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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Edit: My post might be coming off wrong...I was hoping for advice to maybe build his confidence or any advice pertaining to over-submissive behavior so he isn’t so fearful/standoffish for no reason at all. I know GSD’s can be aloof and he’s definitely portraying that personality. He’s well mannered and sweet natured but extremely accident prone...I guess I thought more so than he should be after 2 months of working on potty training ??‍♀ My apologies if everyone is misunderstanding me.

I have a 16 week old male GSD. We got him when he was 8 weeks old. He’s such a sweetheart!!! He’s so sweet I worry he’s too submissive.. potty training has been soooo slow with him that I’m unfortunately debating on finding him a new home. When we go to let him outside, while leashing he starts tinkling out of submission or fear?? I don’t know what he’s fearing though. I try to act like it’s a trick I’m teaching him to sit, then get leashed and that is seeming to help some but he still...he will just pee all the time when hes excited, while eating, while leashing, when telling him no when he’s mischievous. I feel like any “corrective voice” we use causes him to pee! It’s getting so frustrating...I just want to fast forward through the puppy stage? When he goes outside, he does his business right away, but the accidents everyday are still not lessening. He goes outside anywhere between 1- 3 hours, regularly. Doesn’t matter how long it’s been since he’s been out, he’ll still piddle when he’s eating or getting leashed. We are trying to train him calmly so he’s never really been “in trouble” for this behavior, although I do complain everytime it’s happening so he could be picking up my frustration. Any advice is greatly appreciated!!
 

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He's 16 weeks old. What exactly do you want from him? You complain everytime it's happening? Of course he is picking up on that and it's causing more issues. I think if you're ready to throw in the towel already then perhaps returning him to his breeder is the best thing for him.
 

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This happened with my Dad's old dog. he was perfectly behaved, a wonderful dog. But whenever my dad told him to do something he would urinate as he did what he was told. Any corrections: urine. It was really sad because he was such a well behaved dog, but unfortunately we had to re-home him. The difference is, our old dog was over a year old.

Yours is 16 weeks. He's in the puppy stage. He's learning and he's not completely sure of everything. Just hang in there for a couple of months. He'll catch on soon. Probably it is just a puppy thing that he will grow out of. I've heard of puppies peeing when they are little and told to do something and I think this is the case with your dog.

Good luck. Don't give up on him. I'm sure he'll be fine.
 

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My advice would be to realize (a) he's just a baby, and (b) his failure to learn to relieve himself outside ONLY is your failure not his! Tether him to you in the house, take him outside more frequently!

The involuntary urination is not uncommon, and usually resolves itself before a year. Your job in the meantime is to focus on building confidence and setting your puppy up for success!

When I first read your post, I was sort of leaning toward suggesting you return the puppy as well. But then realized it can be a bit overwhelming, raising a puppy, and often people are just airing their frustration at that particular time so it comes across as worse than the author intended...

Take a deep breath, enjoy your puppy for who he is, this stage will pass quickly! And when he matures into the handsome, confident animal he will be, you won't even remember the struggle of puppyhood!
 

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When mine was that age, I took him out every 15 minutes until he could hold it longer. 3 hours is too long for a dog that young to hold his urine unless he is asleep. At night, their pee production slows down.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
This happened with my Dad's old dog. he was perfectly behaved, a wonderful dog. But whenever my dad told him to do something he would urinate as he did what he was told. Any corrections: urine. It was really sad because he was such a well behaved dog, but unfortunately we had to re-home him. The difference is, our old dog was over a year old.

Yours is 16 weeks. He's in the puppy stage. He's learning and he's not completely sure of everything. Just hang in there for a couple of months. He'll catch on soon. Probably it is just a puppy thing that he will grow out of. I've heard of puppies peeing when they are little and told to do something and I think this is the case with your dog.

Good luck. Don't give up on him. I'm sure he'll be fine.
Thank you. I think my post is coming off wrong to the others, I appreciate your non-judgemental answer. He is a well behaved boy otherwise but it’s like we are constantly watching him like a hawk and the minute you take your eyes off her piddles or any form of corrections...piddle. It just seems as though after 2 months he should be lessening the accidents and getting better into the routine. Trying to stay positive.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
When mine was that age, I took him out every 15 minutes until he could hold it longer. 3 hours is too long for a dog that young to hold his urine unless he is asleep. At night, their pee production slows down.
I heard that how many months they are is how long they should be able to hold. So 8 weeks, 2 hrs...16 weeks, 4 hrs. He’s usually good when we are at work and the kids are at school. I go home at lunch and h let him out, rarely any accidents and it there is it’s usually poo. But when we are home he’s out on average every 2 hours at most! My 2 older kids and myself take turns letting him out often. We watch him like a hawk for behavior like he’s looking for someplace to relieve himself. But any form of correction, he piddles....and excitement my kids so towards him, he gets so excited and piddles. It’s a constant thing.
 

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Your issue isn't in holding it. Yours is submissive or excitement peeing. You need to change how you react to him and interact with him. If your kids going towards him makes it happen. Tell your kids to wait until he comes to them. This is on you to find the triggers and change how you interact with him.
 

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I heard that how many months they are is how long they should be able to hold. So 8 weeks, 2 hrs...16 weeks, 4 hrs. He’s usually good when we are at work and the kids are at school. I go home at lunch and h let him out, rarely any accidents and it there is it’s usually poo. But when we are home he’s out on average every 2 hours at most! My 2 older kids and myself take turns letting him out often. We watch him like a hawk for behavior like he’s looking for someplace to relieve himself. But any form of correction, he piddles....and excitement my kids so towards him, he gets so excited and piddles. It’s a constant thing.
Excited peeing and submissive peeing are involuntary and it doesn't have anything to do with housebreaking. You can't get upset at the puppy for something he has no control over.

I have a dog who was a mild excited piddler as a puppy. We managed it with only greeting when he was super empty, calm greetings with less touching or eye contact. It steadily declined as he grew up and was basically completely gone by 9 months or so. I never acknowledged to him that he had done it-- just made mental notes of what circumstances triggered it and made sure to modify something to get him to be successful and he grew out of it.
 

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When I board excited or submissive piddlers, we open kennel gate with zero acknowledgement or eye contact generally facing away from the dog and walk them straight out to toilet and after they are empty they get a calm greeting however they can tolerate.

Things that can trigger it:

-eye contact
-leaning over the dog
-reaching over head to pet
-high pitched voice
-stern voice
-sometimes any touching, or too much touching

So basically you start at zero acknowledgement/interaction with the dog ang very gradually feel your way to what they can tolerate without peeing. Say hi very calm, gentle voice, just "Hi so and so" and nothing else, can they tolerate that amount of talking? etc.

Usually the initial greeting is the worst part and after that things get much easier
 

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Your issue isn't in holding it. Yours is submissive or excitement peeing. You need to change how you react to him and interact with him. If your kids going towards him makes it happen. Tell your kids to wait until he comes to them. This is on you to find the triggers and change how you interact with him.
Let me try and expand on this, because I think its what Jax is pointing to here. You mentioned routine Ruger's Mom. Within the routine we sometimes create patterns, sometimes quicker then we realize. So think of breaking the pattern but not the routine. Pick him up and take him out to leash him. Things like that so that the peeing isnt an automatic response. Bring him back in for a minute, then take him right back out. The routine is where you take him, but the pattern is slightly different. For the most part submissive or excited peeing is more of an unintentional response to whatever. You want to get rid of the whatever and build on where he succeeded.
 

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QUOTE="Rugers_Mom, post: 9218995, member: 491400"]
Thank you. I think my post is coming off wrong to the others, I appreciate your non-judgemental answer. He is a well behaved boy otherwise but it’s like we are constantly watching him like a hawk and the minute you take your eyes off her piddles or any form of corrections...piddle. It just seems as though after 2 months he should be lessening the accidents and getting better into the routine. Trying to stay positive.
[/QUOTE]
Of course. I try my hardest not to judge in the least. I hate offending people. It's hard to stay positive. Good luck. I got so frustrated with Kias when he was little. I know what it feels like to have a puppy. I hope your problem is fixed.
 

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Let me try and expand on this, because I think its what Jax is pointing to here. You mentioned routine Ruger's Mom. Within the routine we sometimes create patterns, sometimes quicker then we realize. So think of breaking the pattern but not the routine. Pick him up and take him out to leash him. Things like that so that the peeing isnt an automatic response. Bring him back in for a minute, then take him right back out. The routine is where you take him, but the pattern is slightly different. For the most part submissive or excited peeing is more of an unintentional response to whatever. You want to get rid of the whatever and build on where he succeeded.
I've really missed you finishing my thoughts where my math brain ends. :) Where ya been my friend?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
When I board excited or submissive piddlers, we open kennel gate with zero acknowledgement or eye contact generally facing away from the dog and walk them straight out to toilet and after they are empty they get a calm greeting however they can tolerate.

Things that can trigger it:

-eye contact
-leaning over the dog
-reaching over head to pet
-high pitched voice
-stern voice
-sometimes any touching, or too much touching

So basically you start at zero acknowledgement/interaction with the dog ang very gradually feel your way to what they can tolerate without peeing. Say hi very calm, gentle voice, just "Hi so and so" and nothing else, can they tolerate that amount of talking? etc.

Usually the initial greeting is the worst part and after that things get much easier
Thank you!! This is really good information and I greatly appreciate your input!! I’m going to give this a try for sure !
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Let me try and expand on this, because I think its what Jax is pointing to here. You mentioned routine Ruger's Mom. Within the routine we sometimes create patterns, sometimes quicker then we realize. So think of breaking the pattern but not the routine. Pick him up and take him out to leash him. Things like that so that the peeing isnt an automatic response. Bring him back in for a minute, then take him right back out. The routine is where you take him, but the pattern is slightly different. For the most part submissive or excited peeing is more of an unintentional response to whatever. You want to get rid of the whatever and build on where he succeeded.
Thank you, this makes perfect sense...although he’s starting to get to big to carry around but this is very helpful!
 

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Discussion Starter #17
QUOTE="Rugers_Mom, post: 9218995, member: 491400"]
Thank you. I think my post is coming off wrong to the others, I appreciate your non-judgemental answer. He is a well behaved boy otherwise but it’s like we are constantly watching him like a hawk and the minute you take your eyes off her piddles or any form of corrections...piddle. It just seems as though after 2 months he should be lessening the accidents and getting better into the routine. Trying to stay positive.
Of course. I try my hardest not to judge in the least. I hate offending people. It's hard to stay positive. Good luck. I got so frustrated with Kias when he was little. I know what it feels like to have a puppy. I hope your problem is fixed.
[/QUOTE]
I hope the tips I’m getting from this post helps me help him to feel more confident and love instead of whatever it is he’s feeling that makes him have accidents. We are really trying to train him with positive energy because I know how GSD can be if trained improperly. But the frustration just kicks after cleaning up accidents so often.
 
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