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Went over to the place we are getting our puppy from. I cant believe how big they have got since the last time we saw them, they are up and about and pretty active. Only 1 question, at how many weeks can u tell if they will be long hair? thanks

We had to take pics, I am a camera happy man!!


And excuse my hippy hair, it was so windy yesterday, ha.

They are investigating who is outside there house


Me holding one, mama makin sure I am being careful, she is so caring


my wife holding one of the females


Play time!



Here is me with the sire, his name is TinBear, he is really nice dog, HUGE! he is only like 1!



Us leaving, "hey you guys cant leave, I say u have to stay"
 

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Congratulations on your new puppy!!! Is it gonna be a male or a female that you are getting??
My only concern is that the sire or Daddy of the litter is only a year old...
You cannot do their hip xrays until they are at least 2yrs old...I wonder why the breeder already used him as a stud?
 

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What a great looking litter! You two must be super excited!! The parents look very sweet tempered, and they are gorgeous! Have you picked out your puppy yet, or will you wait til the day you pick up?
 

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Look at all the little cuties! We're getting our puppy in July - I could burst with anticipation.
 

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Nice pups, but I totally agree with Superpup. One year of age is way too young for breeding.. that's like a young teenager having a kid! Are there proven hip certifications on the male? OFA will only certify at two years of age minimum. Not to start one of "those" threads, but that's enough concern to make me run away very quickly in the opposite direction. I'd be really worried about things going wrong later on with my precious pup, so I am a firm believer in doing everything correctly right from the start to stack the deck as much as possible in favor of getting a GOOD lifetime companion!

Quote:We kinda picked one out last night, but we will wait a few more weeks and pick one for sure.
That's another thing that worries me. A good breeder almost always picks the pup for the owner because they know the pups better than anyone and can make the best match possible. Even an experienced person can't jump into a litter and pick the best puppy as well as a good breeder! What if you want a quiet one and you pick the quiet pup, only to find out that every time you've visited, the pup just got done with a marathon of playing and happened to be napping or chill, then you get it home only to find out it's a whirling dervish! The breeder will know these things. So yes, they're cute, ALL puppies are cute, but please choose your future family member very carefully!
 

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I would suggest making a post in the breeding section, perhaps under "Choosing a Breeder," and ask about those points. Ask if it is a good idea to breed a 1 y/o dog without hip certifications and ask if it is a good idea to pick a pup without breeder input. We have a lot of very experienced, dedicated breeders and fanciers on this board who may give you interesting responses.

This country has OFA and PennHIP for certifications. They are both different, with Penn certifying very early and OFA certifying at two years of age. Germany A-stamps at 1 year of age for their hip certs. So yes, there is variance on *when* certs are done but it is generally agreed that it is NOT a good idea to breed a dog earlier than full maturity. There are things that surface around 18-24 months of age that may not be present at a year of age, things that may not want to be bred and passed on. The GSD is rife with hip (and elbow) problems, so any breeder that is NOT diligent on at minimum hip certifications should be written off. Of course, parents with good hips can still produce puppies with bad hips (there are lots of genetics involved in hip dysplasia) but it certainly reduces the risk.

As far as picking a puppy willy-nilly, it's very tough to do. You are not there 24/7 but the breeder is. The breeder will see things you may never notice on your visit. Maybe your "star puppy" actually is way too drivey and pushy, something that could overwhelm an owner if they're not prepared. Or maybe your "star puppy" is nice and calm but actually lacks confidence and is more fearful, again not something you would want to deal with.

These are things I'd look for when choosing a breeder:
1) Health certifications and clearances, the more, the merrier!
2) Not breeding immature dogs
3) Titled dogs that tell me that yes, these dogs possess proper temperament and are most likely to produce excellent canine citizens
4) Breeders who can tell me what their program goals are, what the goals are of a particular breeding, and why they put that bitch together with that stud. I want to know all the whys of the mating! Why THAT stud instead of that other one? If they bred out of convenience because they own both sire and dam, that's not a good thing. If they own both sire and dam and bred them together because the pedigrees combine well, that's another story!

Do your homework! A good breeder will support you for the rest of your puppy's life and provide you with an outstanding family companion, one that has been carefully chosen to match your desires, needs, and goals.
 

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Wes, I don't want to burst your bubble, I know you and your wife must be very excited. But I have to agree with Diana, unfortunately this sounds like a back-yard-breeder and I too would be concern with health issues. Also, just because the parents are sweet, doesn't mean they are sound. I have had 2 GSDs that are sweet as can be with people but terrified of their own shadow, both from back-yard-breeders, both with health (one was severely dysplastic by the time she was 10 months old) and temperament issues.
 

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At a minimum, you owe it to yourself to visit other breeders---just so you have something to compare to. ALL puppies are adorable. But this is going to be a very long term commitment for you and your wife. Go into it with a clear head (puppy breath is intoxicating!), some good info (you've got us!), and do some homework. Visit several breeders and you'll start to get a feel for the huge variety that exists in this breed. I bet that within 2 hours drive from you there are half a dozen breeders. And breeders from anywhere in the U.S. will ship a puppy; that's a common thing.

Beware the bargain-priced pup. The cost of the dog is a pittance compared to what you will pay over the dog's lifetime. One vet bill can easily make up the difference between a BYB pup and one from a good breeder.

Obviously, we don't know this breeder or their dogs. They could be awesome. Just do your homework and ask the right questions.

Good luck!
 

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Originally Posted By: Luca_stl
Beware the bargain-priced pup. The cost of the dog is a pittance compared to what you will pay over the dog's lifetime. One vet bill can easily make up the difference between a BYB pup and one from a good breeder.
My back-yard-bred GSD has already cost me well over $2,000 in vet bills. I could have gotten and AWESOME pup from a reputable breeder with that money and less!
 

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Just be forewarned that good breeding cannot guarantee you a healthy pup. No breeder on the face of the earth of any animal can hand you an 8 week old and tell you that this pup will never be sick a day in its life and never have a single issue and will be a perfect pet. These are dogs, not wind-up toys! But going with a good breeder who health-clears and temperament-tests breeding stock with REAL tests (not a herding cert, not a CGC, not a TT but schutzhund, tracking, herding *title,* higher obedience levels, etc) and knows the lineage and knows the good and bad of the pedigrees can stack the odds in your favor and give you the best pup for your money. Also, don't think that a high price tag is an indicator of quality, but be aware that a good GSD puppy is *rarely* less than $800 from any lines. The norm for working lines is $1000-$2000, German showline pups tend to start around $2000. That's just the beginning! This is not a cheap breed. Visit the health section for testament to that.


I guess I'm the bubble-burster here. The reality of the GSD breed is not all sunshine and happiness but if you do your homework, the rewards make the effort and time and money completely worth it. A good GSD will be active without being hyper, very intelligent, biddable, easy to train (if done right), easily motivated, good protective instinct without being overly fearful and defensive, versatile, polite with strangers but very loving and fun with its family and close friends. You shouldn't have to worry about a fearful, aggressive dog, one that is not trustworthy around people and bad with kids. You want a lifetime companion, not a lifetime burden.

If you feel overwhelmed, you can request breeder recommendations in your area, or if you're willing to ship, breeder recommendations in general! In the "Choosing a Breeder" section, post your location, how far you are willing to go, whether you would be willing to ship in a pup, and as many details as possible on what you're looking for in a GSD, what your ideal GSD is, what you plan to do with the pup, what activities you may want to participate in, your experience level, what you DON'T want or what you would not be comfortable with, and anything else you'd feel relevant. A lot of people say they don't want a show or working dog as if to say that they don't care if the parents work or show or do anything, but that is a CRUCIAL part in helping to determine the qualities (or lack thereof) of the litter. Parents that work and show will likely produce puppies with ability and brains to work and the beauty of a good GSD. If Mom was breeder/handler/owner trained in schutzhund and Dad is an urban search and rescue dog with major disaster deployments under his belt (er.. collar?), chances are you will have some very well adjusted, excellent representatives of the breed as opposed to A) Nice dad and B) Mom's good with kids.
 

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Quote: The reality of the GSD breed is not all sunshine and happiness but if you do your homework, the rewards make the effort and time and money completely worth it.
ditto.

Other breed fanciers would probably argue the point, but I think there are other breeds where the back-yard-breeder issue is less of a crap shoot. Some breeds are just easier temperament-wise, or have fewer critical genetic health issues.

The chances of doing okay with a Golden, Daschund, or Beagle, among others, are better, IMO, than with a GSD. The GSD's well-deserved popularity has been its biggest downfall.
 

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Originally Posted By: DianaMI would suggest making a post in the breeding section, perhaps under "Choosing a Breeder," and ask about those points. Ask if it is a good idea to breed a 1 y/o dog without hip certifications and ask if it is a good idea to pick a pup without breeder input. We have a lot of very experienced, dedicated breeders and fanciers on this board who may give you interesting responses.
Wes, I'm not advising against doing this, since it is part of a buyer's "homework" during the search for a breeder. However, I will tell you that you are likely to get some ugly responses. IF people can be civil it CAN be helpful. Some people on this forum have been a little harsh with attacking breeders...a thread that I started by asking people's opinions on a particular breeder had to be closed by the moderator because people were being tasteless with their comments. This was upsetting for me considering I came here to get help and people decided to act in a way that was not helpful at all. Again, you might get some helpful information there. I am just warning you that people may, in fact, "burst your bubble" by responding carelessly.
 

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Of course, few things piss us passionate GSD people off more than breeders producing poor GSDs or generally contributing to its downfall...


Note: GENERAL comment that is NOT directed at any breeder in particular. I have distaste for any breeder of any breed that is only doing the breed a disservice by breeding.
 

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DianaM,

I do understand your (and others') passion for the breed and for its preservation. And I also understand using that passion to direct people to quality breeders. However, there is a tasefull way to do this. And some of the things I have read on the "Choosing A Breeder" forum have been uncalled for. If they weren't, the moderator would not have to close threads. I just think that when a new-comer shows up looking for advice on breeders we could all use a little sensitivity when responding to their posts. After all, the fact that they are a NEW-comer means they simply may not have the knowledge base that others here have. I just wanted to warn Wes that he might get some not-so-kind comments made about the breeder he's looking into so that he isn't caught off guard. Had someone warned me, I probably would not have been so taken aback by it.
 
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