the same ER, they would euthanize his dogs. His words were, They have only done it twice, it probably won’t happen again.

Growling is a warning. If the problem isn’t fixed 100%, and I am not sure it can be without outside help, it could escalate. I had a purebred Mals GSD rescue that was a biter, but never against a family member. It was very random and I was never sure what would set him off, so I had to keep him isolated. He was Ace’d at the vet, which worked for him but is not used anymore, I suggest you either spend the money to get a behavior specialist to observe the dog or think about giving her up. It can be done during the day when your boyfriend walks into a room. The only other solution is to get rid of the dog. I know it sounds drastic and you won’t want to hear it. You will think about how sweet the dog is to everyone else and think you can fix it. I hope you can. In my experience, it only gets worse.
 

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No matter the reason or the dog's intention, she shouldn't do it. Period. (you can figure that out in the meantime) First, get her off the bed and furniture. Use a crate. Second, have your boy friend stop snuggling and sucking up to her. As soon as she shows any of the aggression he needs to ask her to sit and lie down. Curious how the dog would respond. Did he ever practice obedience and NILIF with her? I am surprised how relaxed you sound over this. My Whippet growled once on my teen's bed and he was never allowed on beds ever. I don't play with that stuff.
 

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Yes get the dog off the bed as has been said repeatedly and once before by me. Time for NILIF full bore until doggo shapes up. Just do it and quit rationalizing her behavior. Right now it needs to stop.
 

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Yes get the dog off the bed as has been said repeatedly and once before by me. Time for NILIF full bore until doggo shapes up. Just do it and quit rationalizing her behavior. Right now it needs to stop.
Yup.
It's amazing to me how many people rationalize a GSD older than few months still nipping/biting/jumping up/barking uncontrollably, lunging on a leash etc. Train your dog, he'll be huge soon enough.

I think people hugely underestimate the time required to produce those great dogs you see on TV or in the park. Of course, puppies can regress or problems pop up at a later age, but much easier to train at 3-4 months than correct at 12 ....
 
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