German Shepherds Forum banner

201 - 220 of 253 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
My vet guesses that Baymax will get over 100 pounds easily. At 5 months old, he was 67 pounds, so I can only imagine what he weighs now. I'll be taking him for his year checkup in a couple of weeks, so he will get weighed and everything. My guess is he is probably about 90 pounds now, and he still has growing and filling out to do.

Wasn't my plan to get a dog so big, but oh well. Life happens like that sometimes, haha.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,598 Posts
I'm sorry, but a GSD is a medium sized dog. I have only seen one GSD that was truly a lean, working machine at 100lbs. A national level IPO dog. If you can not see your dogs last two ribs, you have an overweight dog. If you can not run your fingers down your dog's side and feel each and every rib distinctly, your dog is FAT!!!!!. Fat and overweight dogs, especially GSD's are a big pet peeve of mine. If you look down at your dog and do not see a waistline, then your dog is overweight.

I'll say this; a 100 + lb GSD is not desirable, not to be envied or encouraged. Except for the very rare, large dog that is agile, athletic and healthy. A dog that can run at 28+mph's and scale a 4' jump or fence with ease. A dog that can run 5 - 7 miles with little effort and barely breath heavy. If your dog can do that and weighs 100+ lbs, then ok. If not, start exercising him / her and put them on a diet.

I have owned GSD's since the 80's the largest was a female American SL dog that got to 90+ lbs and she was too heavy. A large dog that ended up being 80lbs.

Once I learned that weight is not an indication of quality in a GSD. And bigger is definitely not better with GSD's. Size is the last thing to look for and a big, meaning HUGE red flag when a breeder brags about how much their dogs weigh. Run, don't walk, away from a breeder that sells dogs based on size. When their major accomplishment is breeding oversized dogs and brag about 100+lb studs, you need to find a better breeder. Again, size is not an indication of quality with GSD's and is really only discussed by novices.

Here are some pics of Boomer, a very in shape GSD. He was 82lbs at his highest weight. I actually never weigh my dogs. I look at them every day and asses their weight and shape, I have no need to put them on a scale. Their weight is really not a factor and inconsequential to me. What is important to me is how well my dogs work, how fast they run, how long can they work for and how agile they are. Not how much they weigh. When I describe my dogs, I don't think their weight is even a topic of conversation.

I apologize if some members who have 100+lb dogs are offended by my opinions and experience. A GSD should be a working dog and you do your dog a huge disservice by allowing it to become obese. A GSD is a medium sized dog and males should be in the 75 - 85 lb range. Bigger is not better and nothing to brag about. >:)
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
Uh.....German shepherds are large dogs, and while 100+ is not the "AKC breed standard" there are several that are over 100 and not fat - it's all bone structure. Not saying there are fat GSD's out there, but to generalize and say that all GSDs over 100 are fat is completely wrong.

at 11 months, my boy is probs around 90 pounds, and still has growing to do, and he is not in any way fat. In fact, we have a hard time keeping weight on him! We keep increasing his food, but we can still see his ribs. He must have come from a large line (didn't get to meet the parents).
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,598 Posts
Please look at the breed standard, a GSD is not a large sized dog. The GSD was never designed to be a large dog. I do not go by the AKC standard as I believe that the AKC has little to no standards.

As I said and I stand by what I said, few GSD's are athletic, strong, agile and able to run for miles at 100+lbs. It is the rare Gsd that can still work and be healthy at over 100 lbs. Please monitor your dogs weight and do not let him get too oversized, It will negatively impact his hips, elbows and spine. If you can see his ribs that is great, no need to keep trying to put weight on him. He is only 11 months after all. I'm into true working line GSD's and not SL dogs these days. Sure, you can find plenty of American dogs or American SL dogs that are "large" or oversized, doesn't make it correct or beneficial.

Best of luck with your dog.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27,228 Posts
My boy Medic weighed in at 107.6 lbs and stood 28.75" at the withers when he turned 16 months. His father was 112 lbs and his mother was 93 lbs.
This dog is overweight, I can't see any muscle/tone in this structure.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,598 Posts
Onyx'girl,
That is a beautiful dog in the picture you referenced. But, I agree the dog needs to lose some serious weight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,828 Posts
My working line female is oversized for a female.. She is 26" and 88-90lbs (weighed St vet) 2.5yrs old.. She is a certified trailing SAR dog and working on HRD.. She can trail miles and miles and is wicked fast and agile... I can only imagine if she had another 10lbs on her how limiting it would become... She is very lean and well muscled... But additional weight to her would definitely inhibit her athleticism... I know she is a rarity in athleticism in an oversized frame, although not grossly oversized... At the last IPWDA workshop she was the envy of several officers.

This is not to disparage against the anomaly oversized GSD's... These dogs can be amazing dogs and should never be put down or belittled... Overweight GSD's is a sad sad thing to see... German Shepherds are bred to work and move with agility, too large, too heavy (especially due to obesity) and you are looking at potential trouble..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
222 Posts
I'm sorry, but a GSD is a medium sized dog. I have only seen one GSD that was truly a lean, working machine at 100lbs. A national level IPO dog. If you can not see your dogs last two ribs, you have an overweight dog. If you can not run your fingers down your dog's side and feel each and every rib distinctly, your dog is FAT!!!!!. Fat and overweight dogs, especially GSD's are a big pet peeve of mine. If you look down at your dog and do not see a waistline, then your dog is overweight.

Here are some pics of Boomer, a very in shape GSD. He was 82lbs at his highest weight. I actually never weigh my dogs. I look at them every day and asses their weight and shape, I have no need to put them on a scale. Their weight is really not a factor and inconsequential to me. What is important to me is how well my dogs work, how fast they run, how long can they work for and how agile they are. Not how much they weigh. When I describe my dogs, I don't think their weight is even a topic of conversation.
Love, love, love, the pics of Boomer :D and I specifically quoted Jim regarding the work, agility and how they run, and not focused on the weight. Weight doesn't matter :wink2:
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,598 Posts
Love, love, love, the pics of Boomer :D and I specifically quoted Jim regarding the work, agility and how they run, and not focused on the weight. Weight doesn't matter :wink2:
Thank you for the nice comments on Boomer's pics.

To be clear, I am not saying that every 100lb GSD is overweight. I'm sure there are some very nice, large GSD's with good working ability. I just believe they are the exception and not the norm. I love dogs and I really love GSD's and I hate to see a canine athlete that is allowed to become obese. I'm sure that there has never been a fat olympic sprinter or world class marathon runner. Too much weight on our dogs causes some severe health problems and the dog's are the victims. It is out of the dog's control to limit it's feeding and snacks. Too many people with good intentions wind up killing their dogs with their perceived kindness.

I was at a friends house last night that owns a female GSD. I haven't seen the dog in a couple of years and asked to see it. The dog was obese, fat as an Alabama tick. This beautiful 8 year old GSD that could barely move, waddled into the house. I told the owner as I glanced at the largest treat jar that I have ever seen, which was empty but the way, that the dog was obese. They replied "I know, we have her on a special kangaroo diet from the vet." (Vets know very little about dog nutrition or what a healthy in shape GSD should look like.) I said that diet must cost a fortune and I was told "yes, it does." Then the owners said "we have cut back her food, but she is still heavy?" I said "what about the treats, your treat bowl is empty!" The response was "she loves her treats. I'm definitely going to stop the treats with the next dog!" :surprise: "I said how about stopping the treats with this dog, she's not dead yet!" As I left my friend was petting his dog and said "she always looks so unhappy." He then pointed to the big bear skin rug of a dog laying on a dog bed and said " this is all she does." I couldn't leave fast enough, some people just don't get it and never will. At least they know their dog is obese, and are somewhat aware.

Regarding vets and a dog's weight, vets rarely see truly in shape dogs and will tell people with 95lb 9 month old GSD's that their dog is at a good weight. I suppose telling a client that their dog is fat is bad for business. :frown2: It is like calling some one's kid ugly. Vets also know little about nutrition and make a lot of money selling prescription diets. I am not trying to bash vets, if my dog is sick or injured that is where I go and rely on their expertise. For nutritional advice I go elsewhere. I feed raw and have never seen a fat raw fed dog. Boomer eats 2 1/2 lbs of meat a day and he is in excellent shape at almost 11 years old.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,902 Posts
Thank you for the nice comments on Boomer's pics.

To be clear, I am not saying that every 100lb GSD is overweight. I'm sure there are some very nice, large GSD's with good working ability. I just believe they are the exception and not the norm. I love dogs and I really love GSD's and I hate to see a canine athlete that is allowed to become obese. I'm sure that there has never been a fat olympic sprinter or world class marathon runner. Too much weight on our dogs causes some severe health problems and the dog's are the victims. It is out of the dog's control to limit it's feeding and snacks. Too many people with good intentions wind up killing their dogs with their perceived kindness.

I was at a friends house last night that owns a female GSD. I haven't seen the dog in a couple of years and asked to see it. The dog was obese, fat as an Alabama tick. This beautiful 8 year old GSD that could barely move, waddled into the house. I told the owner as I glanced at the largest treat jar that I have ever seen, which was empty but the way, that the dog was obese. They replied "I know, we have her on a special kangaroo diet from the vet." (Vets know very little about dog nutrition or what a healthy in shape GSD should look like.) I said that diet must cost a fortune and I was told "yes, it does." Then the owners said "we have cut back her food, but she is still heavy?" I said "what about the treats, your treat bowl is empty!" The response was "she loves her treats. I'm definitely going to stop the treats with the next dog!" :surprise: "I said how about stopping the treats with this dog, she's not dead yet!" As I left my friend was petting his dog and said "she always looks so unhappy." He then pointed to the big bear skin rug of a dog laying on a dog bed and said " this is all she does." I couldn't leave fast enough, some people just don't get it and never will. At least they know their dog is obese, and are somewhat aware.

Regarding vets and a dog's weight, vets rarely see truly in shape dogs and will tell people with 95lb 9 month old GSD's that their dog is at a good weight. I suppose telling a client that their dog is fat is bad for business. :frown2: It is like calling some one's kid ugly. Vets also know little about nutrition and make a lot of money selling prescription diets. I am not trying to bash vets, if my dog is sick or injured that is where I go and rely on their expertise. For nutritional advice I go elsewhere. I feed raw and have never seen a fat raw fed dog. Boomer eats 2 1/2 lbs of meat a day and he is in excellent shape at almost 11 years old.
Unfortunately, people struggle to take advice well enough to actually hear it.
Some people view their dogs as children. Its akin to saying your child is overweight, unruly, misbehaving, rude, and/or an actually not giving a good representation of the parents. I'm sure vets have become somewhat sensitive and mindful of the ramifications of criticizing a customers "furbabies".
Not only that, how many dogs do they see that are soft, so they become desensitized to chubby dogs?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
I absolutely believe it's wrong to let dogs get overweight. My previous dog, a Black Labarador, was in great shape and didn't start getting overweight until she was very old and developed arthririts and cancer, so couldn't move much. (Please make sure you read that correctly, she didn't get heavy until AFTER she couldn't move much, not the other way around)

We are very against scrap feeding, and my boy only gets his meals, and a few treats specifically for training (which are not the average junky treats - he has lots of allergies, so we have to buy him special food and treats) He gets a bone once a week, and he is quite slim and good looking. I've always read that you should be able to feel the ribs but not see them when it comes to eye-balling weight. We can see his ribs, so if that's the standard for a german shepherd, I guess he is in fantastic shape.

I wish I had a good standing pic of him. Most of my pics of him are when he is laying down or sleeping bc It's so cute, haha. And also, easy to get a pic of ;P

My profile pic is probably the best standing pic I have of him, but it doesn't show from the side. He's about 8 months in this photo

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,381 Posts
Twenty years ago when I first moved out here I had a ton of trouble with drunk poachers coming through in the middle of the night and cutting my fences. I belonged to a forum of dog people and one day I get a message to be at the airport the next day at three. The next morning I get a call that I have a puppy on the way who was 4 months old. I'm thrilled and so thankful for wonderful friends. That was my Stryker, my first WL GSD. He came from a working dog kennel in the East, but I don't remember which one anymore. People had bought him and then wanted some training done. Something happened and they couldn't take him.


My first hint was when I got there and they told me I would have to go into the back and get him myself. No one would go near him. He's a four month old puppy, whatever could the problem be? I walk back there and there's this huge crate. It's dead silent and all these men and women are standing around looking at it. First thing they say is I'm too small. Huh? The crate is up on a table about four foot tall. I walk around to the front and look in. There stands a beautiful black and tan shepherd puppy, head down, eyes almost slitted, looking very warily out. He was the size of a small pony. Literally, he was the size of most adult GSDs you see and he was only four months! I wish I still had the pictures but lost all in my house fire. They had the security guy come before they would let me take him out. Really? I guess they thought he was going to eat me or them. He was probably close to 70 pounds or more. And he wasn't fat, you could feel every rib. He was just huge. I almost landed on my *** taking him out of the crate and putting him on the floor because I didn't want him to jump down.


He grew up to average around 120 pounds. He was gorgeous and went everywhere with me that I could take him. I wish I had pictures, but lost them all in my house fire. Ironically, it was about two weeks after getting him that my son sent Shiloh, my Doberman, after the poachers. He stood framed in the doorway with Stryker on a lead. I think maturity had finally set in for Shiloh as she went after them. She'd never done that before. They never came back.


Every evening Stryker would go out and run the full perimeter of the property before coming in for the night. I wish I could go back in time to have him again. My vet recommended I keep him lean because of his size and worried about HD. His hips came out as good and he never had any problems.


Enya will be much smaller, a toy size shepherd I think. Her mother is small as well. But I'm fine with that. And the smaller ones are much easier to travel with. Stryker took up half my SUV.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
304 Posts
Agreed with Slamdunc. A good 90-95% of the 100-120lb+ "tall, big-boned" GSDs are overweight or obese. It seems very hard for people to recognize or acknowledge that their dog is actually overweight. And sadly no, many vets will NOT tell you that your dog needs to lose weight. Regardless of whether your dog is a companion pet or competes in sports, keeping them at a healthy weight is important.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,217 Posts
Shortly after coming on this forum I discovered my girls were in need of loosing some weight. I didn't know what "healthy" was supposed to look like and i didn't see the ramifications of them carrying those extra pounds. My previous dogs were relatively healthy and long lived, none were ever obese, but not as fit as they should be.

Since then I've changed things up and started monitoring their intake and ensuring proper exercise. It's paid off, they look great. Our older male is a WL coatie and his appearance is deceiving, he looks much bigger than he is. Get him wet and you wonder where all that dog went. One of our females is still over weight. We seemed to have hit a plateau with her. She acts healthy and is surprisingly able to move that big body around well. Recently a squirrel was taunting her from a lower branch, maybe 7-8' off the ground. I thought no way she'd reach it, but I was amazed she did, lucky for the squirrel she had a hold of the branch too and kept her from seriously injuring it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Some GSD's are just big. My Angus has just turned 3 in October and a recent trip to the vet for his checkup revealed that he was in perfect health. He is 112 lbs and 29 inches tall behind his shoulders. His abdomine is tucked up like it should be for a dog in good health. He runs all the time on the farm and is full of energy despite his owners lack of it! He wears me out!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,110 Posts
Some GSD's are just big. My Angus has just turned 3 in October and a recent trip to the vet for his checkup revealed that he was in perfect health. He is 112 lbs and 29 inches tall behind his shoulders. His abdomine is tucked up like it should be for a dog in good health. He runs all the time on the farm and is full of energy despite his owners lack of it! He wears me out!
At 29", his weight is proportional to his frame. I fostered a dog that was that height and skinny at 102#. 112# would have been perfect for him.
 
201 - 220 of 253 Posts
Top