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We have coyotes come from High Park (a block away) into the neighbourhood, plus see them in the park. We've seen them on the dog trails and right at the entrance to the park during the day with dozens of people walking past.

Our beagle is tall for a beagle but still a shrimp (though not compared to a toy poodle) so we keep an eye out. Neb is probably coyote sized but we let him off-leash (unless someone says they just saw one) on the dog trails. Same with Agis, who is a shrimp for his mix but who is still biggest of all our boys. Nebbers though - he's had way bigger dogs go after him, and consistently finishes fights other dogs start. He has mellowed with age (12), so we prefer not to test that too much.
 

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@cagal Wasn't out by Burlington or Hamilton a decent-sized doodle type dog mauled and killed on the Bruce Trail a few years ago? Though they're not particularly intimidating dogs, per @WNGD 's point.
Yes. I believe so. We also had at least one really small dog taken off a driveway here in Mississauga. I see lots in our area as we have a large wildlife corridor behind us. We also had a beaver a few years back on the little creek behind us. Glad we never ran into that - another dog owner told me they’re really vicious.
 

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Yes. I believe so. We also had at least one really small dog taken off a driveway here in Mississauga. I see lots in our area as we have a large wildlife corridor behind us. We also had a beaver a few years back on the little creek behind us. Glad we never ran into that - another dog owner told me they’re really vicious.
Really! Whod've thought beavers would be!
 

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@cagal Wasn't out by Burlington or Hamilton a decent-sized doodle type dog mauled and killed on the Bruce Trail a few years ago? Though they're not particularly intimidating dogs, per @WNGD 's point.
I remember the story but not where exactly. The Bruce Trail is right out my back door (100 yards through the woods) so those are the same coyotes I see. Small, curious .... and scared of an Alpha GSD. My older male dog (small-ish 80 pounds) has run him/she/them off dozens of times. Always in my sight never an issue.

They want nothing to do with an aggressive pizzed off Alpha GSD imo. And my older dog is the biggest suck with people you'd ever meet.

There was also video I think in Oakville of a coyote jumping a fence and going after a small dog in someone's yard. They'll even approach a small dog on a leash. and they take cats regularly if they can.
 

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I remember the story but not where exactly. The Bruce Trail is right out my back door (100 yards through the woods) so those are the same coyotes I see. Small, curious .... and scared of an Alpha GSD. My older male dog (small-ish 80 pounds) has run him/she/them off dozens of times. Always in my sight never an issue.

They want nothing to do with an aggressive pizzed off Alpha GSD imo. And my older dog is the biggest suck with people you'd ever meet.

There was also video I think in Oakville of a coyote jumping a fence and going after a small dog in someone's yard. They'll even approach a small dog on a leash. and they take cats regularly if they can.
Oh yeah my husband's family all lives in Oakville and they've had cats killed.

I had a friend up...King Township? way get surrounded a pack of coyotes with his viszla. Surprised me because it wasn't a small dog. That's a while back though.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Oh yeah my husband's family all lives in Oakville and they've had cats killed.

I had a friend up...King Township? way get surrounded a pack of coyotes with his viszla. Surprised me because it wasn't a small dog. That's a while back though.
It's not just the size of the dog but it's attitude, demeanor and ability. Coyotes are smart and part of playing with dogs in yards is really sizing them up.

A Viszla is not an Alpha dog but a Jack Russell Terrior will run off animals twice their size for instance. A dog that whimpers, runs away or tucks its tail will draw more interest. A barking, snarling, straining Alpha GSD will not, except an interest in running away from it:oops:
 

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Pack dogs that hunt together will quickly disable a victim dog by biting into the back leg tendons...and that's all she wrote. The victim dog can't even retreat. Didn't even know what was happening.

Pack hunters are a menace to civilized society.

There a very good reason why our grandparents, great caretakers of the land hunted wolves to extinction.
 

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All predators are here for a reason and should be valued to help keep nature in balance. Without preds, rabbits, deer and mice populations for instance, skyrocket out of control

I have zero problems with coyotes and wolves are beautiful. Just stay out of my yard and away from my dogs please:giggle:
 

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I live in western Montana where we have a full suite of predators and big game (minus grizzly bears...yet). Willow hikes with me off-leash everywhere. She generally stays close. She will chase deer and squirrels when given the chance, but her obedience to "leave it" is very good (I've worked especially hard on that, for her and the wildlife's safety). I just have to catch her and say "leave it" before she goes into chase mode.

So far, we have come into close proximity to deer, moose, and, most recently, some very habituated mountain goats. The moose and goats scare me the most, obviously. But Willow has been very good, and generally I'm quick to put her on the leash as soon as we see the moose or goat, in case she decides to go for it unexpectedly.

Predator-wise, I do worry about wolves. They'll go after dogs because they see them as competition. Wolves frequently kill lion hounds (i.e. hound dogs used for mountain lion hunting in the winter). But those hounds range pretty far from their handlers in the course of a lion hunt, and since Willow keeps close, I guess I don't have much reason to worry; but it's on my mind.

Haven't run into any bears yet. And I think Willow's too big to be a temptation for a lion; lions generally run from wolf-sized dogs. Admittedly I use Willow as an early bear detection system; bears are stinky and if she smells one, I'll know and can prepare for a possible encounter (I think).

The kicker to all this, though, is that a sick animal won't respond the way they normally do. Rabies, distemper, other ailments among carnivores could lead to unpredictable behavior so it's important to be conscious of that possibility.

EDIT also I should add that coyotes aren't really an issue here, unless you have outdoor cats. One of the many benefits of bringing wolves back to an ecosystem is that they prey upon coyotes when given the chance, which instills some healthy fear into the coyote population and keeps their numbers down.

I also have seen Willow go full-on hackles-up lunging at dogs that came into our yard and/or rushed at us during a walk. So I think she'd try to defend herself/me from a wild canid. Maybe. I hope never to know.
 

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When I go up north I definitely worry about wolves and moose too, @banzai555! I've seen moose far away with the dogs and we hustle out there. Luckily no close encounters.
 

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@saintbob the tendon thing is true! After I called Hunter off the coyote kept trying to sneak in and bite at Hunter’s back leg. Hunter was on alert and kept checking back so the coyote never got close enough and basically Hunter kept warning him off. If Hunter had caught him close enough the coyote wouldn’t have stood a chance. I think he could have handled 2 possibly but no way could he handle 3. And Hunter was a big boy and very capable of defending himself. We had deer around but they would just run away. I was always worried when the bucks showed up though. They’re good with antlers to defend themselves.
 

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I had a mink come charging out of the woods at me last week. Surpised, I screamed. It stopped, decided I was quite a bit larger and turned around. He was probably nose to tip of tail ONE foot long. Guess I showed him!
 

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There are 5 foxes that live on my property. Since I have poultry, it's a constant game of chess.

It was easier living somewhere without them, but they're here. Early this morning one of them crapped on the milk delivery cooler that I left outside overnight. I used to keep some of my agility equipment outside, until the foxes started pooping in the entry of the tunnel. Territorial little devils.

I'd rather deal with foxes and coyotes than mink. The only animal I'm ever pleased to see run over in the road around here are mink. There used to be a mink farm near here a few years ago, and escapees would find their way to my birds.... horrible. At least coyotes/foxes/hawks will kill something and consume it. I had a mink get into a bird pen once.... ripped off all the heads, necks torn up, whole dead bird bodies everywhere.
 

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I live in western Montana where we have a full suite of predators and big game (minus grizzly bears...yet). Willow hikes with me off-leash everywhere. She generally stays close. She will chase deer and squirrels when given the chance, but her obedience to "leave it" is very good (I've worked especially hard on that, for her and the wildlife's safety). I just have to catch her and say "leave it" before she goes into chase mode.

So far, we have come into close proximity to deer, moose, and, most recently, some very habituated mountain goats. The moose and goats scare me the most, obviously. But Willow has been very good, and generally I'm quick to put her on the leash as soon as we see the moose or goat, in case she decides to go for it unexpectedly.

Predator-wise, I do worry about wolves. They'll go after dogs because they see them as competition. Wolves frequently kill lion hounds (i.e. hound dogs used for mountain lion hunting in the winter). But those hounds range pretty far from their handlers in the course of a lion hunt, and since Willow keeps close, I guess I don't have much reason to worry; but it's on my mind.

Haven't run into any bears yet. And I think Willow's too big to be a temptation for a lion; lions generally run from wolf-sized dogs. Admittedly I use Willow as an early bear detection system; bears are stinky and if she smells one, I'll know and can prepare for a possible encounter (I think).

The kicker to all this, though, is that a sick animal won't respond the way they normally do. Rabies, distemper, other ailments among carnivores could lead to unpredictable behavior so it's important to be conscious of that possibility.

EDIT also I should add that coyotes aren't really an issue here, unless you have outdoor cats. One of the many benefits of bringing wolves back to an ecosystem is that they prey upon coyotes when given the chance, which instills some healthy fear into the coyote population and keeps their numbers down.

I also have seen Willow go full-on hackles-up lunging at dogs that came into our yard and/or rushed at us during a walk. So I think she'd try to defend herself/me from a wild canid. Maybe. I hope never to know.
Thats because they (bears) are all in N Idaho and NE Washington:)
 

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Discussion Starter #37
There are 5 foxes that live on my property. Since I have poultry, it's a constant game of chess.

It was easier living somewhere without them, but they're here. Early this morning one of them crapped on the milk delivery cooler that I left outside overnight. I used to keep some of my agility equipment outside, until the foxes started pooping in the entry of the tunnel. Territorial little devils.

I'd rather deal with foxes and coyotes than mink. The only animal I'm ever pleased to see run over in the road around here are mink. There used to be a mink farm near here a few years ago, and escapees would find their way to my birds.... horrible. At least coyotes/foxes/hawks will kill something and consume it. I had a mink get into a bird pen once.... ripped off all the heads, necks torn up, whole dead bird bodies everywhere.
We had a family of foxes den up in the ravine in front of my house for a few years in a row. The had no trouble showing off young kids when I was 50 yards away in plain view.

The male used to tease my last female GSD regularly and Mom would come right through the yards to see if my girl was on the porch before bringing the kits through 10 minutes later.

When the coyotes arrived in the area more frequently, the foxes moved on from denning around here.
 

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I live in western Montana where we have a full suite of predators and big game (minus grizzly bears...yet). Willow hikes with me off-leash everywhere. She generally stays close. She will chase deer and squirrels when given the chance, but her obedience to "leave it" is very good (I've worked especially hard on that, for her and the wildlife's safety). I just have to catch her and say "leave it" before she goes into chase mode.

So far, we have come into close proximity to deer, moose, and, most recently, some very habituated mountain goats. The moose and goats scare me the most, obviously. But Willow has been very good, and generally I'm quick to put her on the leash as soon as we see the moose or goat, in case she decides to go for it unexpectedly.

Predator-wise, I do worry about wolves. They'll go after dogs because they see them as competition. Wolves frequently kill lion hounds (i.e. hound dogs used for mountain lion hunting in the winter). But those hounds range pretty far from their handlers in the course of a lion hunt, and since Willow keeps close, I guess I don't have much reason to worry; but it's on my mind.

Haven't run into any bears yet. And I think Willow's too big to be a temptation for a lion; lions generally run from wolf-sized dogs. Admittedly I use Willow as an early bear detection system; bears are stinky and if she smells one, I'll know and can prepare for a possible encounter (I think).

The kicker to all this, though, is that a sick animal won't respond the way they normally do. Rabies, distemper, other ailments among carnivores could lead to unpredictable behavior so it's important to be conscious of that possibility.

EDIT also I should add that coyotes aren't really an issue here, unless you have outdoor cats. One of the many benefits of bringing wolves back to an ecosystem is that they prey upon coyotes when given the chance, which instills some healthy fear into the coyote population and keeps their numbers down.

I also have seen Willow go full-on hackles-up lunging at dogs that came into our yard and/or rushed at us during a walk. So I think she'd try to defend herself/me from a wild canid. Maybe. I hope never to know.
Eastern Montana coyotes are a far larger problem if there is gonna be one. Bears I am worried about where I live. I literally live right next to a place called Bear Canyon lol. Moose honestly terrify me with dogs because they can be very dangerous and aren't afraid to go after one.
 

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Here (I hope) is the link to the Doberman and the coyotes.

I did not re-watch the whole thing, but right off, you see there are as many as five adult coyotes. Hard to gauge the Dobe's size, with no human or other dog in perspective, but he certainly does not look under-sized and appears bigger than any individual coyote.

The concern with mini-packs of this sort is that just as in nature, while one pack animal occupies the business end of the opponent, the other's can attack the rear or the flank.

I do find it a little unnerving that the owner did not just call his dog back to stay with him.
 

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Here (I hope) is the link to the Doberman and the coyotes.

I did not re-watch the whole thing, but right off, you see there are as many as five adult coyotes. Hard to gauge the Dobe's size, with no human or other dog in perspective, but he certainly does not look under-sized and appears bigger than any individual coyote.

The concern with mini-packs of this sort is that just as in nature, while one pack animal occupies the business end of the opponent, the other's can attack the rear or the flank.

I do find it a little unnerving that the owner did not just call his dog back to stay with him.
me, personally, in this situation, karma would be on a leash at my side (she isn't gun shy), my side arm would have been drawn and one or two rounds been fired at the closest yote. those yote's are showing zero to very minimal fear towards the dog and human. Doing this could potentially save someone else's dog on that trail, or decrease the chances of such a dangerous encounter from happening again. I love my Karma (and bubba but he doesn't walk lol), and i know she would defend me and my girls, and she needs to know i would do the same for her.
 
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