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People feed them either on purpose or by feeding outdoor pets, or just leaving food accessible to them. They have become fearless.
 

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Discussion Starter · #222 ·
People feed them either on purpose or by feeding outdoor pets, or just leaving food accessible to them. They have become fearless.
Thousands of squirrels and plenty of outdoor cats are the main culprits around here. Oddly enough, maybe due to the trees fully filled in as much as anything, we haven't seen any in the last month of so since the locals had their Spring litter. Likely thinking they don't want even young-ish ones near my place and smart thinking on their part for that one.

I put two coyote warning signs up along the trail near me and one was taken down/stolen the first night.....
 

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I put two coyote warning signs up along the trail near me and one was taken down/stolen the first night.....
Coyotes aren’t smart enough to remove the sign, so it was a supporter (joking,of course, but still). Why wouldn’t they want people warned? We have a local website. Most want the coyotes gone but a vocal group want them protected and blame the people.
 

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Discussion Starter · #224 · (Edited)
Coyotes aren’t smart enough to remove the sign, so it was a supporter (joking,of course, but still). Why wouldn’t they want people warned? We have a local website. Most want the coyotes gone but a vocal group want them protected and blame the people.
I just want them to stay wild and stay in the woods not between the houses, not following people on trails and not snatching small pets. None of which I blame them for but yes, they have become far to acclimatized to people and free opportunistic meals.
 

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People feed them either on purpose or by feeding outdoor pets, or just leaving food accessible to them.
Now that you mention it, one thing puzzling in my old neighborhood is that the coyotes do not seem to scavenge trash cans. It would be a pretty target rich environment if they did, but I haven't seen any evidence of it with my own cans or any neighbor's. There may be a few cats that get their pet food outdoors. The rabbit population fluctuates a lot. You'll see a lot of rabbits, then a few weeks later, wonder where all the rabbits went.
 

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Now that you mention it, one thing puzzling in my old neighborhood is that the coyotes do not seem to scavenge trash cans. It would be a pretty target rich environment if they did, but I haven't seen any evidence of it with my own cans or any neighbor's. There may be a few cats that get their pet food outdoors. The rabbit population fluctuates a lot. You'll see a lot of rabbits, then a few weeks later, wonder where all the rabbits went.
We have wild rabbits. Maybe that is their food source. I didn’t think about that. And of course all the small pets they snatch. A lot have been taken the last year. It’s very bad to the point that people with small dogs don’t leave them outside at all, ever. I take mine out on leash at night and I have a big pushbroom nearby in cash I need to fight one off, if I even could.
 

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We hunt coyote in these parts all year long. They have no natural predators left, no real competition for food and the population would explode without management. When we lived in the country, I took around 8 a year. Just the ones that came up around the house. Valor and I come across them occasionally when hiking, particularly in State Parks where hunting is prohibited and wildlife is plentiful, but they don't come close at all. I always carry a firearm just in case but haven't had the need to deal with any other than observation.
 

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The thing about coyotes is that if you kill the "wrong" one within a finite area, it triggers the rest of the females to come into heat, rapidly. So instead of one litter in one calendar year, you can easily get four or five or six or more.

I'm not against the removal of known problem animals. I've had to do it, I'm within my legal rights to do it, and I'm sure it'll happen again at some point. But I've watched coyote population explosions after resident pack dynamic is interrupted.

One of my mentors - big working sheep farm - told me years ago that she is not worried at all about the coyotes that live in the side of her hill, near her flock and her lambs. She said the only reason she will have a problem is if someone kills the female, sending her daughters/sisters all into heat at the same time, and throwing the equilibrium out of balance. Too many mouths to feed = livestock predation.

I have livestock at two properties right now, about ten miles apart. One has resident coyotes, the other has foxes. Hazing, harassment, containment (of pets and livestock), and being aware of predator behavior goes a long way.
 

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The thing about coyotes is that if you kill the "wrong" one within a finite area, it triggers the rest of the females to come into heat, rapidly. So instead of one litter in one calendar year, you can easily get four or five or six or more.
Interesting. The coyote population in my urban neighborhood seems to be stable. They surface from time to time, and gradually get bolder, but I would not say we have had any kind of population explosion. Of course, no one in the neighborhood has hunted them. I would agree they have few natural predators, and none other than man in the part of the world where I live. Farther out west, wolves can and do kill coyotes.
I wonder what the young pups do once they get old enough to be independent? Seek new territory?
 

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The thing about coyotes is that if you kill the "wrong" one within a finite area, it triggers the rest of the females to come into heat, rapidly. So instead of one litter in one calendar year, you can easily get four or five or six or more.

I'm not against the removal of known problem animals. I've had to do it, I'm within my legal rights to do it, and I'm sure it'll happen again at some point. But I've watched coyote population explosions after resident pack dynamic is interrupted.

One of my mentors - big working sheep farm - told me years ago that she is not worried at all about the coyotes that live in the side of her hill, near her flock and her lambs. She said the only reason she will have a problem is if someone kills the female, sending her daughters/sisters all into heat at the same time, and throwing the equilibrium out of balance. Too many mouths to feed = livestock predation.

I have livestock at two properties right now, about ten miles apart. One has resident coyotes, the other has foxes. Hazing, harassment, containment (of pets and livestock), and being aware of predator behavior goes a long way.
Wow. That is great information. Thanks for sharing!
 
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Still no coyote sightings at the new place in the country. As to predators of another sort, though--there is a lot of open pasture, bounded by some hilly woods on another person's land. Good hunting ground for hawks, and I've seen and heard a few. Compared to my now up-for-sale city house, I see almost no songbirds, despite hanging a feeder close to a pond. A lot of what look to be some kind of fly catchers swoop around, but they are fast and nimble. I think the songbirds, and maybe squirrels and chipmunks as well know that the open grassy area is a hawk danger zone.
I'd miss the songbirds. Squirrels and chipmunks have always stolen half my garden produce, and raided my bird feeders,so I wouldn't miss them at all.
 

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We would go to jail for killing a coyote or using a gun. They will remove a coyote if it harms a person if they can isolate the offender. Otherwise they recommend hazing here too. High powered water jets, noise. I haven’t seen any in our yard and I think the scent of the big dogs scares them off.
 

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If you have shrubs or trees near your house try locating the feeder within a few yards of those. The birds feel safer when they can dart in and out.I only feed birds in the winter because all of the seed thieves are not so active then,except deer.
The fly catchers might be swallows.They are really fun to watch. Sometimes there will be literally hundreds of them swooping around together. My guess is some sort of major insect hatch is going on?
 

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Discussion Starter · #234 ·
Interesting. The coyote population in my urban neighborhood seems to be stable. They surface from time to time, and gradually get bolder, but I would not say we have had any kind of population explosion. Of course, no one in the neighborhood has hunted them. I would agree they have few natural predators, and none other than man in the part of the world where I live. Farther out west, wolves can and do kill coyotes.
I wonder what the young pups do once they get old enough to be independent? Seek new territory?
Yes.
Like most other pack animals, when the pack gets too big to feed or the adolescents get too old, they move on out to fill other territories and breed on their own. Our local coyotes were just three that I know of but had 6 pups this Spring....I doubt we'll see 9 of them for too long.

And I can tell your firsthand from countless encounters that they move off to a different area of their territory when my dogs are in the woods.
 
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