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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone!


Well for those not wanting to read a bit more, I'll include my question right below this.


What are the best store bought/natural remedies for a 6 months old GSD mix with grass allergies?

Could be ointment, spray, pill, or shampoo, however I don't want to get her any shots unless need be.

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Story


Well I noticed a couple months back that Olivia (my GSD mix) had some strange red dots near her..ahem... vagina. Now since they weren't getting worse I assumed it was perhaps some kind of bug bites or something of similar nature since she was adopted from a shelter. I don't know how but it completely slipped my mind she had these mystery dots for the last month or two.

I noticed recently that she was itching herself quite a bit, but she had no fleas anywhere. It even got to the point that my stepdad gave me some cash to take her to the vet because she had started itching her ears. Which caused him to fear that she had a ear infection.

So I begun doing a bit of research since the vet wasn't open and I'm pretty happy I did. I originally thought it may be pyoderma due to the red spots and the fact GSD's are the most common breed to get it. However I came to a realization after ordering a product for pyoderma.

So our grass has been very tall these few last months due to winter and it just being kinda cold in general. However I decided that enough was enough and that the grass was to tall to pick up in. After mowing the lawn I noticed she had even more dots and they looked worse, but only after mowing the lawn.

So the conclusion I have come to is that when she goes to pee she lowers herself down so her privates touch the grass. So this is why she only has these spots on her vagina, since this is the only no hair part of her body that touches the grass.

This would also explain why she has been itching her sides and why she was itching her ears (no redness).

She likes to roll around and play in the grass, it basically where she spends 8+ hours a day. She is an indoor dog, but she has a dog door to go in and out as she pleases. We like to joke she would make a great junk yard dog due to her very protective nature and her love for being outdoors: grin2:


Thanks for any help!

-Alyssa and Olivia
 

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I will just kick this up for you. I know they have wipes you can use everytime your dog goes out in grass it will cut down on any reactions. Just wipe her down with wipes every visit into the grass. The shorter the grass the better it would be for her I suppose. Dogs can also have reactions to anything you use to make your grass nice!
 

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I would get some vet wipes that have chlorhexadine -- and a bottle of matching shampoo too. (Keep it away from her eyes, always!)

You can find them on Amazon. Here's an example:
https://www.amazon.com/Sogeval-Douxo-Count-Chlorhexidine-Pads/dp/B00G3D8JL0

Chlorhex wipes and shampoos are usually what vets use and sell in the clinic, but available online for much less money. It's very safe for frequent use. Avoid oatmeal shampoo! Oats are a grass.

Be sure to wipe her feet, including between the toes, as well as her "undercarriage." These wipes not only will remove the allergen, but also the opportunistic microbes that set up camp whenever skin has an allergic reaction (secondary infections are extremely common with allergies -- many allergy dogs end up on a merrygoround of antibiotics due to recurrent staph infections secondary to allergies, and you REALLY want to avoid that).

Grass allergies are somehow worse in Spring. A friend's dog had a few rough years where she would erupt with issues every Spring. She has mostly grown out of the problem. My friend said that keeping her on a limited ingredient food (fish and sweet potato) helped. There are lots of food options for this now -- Wellness, Canidae, Nature's Variety, and others -- but be sure to look for "limited ingredient" on the bag, and no grains at all, or even fractions of grains (as they're grasses).

An antihistimine (like Zyrtec) helps some dogs too -- your vet can talk with you about doseage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I would get some vet wipes that have chlorhexadine -- and a bottle of matching shampoo too. (Keep it away from her eyes, always!)

You can find them on Amazon. Here's an example:
https://www.amazon.com/Sogeval-Douxo-Count-Chlorhexidine-Pads/dp/B00G3D8JL0

Chlorhex wipes and shampoos are usually what vets use and sell in the clinic, but available online for much less money. It's very safe for frequent use. Avoid oatmeal shampoo! Oats are a grass.

Be sure to wipe her feet, including between the toes, as well as her "undercarriage." These wipes not only will remove the allergen, but also the opportunistic microbes that set up camp whenever skin has an allergic reaction (secondary infections are extremely common with allergies -- many allergy dogs end up on a merrygoround of antibiotics due to recurrent staph infections secondary to allergies, and you REALLY want to avoid that).

Grass allergies are somehow worse in Spring. A friend's dog had a few rough years where she would erupt with issues every Spring. She has mostly grown out of the problem. My friend said that keeping her on a limited ingredient food (fish and sweet potato) helped. There are lots of food options for this now -- Wellness, Canidae, Nature's Variety, and others -- but be sure to look for "limited ingredient" on the bag, and no grains at all, or even fractions of grains (as they're grasses).

An antihistimine (like Zyrtec) helps some dogs too -- your vet can talk with you about doseage.

Thanks so much!

I think I will order some of those wipes and shampoo. I'm really glad you mentioned the oatmeal thing as I never ever would have thought of that. I have some berts bees shampoo that is oatmeal based (haven't used yet) and now definitely won't be using on Olivia. Luckily I do have another dog so it won't be wasted.

I'll for sure wipe her down. She does't seem to be bothered on her toes but as a precaution I still will wipe them.

I noticed that she did start itching herself more when spring came in addition, which she hadn't been doing the last few months. I do hope she grows out of it eventually, but if the wipes work well I don't imagine it's a big hassle to do.

I'm currently feeding Olivia "Origin Large Breed Puppy" however I did notice there is alfalfa in there. The food isn't a huge deal though as my mother and I had been thinking about switching to a RAW diet for the summer. So there shouldn't be any grass related items in there unlike kibble.

Mostly switching because my mothers dog will starve himself because he's bored of his food, but I have quite a bit more research to do on that one.

Thank you again for your help. This was extremely useful!

-Alyssa
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I will just kick this up for you. I know they have wipes you can use everytime your dog goes out in grass it will cut down on any reactions. Just wipe her down with wipes every visit into the grass. The shorter the grass the better it would be for her I suppose. Dogs can also have reactions to anything you use to make your grass nice!
(I don't think my previous reply went through so I'm going to write it again just in case)

Thanks so much for boosting this! It means a great deal as this is my first dog so all the help I can get is greatly appreciated!

I think I have decided that wipes are the best option since both you and another user recommended them. I'll do my best to wipe her down as much as I can, however she likes to sneak outside quite a bit.

From now on the grass it going to be staying short because it does seem to help. We don't use anything on our lawn but our neighbors do so it is possible that something got pushed over by the wind.

Thanks so much for your reply!

-Alyssa
 

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All good advice, and another thing you can try- raw honey from local hives. Must be local hives. If the bees are in contact with your local allergens, eating the honey daily can (after time- like a month) really help desensitize. Plus, it is yummy and good for them.
 

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If she had a contact allergy to grass, I would think her paws, nose and rectum would also have sores.
It seems pretty common in dogs this age to get red welts in groin area. Usually after vaccines.
Cleansing wipes as noted, but you could just use a 50/50 solution of raw apple cider vinegar and follow up with coconut oil.


My rescue had little welts when I got her. Not too severe. I applied the coconut oil a hand full of times. Got her on immune enhancing supplement (See Carmen for her products - Feed Sentials and Sunday Sundae probiotic.), ears were a tad troublesome too. Cleaned those with C.O. too.
Cleared right up and despite she was on a variety of drugs from mid july until end of oct.
 

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My golden has a grass allergy. It affects his paws. I rinse with Apple cider vinegar and make sure it's dry. Paw pads need to have no fur(trim if needed). I also got him a nice size area of artificial grass so he can lay outside on that and that is exactly where he lays.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
All good advice, and another thing you can try- raw honey from local hives. Must be local hives. If the bees are in contact with your local allergens, eating the honey daily can (after time- like a month) really help desensitize. Plus, it is yummy and good for them.

How interesting! I didn't realize that dogs could eat honey?

We have lots of local hives around and have quite a few suppliers in the area so getting some honey won't be a problem.

It makes sense to have her desensitized to the allergen, I never would have though of honey through :)

Thanks so much! I'll definitely add this to my list of things to try!

-Alyssa
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
If she had a contact allergy to grass, I would think her paws, nose and rectum would also have sores.
It seems pretty common in dogs this age to get red welts in groin area. Usually after vaccines.
Cleansing wipes as noted, but you could just use a 50/50 solution of raw apple cider vinegar and follow up with coconut oil.


My rescue had little welts when I got her. Not too severe. I applied the coconut oil a hand full of times. Got her on immune enhancing supplement (See Carmen for her products - Feed Sentials and Sunday Sundae probiotic.), ears were a tad troublesome too. Cleaned those with C.O. too.
Cleared right up and despite she was on a variety of drugs from mid july until end of oct.


I've been checking her all over for more of the sores but only her underside seems to have them. I would have thought the sores would be all over to, but they only appear on her underside for some reason.

She did just get her rabies vaccine a month or two ago, but would that still have a reaction if it's been that long?

I will definitely be trying the coconut oil (we have a lot) because she doesn't have severe sores at all (maybe a dozen at present). None of them ever pop they just kinda disappear aside from two or three that seem to stay.

Thanks for the advance! I hope the coconut works (easy fix) but we will see!

Surely one of these methods will help :)

-Alyssa
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
My golden has a grass allergy. It affects his paws. I rinse with Apple cider vinegar and make sure it's dry. Paw pads need to have no fur(trim if needed). I also got him a nice size area of artificial grass so he can lay outside on that and that is exactly where he lays.

She doesn't seem to have a problem with her paws, however I definitely could try this!

I can try the artificial grass if I can't find a solution so thanks so much for that idea!

Thanks again!

-Alyssa
 

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I also give bee pollen to all my dogs

Bee Pollen for Dogs

As they collect nectar from flower blossoms, bees also gather pollen, a high-protein food, to carry back to the hive. While doing so, they spread pollen from flower to flower, fertilizing plants so that they produce berries, fruits, nuts, and vegetables. More than 100 crops grown in the US are pollinated by honeybees.

Bee pollen, which is collected from hives and sold as a health supplement, has long been prized for its proteins, amino acids, vitamins, enzymes, and other nutrients. Approximately half of its protein is made up of free-form amino acids, which require no digestion; they are immediately absorbed and utilized by the body. It is unusually high in the bioflavonoid rutin, which strengthens capillaries, protects against free radical damage and has anti-inflammatory effects.

"Proponents claim that bee pollen improves energy, endurance, and vitality, speeds recovery from illness or injury, helps convalescents gain weight, helps the overweight lose weight, reduces cravings and addictions, fights infectious diseases, boosts immunity, improves intestinal function, increases fertility, and helps prevent cancer.

Bee pollen is also a widely used remedy for hay fever and allergies.1 As with raw honey, which contains small amounts of bee pollen, it is said to be most effective when derived from local hives and taken for several weeks prior to allergy season, then continued through the year."
 
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