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Hello all, I'm hoping to have my pup in a few weeks and my wife keeps coming up with questions. She read that GSDs are in the top 20 breeds that turn on their folks. I tried to assure her that any dog could do that. Is it true that you have to be more careful with them or is it just coincidental. Thanks ... :halogsd:
 

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That's just silly.The only way your dog would bite you was if he was in pain,in the midst of a fight,or felt threatened.Or I suppose some sort of serious mental disorder.Gsds are loving,loyal,Velcro dogs.I suggest you and your wife do a lot more research on Gsd temperaments and dogs in general.They aren't "jekle and hyde" creatures that turn on you!
 

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I've never seen it from my late dog Cubby.

She was sweet, loving and devoted up to her last breath.

I've never seen a more gentle dog than a GSD.
 

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Don't know what she's been reading, but German Shepherds are loyal, used as therapy dogs as well as tracking, guarding and excel in obedience. I raised my children with GSDs. In fact the one I had when my stairstep children were 6,5 and 3 became the neighborhood nursemaid, following all.

Your wife needs to feel confident with the puppy.

Your puppy will just be a baby and need cuddles etc.. Like two legged kids, they need time to mature.

Some will be nippy - just a stage, remember they don't have hands. They need exercise. A tired puppy is a good puppy.

Your children as well at the pup need to be respectful of each other.

Get good crate and read about crate training. Good way to give pup and children their own space.

Good luck
 

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I suppose that there is a reason based on statistics that everything you read has them on dangerous breed lists, most likely to bite, etc. at the same time they are listed as the #2 most popular breed.

This is basically what your wife is reading(it's pretty much the same everywhere)

"German Shepherd Dangerous Dog Breeds
If this is the most preferred breed by police and military units, there is a reason behind it. German Shepherd is an intelligent, aggressive, fearless and confident dog. If German Shepherds are not socialized properly, they can be more attacking towards people, even their owner. According to statistics, German Shepeherd is among five most dangerous dog breeds. Original bred for work, German Shepherds are aggressive dogs who are sometimes not suitable for being a family pet.

However, the dog is protective towards his family, there have been examples in the history where German Shepherd has attacked and killed people."

I don't personally see it with my own or with most of the ones I've met. I have seen a couple that just weren't right and quite scary but I don't know how or why they were that way. The biggest thing with them is training and socialization and it should be ongoing. They make great pets and are loyal dogs. Mine adore kids, but I can see where sometimes it wouldn't work.
 

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When I first got rosko an old painter I work with occasionally asked me if I was crazy. Said he knew a guy who got a gsd as a pup and when it grew to an adult it attacked him and he had to have 50 something stitches. After a couple questions I learned that the dog was tied up his whole life. The guys daughter would feed the dog. One day she came in and said that the dog had growled at her. The next day she came in and said the same thing. So he told her the following day that he would feed him. Will when he went in the dogs area to put the food in his bowl the dog attacked. That is all of the story that was available but yet those who heard it just associated gsd with turning on owner. Not owner setting dog up to fail.
 

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Thanks

Thanks all for the feedback. I'm really looking forward to getting this pup. No kids but 2 small yorkies and I know that a pup properly socialized with them will be fine. Have been considering crate training...will post pics when he comes.
 

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Actually, there's some research I've posted before by vet behaviorists who found certain training methods are more likely to elicit handler bites. All of the methods that had that connection in the study were aversive and caused the dogs to feel a need to defend themselves from their owners. It was not breed specific. So....the easy take-away from that is that idiots who hurt and scare dogs under the guise of "correction" may create dogs that bite.

Most of us who have created strong bonds with our dogs have trained them in ways that create a rock-solid foundation of trust. Focus on your bond, and forming that trust, and everything else will follow.
 

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I googled "top 20 breeds that turn on their owners" to view what your wife may have read. The site I clicked on actually listed the German Shepherd as #2. #1 was pit bull. I did this because it is important when going into a joint venture for your wifes concerns to be given consideration.

That being said, there are variables when looking at statistics and where the site actually got the statistic list from. A lot of what I offer is from learning from this gsd site and a little of my own experience. 1st and foremost, any breeder worth their salt breeds for solid nerve and clear headedness so make certain you read the "how to find a responsible breeder". It could save you a lot of heart ache.

Also the list I looked at validated the #2 position for amoung other things that the breed is used in K9 police units because of the ability to be aggressive. But that is only a half truth. Gsd's used for police work need to be clear headed with solid even temperment.

You are correct to ask these questions because you are considering a physically powerful and intelligent breed.

Also, the stats never indicated what percentage of the bites happened from abuse poor genetics, lack of socialization. Those stats would paint a much clearer picture if it did.
 

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In any group, you can always find a small percentage of dogs who are not playing with a full deck. Sometimes it's genetics, sometimes neglect and/or mistreatment, sometimes inconsistency and no boundaries or a great many other variables.

I can't speak for shepherds as a whole, as I have only had one, but I will tell you that mine is a sweetheart. Newlie was a rescue that we got when he was between 1-2 years old. He is currently between 5-6 and weighs 83 pounds, and I am older woman, so he seriously could have put me out of commission any time these last three years if he had decided to do so. Newlie has never deliberately laid a tooth on me. He scratched the back of my leg once when a ball bounced too close to me and when he first came to us, occasionally he would get so excited that he would try to grab a ball out of my hand, but he knows I don't like that and rarely does it anymore. I have stepped on his feet and his tail accidently before and he yelps and then gives me a kiss when I say "I'm sorry." He has had chronic, painful ear issues and he lets me clean them without fighting. He has seen different vets in his time with me and been given shots, had his toenails clipped (which he hates) rectal temperature and fecal samples taken and most recently had his right knee pulled and manipulated by a surgeon with a diagnosis of a torn ACL. Newlie cried and muttered and swore in doggy language while this going on, but hid his face in my lap and held no grudge when it was over. He has also had plaque chipped off his teeth at the groomers while not sedated. I hope this helps you both.
 

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Forgot to give my own experience... A ton of good training. A ton of fun excersize. A ton of patience and love and I and my family got the most loyal friend we could ever hope for.
 

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I suppose that there is a reason based on statistics that everything you read has them on dangerous breed lists, most likely to bite, etc. at the same time they are listed as the #2 most popular breed.

This is basically what your wife is reading(it's pretty much the same everywhere)

"German Shepherd Dangerous Dog Breeds
If this is the most preferred breed by police and military units, there is a reason behind it. German Shepherd is an intelligent, aggressive, fearless and confident dog. If German Shepherds are not socialized properly, they can be more attacking towards people, even their owner. According to statistics, German Shepeherd is among five most dangerous dog breeds. Original bred for work, German Shepherds are aggressive dogs who are sometimes not suitable for being a family pet.

However, the dog is protective towards his family, there have been examples in the history where German Shepherd has attacked and killed people."

I don't personally see it with my own or with most of the ones I've met. I have seen a couple that just weren't right and quite scary but I don't know how or why they were that way. The biggest thing with them is training and socialization and it should be ongoing. They make great pets and are loyal dogs. Mine adore kids, but I can see where sometimes it wouldn't work.
Do you mind providing the source for that?

OP, are you sure your wife is understanding what she is reading? I have by no means read everything out there German Shepherd, but I have read a lot, and I have never read or heard of where a German Shepherd is a breed prone to turning on its owner and biting. In fact, the opposite holds true. German Shepherds are the most loyal of breeds and that in itself would make them the most UNlikely to bite its owner.

On the other hand, they are bred to protect and guard, so that could place then higher on the list for more likely to bite somebody else.
 

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Do you mind providing the source for that?

OP, are you sure your wife is understanding what she is reading? I have by no means read everything out there German Shepherd, but I have read a lot, and I have never read or heard of where a German Shepherd is a breed prone to turning on its owner and biting. In fact, the opposite holds true. German Shepherds are the most loyal of breeds and that in itself would make them the most UNlikely to bite its owner.

On the other hand, they are bred to protect and guard, so that could place then higher on the list for more likely to bite somebody else.
Just google it, it's everywhere. I'm not saying that the lists are legit but this is what is on the Internet(more then one site)and what the OPs wife is reading. Heartlandsoul googled it and found the same thing per their post.
 

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Just google it, it's everywhere. I'm not saying that the lists are legit but this is what is on the Internet(more then one site)and what the OPs wife is reading. Heartlandsoul googled it and found the same thing per their post.
I am not saying that I have not seen where GSDs are a dog likely to bite strangers.

I am saying I have never seen anywhere that said they are likely to turn on their owners.

I did just google it and only came up with two articles saying they were prone to attacking their owners. I wouldn't put a lot of credence in two articles. The rest of the articles that came up stated they are not prone to attacking their owners and it is a myth that they are.

I am not saying it never happens, it happens in all breeds, but it is not, and never has been in my lifetime, a trait for which they were noted for.
 

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Tell your wife this

I did rescue for years, fostered countless dogs, used to scope puppy mills/farms. I have pulled some pretty messed up dogs and been bitten, a lot. Went in to remove some small furry dogs and got bitten multiple times, fostered a lab cross and had my arm chewed up, trying to help some mastiff cross got me a hole through my hand. Trying to rescue a male Chow got me a hole in my calf. Cutting the cage wire away from a young male Shepherds foot got me kisses. Comforting a Shepherd bitch dying in labor from a bleed, got me kisses. Lifting a young female Shepherd out of the cage she had been born in got me kisses, and cuddles:D
I have been bitten by GSD's, but some of the worst rescues I helped with were Shepherds and I never got anything but kisses.
If she would like to focus on something let her focus on that.

Good luck with the pup!
 

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By and large dogs that "turn" on there owners are dogs that don't have rules, structure boundaries and limitations (NO) and another commonality would be they don't understand the word "NO!" And that is not "Breed" specific it's a "negligent owner" that can't train there dog! I've "encountered" eight of them so far (dogs with no rules) on "walks" as have many others.

And if an owner happens to be present?? The first words out of there mouth are not "No" or "Stay" or "recalling" the dog, "nope" it's "is your dog friendly??" As there untrained cur bears down on your dog! If people "train" their dogs ... they don't need "aversives!"

So don't provide the part that's underlined add in a powerful breed and throw in resource guarding and "that's" how people get bit! Those are the dogs that "need" "corrections" and people that don't get that are the ones that turn in there dogs, so someone else that does not understand either can, PTS. A ought to know it's limitations. Nuff said on that!

But since the OP has no dog yet doing it right would look like this and I have it on good authority that if you do want to train your dog with out any real corrections to speak of it would look like this:

http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum/how-do-i-teach-my-dog/85869-teaching-focus.html

Pretty much how I trained my Boxer, although I had no idea I was doing it at the time??

With my OS Wl GSD, I had five pack fights with him and my Band dog, I was never able to solve that "because I never delivered a convincing enough aversive! "Wobble" dog so I had "constraints" on what I could do and what I knew at the time. The problem resolved itself when Gunther passed following the last battle due to unrelated issues. :(

Despite his "attitude" with Gunther my dog never came up leash at me. Because I had "most" of the part underlined in place. Round two, HA was solved without "aversives" by showing him what I wanted, "Who Pets my Puppy or Dog" pretty much that simple.

That is in here along with some other info ...
http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum/5296377-post8.html

And for general "puppy" stuff see here and take note of training puppies in the "Place Command."

https://www.youtube.com/user/DogerciseLA/playlists

And a broader overview of "Place" is here:
Fearful, Anxious or Flat Crazy "The Place CommanD - Boxer Forum : Boxer Breed Dog Forums

As I am want to say every dog should know "The Place Command," OP sorry for the slightly off topic "points" but "I" like to:



People need to use the "applicable" "Protocols" for the dog in front of them ... nuff said, Welcome aboard! :)
 

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Hello all, I'm hoping to have my pup in a few weeks and my wife keeps coming up with questions. She read that GSDs are in the top 20 breeds that turn on their folks. I tried to assure her that any dog could do that. Is it true that you have to be more careful with them or is it just coincidental. Thanks ... :halogsd:
If its your dog as a puppy NO WAY can I see this breed turn on their owner unless they were abusive or in circumstances described here "pain...etc but if you teach bite inhibition I bet it wouldn't be hard.

The one time my dog bit me hard was when he was barking at a dog he doesnt like in my old neighborhood and I went to grab his leash attached to the prong and I grabbed a hand full of bottom jaw mid bark and he just... ouch

But with how these dogs bond with their owners I cant imagine a GSD of sane mind and health turning on their owner.
 

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I am not saying that I have not seen where GSDs are a dog likely to bite strangers.

I am saying I have never seen anywhere that said they are likely to turn on their owners.

I did just google it and only came up with two articles saying they were prone to attacking their owners. I wouldn't put a lot of credence in two articles. The rest of the articles that came up stated they are not prone to attacking their owners and it is a myth that they are.

I am not saying it never happens, it happens in all breeds, but it is not, and never has been in my lifetime, a trait for which they were noted for.
It's not articles, it's lists. This isn't about you or your opinion. This is what people find on the Internet when they search things like dangerous dogs or dogs most likely to bite, etc. This is new owners or people doing research on the breed, this is what people are seeing that don't own GSDs. Right or wrong, truth or myth, it is out there.

As an owner of the breed I won't say it's a myth because I know they are powerful dogs. I don't know where the list comes from or what statistics they are looking at to determine it, but it's coming from somewhere. I've been bit(on accident in the middle of a fight) and I can say that within a split second I probably needed stitches and I'm talking a bite and instant release once the dog realized it was me and not the other dog. This bite was not reported and I'm sure that most in these cases aren't, which is how it should be. I can't possibly imagine the damage that could be done by a GSD that bites down and holds. They can do serious damage and in seconds.
 

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I think there's a misconception that GSD's or even pit bulls can turn on their owners. What i think most people do not consider is the background of say an individual case. Was the dog well trained or socialized? How is it treated? Is it crated? etc.
 
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