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Hello!

I have a healthy 10 months german sheperd. I have him since he was 4 months and everything went quite fine (I was training him and gave him plenty of exercise ~ 2hrs / day) untill 2 months ago when I first saw him tail its chase. At first I wasn't so worried because it usually lasted like a few seconds, but after a while it became worse. I couldn't even take him for a walk because he would literally just stand there chasing its tail, barking and completely ignoring me. He displayed this behaviour only whenever I was around him. If I tried to take him for a walk or play with him, he would also ignore me and continue chasing and barking at its tail. So after doing some research I found out this is usually called obsessive compulsive behaviour and sought some help.

After talking to a few behaviourist (i think that's what they are called) and to a veterinarian, they recommened to spend even more time with him. So I actually improved the time I spend with him to like 4hrs / day and his behaviour improved a lot. However he became very stubborn and he would rarely answer my commands now. But still, whenever I ignore him and work in the garden around him he would start barking at its tail but it's different than it was before, because if I would go and play with him when he barks at its tail, he would also come and play with me.
But if I completely ignore him, sometimes he would calm down on its own.

It is possible that his obsessive behaviour became a habit to attract attention? Did I unconsciously reinforce that habit by giving him attention whenever he acted like that?
If so, what should I do?

And another problem I have with him is pulling the leash. He's very strong and it's pulling like a beast, and by doing this he sometimes is choking himself. I thought about buying a prong collar, but that seems painful.
How can I teach him to have a proper walk that is also not a nightmare for me and for him too?
 

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If the behavior is related to true ODC, it is biologically based and didn't become a habit due to his environment/learning. You are reinforcing the behavior by playing with him when he is attending to his tail and strengthening the behavior. Try leaving him instead. In order to benefit from a prong collar, you need to learn how to use it. Try walking with him a few feet and when he is forging/pulling, make an abrupt right turn and drive hard into the opposite direction making sure the dog comes with you. Continue to repeat this and the dog will learn not to forge. At certain times dogs need corrections that involve pain. Avoiding them is really a disservice to your dog. Dogs can be manipulative. You are not going to injure your dog unless you give a very extreme correction.
 

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Hello!

I have a healthy 10 months german sheperd. I have him since he was 4 months and everything went quite fine (I was training him and gave him plenty of exercise ~ 2hrs / day) untill 2 months ago when I first saw him tail its chase. At first I wasn't so worried because it usually lasted like a few seconds, but after a while it became worse. I couldn't even take him for a walk because he would literally just stand there chasing its tail, barking and completely ignoring me. He displayed this behaviour only whenever I was around him. If I tried to take him for a walk or play with him, he would also ignore me and continue chasing and barking at its tail. So after doing some research I found out this is usually called obsessive compulsive behaviour and sought some help.

After talking to a few behaviourist (i think that's what they are called) and to a veterinarian, they recommened to spend even more time with him. So I actually improved the time I spend with him to like 4hrs / day and his behaviour improved a lot. However he became very stubborn and he would rarely answer my commands now. But still, whenever I ignore him and work in the garden around him he would start barking at its tail but it's different than it was before, because if I would go and play with him when he barks at its tail, he would also come and play with me.
But if I completely ignore him, sometimes he would calm down on its own.

It is possible that his obsessive behaviour became a habit to attract attention? Did I unconsciously reinforce that habit by giving him attention whenever he acted like that?
If so, what should I do?

And another problem I have with him is pulling the leash. He's very strong and it's pulling like a beast, and by doing this he sometimes is choking himself. I thought about buying a prong collar, but that seems painful.
How can I teach him to have a proper walk that is also not a nightmare for me and for him too?
OK, so I will try to respond as simply as I can - I went through this with our Ziva. She started when she was about 7 or 8 months. I sent a video to the trainer and she said, "Oh you have a spinner!" Can be bloodline related. Basically, the dog doesn't know what to do and starts this crazy spinning.

HOW DID WE STOP IT? As soon as he starts you must distract him. What we did was make a noise or command to divert her. Eventually, I taught her to run to the end of the yard and return to me and sit. Eventually, it would be sit or platz, then 1 2 3 go! She'd run run run as far as she could and then come right back to do it again. and again and again. She LOVED it. It was a really useless skill, but it was great for winding her down. You could make your command anything - roll over, heel, anything as long as you catch him immediately when he's starting to spin. It's definitely OCD and will really never go away. And please don't breed him.
 
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