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Hi

I have a 6 month old pup, I've tried many different types of collars, harnesses and choke/half choke chains and nothing seems to stop him from pulling when we are out for a walk. At the moment he has a half choke on him, is there any recommendations out there that have worked for people in the past?

Tej
 

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Prong Collar. It works like a charm. You could also try the Gentle Leader, but imo prongs are better.

Even my pup takes advantage of the choke collar when walking, so I don't use it.
 

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I had really good success following Tyler Muto's leash pressure (sometimes he call them conversational leash work) techniques. He has several videos available on youtube.

The basic idea is that you work in low distraction environments to develop good leash manners such as reacting to slight pressure.

We have a kind of weird structure to our walks.
1. 1-2 minutes of figure-8's (follow me yield to me) drills in the driveway. With lots of praise and rewards for good behavior. As soon as things are going well we head out.
2. 2-5 minutes of loose leash walking. This is pretty informal for us. I take a grip on my leash so that there is a 3-6 inch loop of slack where the leach connects to ole's collar. This way, pup is free to roam around on my lefts side within a small radius. I try to remember to swing my left arm in a normal walking manner. Then pup gets a gentle reminder when he has gone too far ahead and my arm is in a backswing.
3. Most of the walk is in a explore mode where Ole can wander around within the radius of his leash as long as he doesn't pull. If for any reason pup pulls rudely, I do an abrupt u-turn. Over time pup has learned that if he pulls rudely towards something, he ends up going the opposite direction. If he makes a gentle tug, like excited 6-month-old pups are prone to do, I just stop until he releases the leash pressure and looks at me. Then we move forward again. Over time pup has learned that even if he is excited he needs to stop pulling and check in with me if he wants us to go check out something interesting.
4. During the walk, if we pass close by someone I cue a loose walk again and reward heavily.
5. At the end of the walk, we do a minute or so of loose leash walking as we get back home.
6. When we get back home or get to a park or open field, I cue 'go play' so pup has a few minutes of playtime as a reward for a good walk.

The times and specific drills probably don't matter all that much. The idea is that we start in a low distraction environment with a lot of control. pup has learned (i think) that the sooner he show self-control, the sooner he earns more freedom. Pup likes explore walks and he loves 'go play' so he is willing to work for them. I think he even enjoys loose leash walks in busy places, he holds his tail up and struts around, "Yep, I'm a good dog who gets to go everywhere" :)

For a couple of weeks, we barely made in through the conversational leash work and down the driveway before it was time to come back in. Now, he heads straight to the driveway every time we go outside.

Finally, as @Kathrynil stated, we use a prong collar. With other collars, it seemed like ole got satisfaction out of pulling against a collar. I don't know if that was just his personality or my poor leash work. I got the feeling that he felt a leash and collar were confrontational, ie he got more stubborn on a leash and I got more stubborn with a leash in my hand. With a prong collar, I never hold the leash with more than my first finger and thumb. This way we are both more sensitive to what the other is doing. No more pulling.

I would encourage using a backup collar with a prong collar. The inexpensive prong collars can bend and come off if the dog lunges. Ole bent a cheap Petco collar lunging after a squirrel. There are few feelings a bad as having your reactive dog break his collar during an explosion.
 

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Yes, Agreed with @davewis Buy a Hermsprenger Prong collar and use a backup. I just use a strong caribiner and they work great.
 

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You have used a variety of tools, but have you actually put time in teaching your pup how to walk on a leash? Dogs instinctively pull against pressure, it is called the opposition reflex. Dogs do not naturally give to pressure they must be taught. Tools like a prong collar make pulling unpleasant, but often once removed the dog will go right back to pulling.

There are many different methods to teach loose leash walking. Do some research and select the one you feel is right for you and put the time in training your pup.

I like Denise Fenzi's circle method, it's a very simple method to follow. There will be a webinar about the method on March 26.
 

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Yes, the tool is just that, a tool. The real progress comes from the time spent working together.

That being said, the tool helped this inexperienced trainer by reducing undesirable behaviors (from both of us) so that we could focus on rewarding good behavior and building a positive (non-confrontational) relationship.

Now, when he is off-leash, Ole sometimes comes up and walks in a loose leash position for a little while just to check-in before heading off to chase another butterfly :) I figure that is a sign that he finds walking on my left side rewarding rather than something he is coerced into doing.

I was planning on waiting a few months before we started formally teaching off-leash loose leash walking.
 

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The biggest thing (to me) isn't the tool that you choose, but the timing by the handler. The idea is NOT to let the collar work when the leash gets tight. You want to give a correction in advance of the leash getting tight.
If the pup gets too far out in front, turn in the other direction. If they don't follow you or don't notice, give a quick leash pop, and they will.
Larry Krohn has a ton of youtube videos teaching this.
 

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@Bramble are you referring to Denise Fenzi - The Fenzi Method: Cutting Corners to Loose Leash Walking (REPEAT) I am always looking to learn :)

I wish there was an option to remove formatting in this editor. It often seems to change fonts after I check a word's spelling with Grammarly :(
 

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@Bramble are you referring to Denise Fenzi - The Fenzi Method: Cutting Corners to Loose Leash Walking (REPEAT) I am always looking to learn :)

I wish there was an option to remove formatting in this editor. It often seems to change fonts after I check a word's spelling with Grammarly :(
Yes that is the one.
 

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We actually used small bits of chicken. We’d walk a few steps and when the pup tried pulling away, I had chicken at my side. Only to be given when the pup would come back and stay at my side. Reward. We’d try walking again and almost a half block and she would pull. I stop. Already had chicken in my hand and patiently wait for her to come back to my side. Reward. She walks beautifully now. No pulling. It took about 2-3 weeks. She doesn’t wear a prong. She wears a harness.
 

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prong collar 100%. I make him walk by my side, any time he gets a little ahead of me, tight pull then release when he gets next to you. Also practice turning while walking, meaning if hes on your left side, turn to the right and pull if he does not follow then release once by your side again. This makes it so your dog learns to always pay attention to you and what you are doing. My boy now is constantly looking up at me, when I stop he stops. Be consistent!
Hi

I have a 6 month old pup, I've tried many different types of collars, harnesses and choke/half choke chains and nothing seems to stop him from pulling when we are out for a walk. At the moment he has a half choke on him, is there any recommendations out there that have worked for people in the past?

Tej
[/QUOTE
 

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Reading through this thread makes it clear that there are a lot of people using a prong incorrectly and that it has obviously become a replacement to training.
OP- although his methods are presumed outdated by some I like Koehlers method of teaching a loose leash walk. Changes in direction and speed with no warning will teach your dog to stay beside you and watch what you are doing. I still do circles and figure 8's with my dog when she starts getting wound up.
I would also suggest the luring method described here. I had a dog that was nuts about peanut butter. I used to put it in an icing tube and head out with it in my left hand at my side. If she moved ahead I simply raised my hand out of reach. If she stayed at beside me she got little random squeezes of PB.
I used to joke that as a breed GSD's seem to enjoy being choked. I've never met a single one that did not love pulling on a leash, if they were allowed to start.
 

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I use a prong collar with both of mine. But I had to put a fair amount of time into structured walking. My male Odin, still will occasionally have a slight pull on walks, but if its a light pressure I let him. As long as I do not feel like he is walking me or pulling me along and I still have control over where we go. He walks faster then me and Layla and usually likes to walk ahead slightly if we are on unstructured walks to sniff every little thing. But if I need him to walk by my side he will. I tried everything under the sun but a prong collar is the only thing that worked. He is too strong for me with any other type of collar. And its helpful when needed to correct them on walks if they decide to bark at another dog. I simply can have them sit and apply a slight tug if the let out a bark. Usually after a quick correction and "quiet" they are good to go..
 
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