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Discussion Starter #1
So how does one learn the good and bad points of the different lines?

What about general characteristics?

On average with the ASL and German WL/SL? And famous dogs/lines within those group?

What about blends of these?

I eventually want to help improve my favorite breed. Right now I am chillin' and learning as much as I can with not only owning dogs and training them, but with the different lines as well.

This is obviously very far down the road for me.

But I was just REALLY impressed by another poster in another thread talking about individual dogs in a certain line, and their strengths/weaknesses.

Anybody have stuff to share on this? I would love to read it!!!! :gsdhead:
 

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But I was just REALLY impressed by another poster in another thread talking about individual dogs in a certain line, and their strengths/weaknesses.

Anybody have stuff to share on this? I would love to read it!!!! :gsdhead:
Me too! I especially love it when people who have been in GSDs a long time know some of the dogs personally.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the link...I love that website :)

All of the ASL dogs I have met I was NOT impressed.

I have met German SL dogs, and they seem pretty well-rounded as far as a family dog. I have seen one as a service dog as well.

I have loved all of the working line dogs I have met. Some of them seem a little crazy though.

Instead of asking about different types, what I really meant was lines within those types. Famous breeders, studs, females, etc.
 

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The best way to learn about the dogs from different bloodlines is to go to dog shows (AKC and FCI-style) and watch and talk and read the program and look up parents and then go to some competitions and read the program and look up parents and talk to people and meet their dogs and go to club training and seminars and some national level conformation and working conformations.

In other words, get involved, do your homework, look things up, write them down, take pictures, take notes, talk to people who have dogs you like, talk to people who have dogs you don't like. Train a few dogs, show a few dogs, trial a few dogs, take a dog to high level competition or help a friend to do so--or do both.

And then repeat it for years. :)
 

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What Christine said:)

When I first "got into" GSDs I thought all a good breeder needed was AKC and OFA. I have learned so much over the last 10 years from that point.

Most of my learning has been listening and reading. The last few years I have also been attending trials when possible, making notes, listening to Judges' critiques, and them coming back home and looking at the pedigrees.

Training my own dogs as hands-on practice. Being a member of clubs where I can watch others and learn things from them.

I can't wait for 10 more years to pass and the knowledge that I will learn over that time.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The best way to learn about the dogs from different bloodlines is to go to dog shows (AKC and FCI-style) and watch and talk and read the program and look up parents and then go to some competitions and read the program and look up parents and talk to people and meet their dogs and go to club training and seminars and some national level conformation and working conformations.

In other words, get involved, do your homework, look things up, write them down, take pictures, take notes, talk to people who have dogs you like, talk to people who have dogs you don't like. Train a few dogs, show a few dogs, trial a few dogs, take a dog to high level competition or help a friend to do so--or do both.

And then repeat it for years. :)
Challenge Accepted :crazy::D
 
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