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This guy came right through the yard mid day today, calm and bold as can be. Stopped to look around until I ripped open the door (not 30 feet from him) and yelled at him. I have seen their scat on the trail near my house quite a bit recently too and have to be vigilant, concerned about the dogs sniffing at it. He was maybe 40-50 pounds, coat not in great shape and a really skinny rat tail, not bushy at all. Didn't look like mange but not really healthy either
I don't know how far west of Toronto you are but the City of Vaughan is having a problem with bold coyotes right now, There have been three incidents of a coyote approaching people in full daylight and nipping them. Three people are under rabies preventative treatment now. It is not known if it is a single coyote doing this or several on different occasions but around here coyotes are large, well fed and quite habituated to humans and pets. My daughter lives on a wetland/ravine area north of Toronto with an unfenced yard and is seeing coyotes on her property during the day, which is not usual at this time of the year. Wherever you are, please be cautious.
 

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Discussion Starter #62
I don't know how far west of Toronto you are but the City of Vaughan is having a problem with bold coyotes right now, There have been three incidents of a coyote approaching people in full daylight and nipping them. Three people are under rabies preventative treatment now. It is not known if it is a single coyote doing this or several on different occasions but around here coyotes are large, well fed and quite habituated to humans and pets. My daughter lives on a wetland/ravine area north of Toronto with an unfenced yard and is seeing coyotes on her property during the day, which is not usual at this time of the year. Wherever you are, please be cautious.
I'm just north of Burlington, unfenced true ravine property with a stream and 20 foot natural waterfall bordered by an ESA (Environmental Protected Area) that follows upstream and woods and connected to hundreds of miles of Bruce Trail and huge pond on the other side. Perfect coyote and deer territory and we see lots of both particularly as they are building up subdivisions up around us. And yes, they are very habituated to people and my neighbor has has issues with them. Her neighbor has 5 bird errrr squirrel feeders out aka the coyote buffet.

I carry a 5' very stout walking stick, have 200 pounds of GSD with me and a knife on my belt. Not to sound too violent, but if a coyote got close enough to nip me, I would have it's body left over for them to test for rabies and wouldn't need the rabies preventative shots. I for sure could crack a skull or shoulder blade. :cautious: I have seen them literally hundreds of times over the last 20 years and never have they not run when confronted. I really like seeing them in the wild but they will just watch and become bold if you are nonchalant with them.
 

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Discussion Starter #63

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I live in the city, but coyotes are pretty common here, too. I suppose it's easy pickins' for them since there are plenty of squirrels, stray cats and not-too-secure garbage cans. Our local population ranges from the beach to the mountains- they follow the riverbeds into the city.

For the most part, the coyotes out here are tiny. I've been seeing them frequently for maybe the last 20 years and have yet to come across one more than 25 lbs. The ones I run off in the pre-dawn hours are the size of large cats. They are small, but bold. Solo coyotes have followed me and Gunnar (and previously, Spike and Rocco) for as long as a mile. We always run them off, but they always trail us at a distance. They break off once we get to the main street and its heavy traffic.
 

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We are moving to the general Newmarket area next year with a property that backs on to conservation land. My goofy boy is a fence jumper, don't think he will be allowed in the back yard without supervision!
 

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We are moving to the general Newmarket area next year with a property that backs on to conservation land. My goofy boy is a fence jumper, don't think he will be allowed in the back yard without supervision!
My last dogs were loose many days in our unfenced yard over ~20 years in all but the worst weather. Never once did I open the door to find they weren't there. All that's changed now.
 

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My last two GSDs would not leave the property and we are in a very suburban area. If they happened to get out an open gate we would find them patiently waiting on the front porch for someone to let them in. My current guy, Remy, is an overseas rescue and a flight risk, always will be. He was used to doing his own thing for the first three years of his life and just wants to go walk-about and explore. Prevention is the only solution we think, and a well-latched gate on a 6 foot fence.
 

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Coyotes have taken a couple of small animals in my neighborhood in Cincinnati. Most recently, a few weeks ago, they attacked a small dog (second such attack in the last year in a relatively small neighborhood), and let the dog alone when some humans showed up. They have reportedly taken some cats as well. No aggressiveness toward humans so far, but reportedly, they have become pretty brazen about showing up even in broad daylight. This area well within in the city limits, and has been for well over a hundred years. Not a matter of humans encroaching on "their" territory, but rather resourceful coyotes moving in where they can find occasional deer, rabbits, and take shelter in a wooded ravine which usually has water.

In Nova Scotia a few years back, a young woman was fatally mauled by coyotes. This is the only fatal attack I've ever heard or read about in North America. Pasted in is some interesting stuff from the Wikipedia article. The RCMP are pretty sure they got their man, in that a coyote they trapped had traces of her blood on his coat, and his fur pattern matched photos other folks had taken of a very brazen, even aggressive male coyote.

"There was speculation by wildlife experts that Mitchell might have initiated contact by trying to feed coyotes or by disturbing a den with young.[8] Various other proposed explanations why the unusual attack occurred included that the coyotes might have been larger and bolder than normal coyotes because they were crosses with wolves or domestic dogs, rabid, starving, or protecting a carcass.[8] None of these suggestions were subsequently borne out, causing a reassessment of potential risk to humans from coyote attacks. It was also thought by experts that Mitchell may have inadvertently provoked a predation behaviour by running away, though a coyote may have been behind her when she was confronted by the oncoming ones.[8][14][17][18]

As is standard practice when an animal remains at large after killing a human, wardens searched for the attacker animal in the vicinity, where five or six coyotes were believed to live.[8] Mitchell's mother issued a statement saying that her daughter would not have wanted her death to result in the extermination of the coyotes: “We take a calculated risk when spending time in nature’s fold — it’s the wildlife’s terrain,” she wrote. “When the decision had been made to kill the pack of coyotes, I clearly heard Taylor’s voice say, ‘Please don’t, this is their space.’ She wouldn’t have wanted their demise, especially as a result of her own."[19]

Nonetheless, hours after the incident, while the trail was closed to the public, a female coyote that acted aggressively was killed by a warden keeping watch at the washhouse location. Three others within 1 kilometre (0.62 mi) of the Skyline trail were caught in leg-hold traps and killed before a large male weighing 42 pounds (19 kg) was similarly dispatched 5 kilometres (3.1 mi) away on November 14. Scientific investigation of the carcasses determined that three, including the first and last accounted for, were linked to the attack on Mitchell by her blood on their coats and other forensic evidence. The large male coyote was found to have been both the dominant lead coyote photographed on the access road and the one found standing over Mitchell; coat markings in the photographs identified its carcass, which also contained pellets from the shotgun of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police officer who fired while at the scene. The dead coyotes not linked to the attack may have been pack-mates of the attackers.[8] The large male and the female may have been a breeding pair; both were related to the other attack-implicated coyote."
 

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Neighborhood coyote, Cincinnati. Neighbor who lives behind my house forwarded. Behind the houses pictured lies the deep ravine where they most likely have their den.
Couple houses back in the direction he is trotting from is the house where small dog got taken.
 

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I'm just north of Burlington, unfenced true ravine property with a stream and 20 foot natural waterfall bordered by an ESA (Environmental Protected Area) that follows upstream and woods and connected to hundreds of miles of Bruce Trail and huge pond on the other side. Perfect coyote and deer territory and we see lots of both particularly as they are building up subdivisions up around us. And yes, they are very habituated to people and my neighbor has has issues with them. Her neighbor has 5 bird errrr squirrel feeders out aka the coyote buffet.

I carry a 5' very stout walking stick, have 200 pounds of GSD with me and a knife on my belt. Not to sound too violent, but if a coyote got close enough to nip me, I would have it's body left over for them to test for rabies and wouldn't need the rabies preventative shots. I for sure could crack a skull or shoulder blade. :cautious: I have seen them literally hundreds of times over the last 20 years and never have they not run when confronted. I really like seeing them in the wild but they will just watch and become bold if you are nonchalant with them.
You don’t want to injure the head/crack the skull if it’s to be sent in for rabies testing. Although if it actually bit you they’d make an exception I’m sure. But info for anybody particularly if you have a gun, if you plan on taking in an animal for rabies testing because of abnormal behaviors don’t shoot it in the head.
 

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some of ya'll need a strong bb gun.. shoot them in the haunches when they are near you or your house. do that a few times and they will take a wide birth of your home (i would do other things, but that's me :) )
 

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In this city you can't even let fly with a pellet gun or a bow without breaking some law. The houses are pretty close together in this areas.

That said, if they got in my backyard after my dogs, I'd take care of them first, ask permission later. But I have never actually seen them in my yard. The house in photo above is around the block from me. I have seen a coyote of similar size cross a busy four lane city street about a quarter mile away.

My profile pic girl weighs about 70-72 lbs now and barks like she weighs 85. My wife has encountered two coyotes while walking at night (or maybe same one twice), and our female GSD lights up and coyote takes off. But the dog is on a leash, and we do not let her chase.
 

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Discussion Starter #75
You don’t want to injure the head/crack the skull if it’s to be sent in for rabies testing. Although if it actually bit you they’d make an exception I’m sure. But info for anybody particularly if you have a gun, if you plan on taking in an animal for rabies testing because of abnormal behaviors don’t shoot it in the head.
I'm limited in what I can carry where I live. No setting off guns anywhere in city limits even though I border hundreds of miles of wild trails. The walking staff carry is only to wave off a curious coyote or potentially to forcefully separate it from my dog(s). Highly unlikely considering they are terrified of my dog and immediately run if they're spotted. Good to know re their head though.
 

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In this city you can't even let fly with a pellet gun or a bow without breaking some law. The houses are pretty close together in this areas.

That said, if they got in my backyard after my dogs, I'd take care of them first, ask permission later. But I have never actually seen them in my yard. The house in photo above is around the block from me. I have seen a coyote of similar size cross a busy four lane city street about a quarter mile away.

My profile pic girl weighs about 70-72 lbs now and barks like she weighs 85. My wife has encountered two coyotes while walking at night (or maybe same one twice), and our female GSD lights up and coyote takes off. But the dog is on a leash, and we do not let her chase.
it's amazing how these dogs can sound so much bigger than what they actually are. not to mention the power they have. We have moved in with my in laws until the new house is ready and we have to walk her (no fenced in back yard) several times a day. no biggie, but she has begun to pull on the leash recently (trying to correct this and working on other training too). I'm a fairly large guy and it can easily take 3.5 of her to equal my weight, but when she sees something she wants, she goes!

perfect example i was coming back from a walk with her after work, and my wife came home with TH (tiny hooman/karma's baby), and my wife set her on the ground to crawl around (country setting and soft grass), karma instantly saw her TH, and pulled like a freight train to get to her and give lovin's..

Karma was scared of a couple deer we encountered the other night, but i've heard her bark before.. i'm sure a yote wont come near us, but if one did, Karma would be the least of it's worry ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #77
Coyotes are near virtually every subdivision anywhere near green space in the Great Toronto Area.
There's non-stop development going on and no end in sight anywhere within 2 hours of here. And the coyotes have been pushed out and settle right back in. Predictably, when people and nature overlap too far, people ruin nature and nature strikes back.


Newmarket dog attacked by pack of coyotes in daylight on local trail

'Be careful': Residents in Oakville neighbourhood warned after coyote snatches and kills dog

Burlington man calls for action after dog bitten by coyote

Police issue alert after boy bitten by coyote

Coyotes spotted in urban Milton

Mississauga woman says she was attacked by pack of coyotes - CityNews Toronto

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/hamilton/keeping-safe-from-coyotes-hamilton-has-tips-1.4909545
 

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Walking our two tonight, we cut off the bike and walking trail, and looped through the high school, the back area of which doubles as a public park. My girl spotted a coyote at maybe 75 yards in a softball diamond; lit up barking.
Then we saw another one outside the diamond but headed in that direction. Second one appeared bigger. They kept their distance but by no means ran away. Six miles from downtown Cincinnati. This area has been densely settled for over 100 years, but they find pockets of woods for cover. Probably rabbit hunting.
 

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We have one that comes right through the yard regularly, just saw him again yesterday; smallish, confident, wary. Neighbor feeds the squirrels and brings them around.

Harley will run them off and now that the leaves are off the trees, I'll let him. Rogan at a year is a few months off that, then I'll let the 100 pounder have a run at them, he has tremendous prey drive and good recall. Hopefully the yotes get the message.
 

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I spent many many hours walking in the woods, and seldom have seen coyotes. But as we were wrapping up an evening hunt for deer one night, my friend suggested trying out a new call he got recently, specifically for predators. So he called, maybe 3 times.

I was, and am do this day, amazed at how quickly we were surrounded by coyotes! We could hear and even see bushes moving, but didn't once actually see a coyote!

Point is, everytime you're out in the woods they are all around you. Not a problem, but ready at the drop of a hat to move in if the situation warrants it.

Coyotes are typically not a problem. There are exceptions, and they can be dangerous, though not the usual case, and certainly not something one has to be "worried" about all the time! IMHO...

I personally think that domestic dogs running loose are a much bigger threat, and always have been!
 
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