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Hello guys,
In short lines I don’t have experience with dogs but I love them, so I said it’s the right time to have my first dog and I wanted this to be the perfect experience with a perfect dog. I did a lot of researching and market/shelters visiting finally German shepherd was the winner for me. The next step was taking A friend of mine claims to be an expert in dogs so he can choose with me the perfect puppy so we found Alpha that’s her name she was very ferindly with me and playful with other puppies and my friend agreed that she’s a good choice as a breed I paid for her almost 1000$.

- First I don’t trust my friend anymore because I asked him to check her physically and the age so he told me it’s right she’s 4 months when I took her to the vet they’ve said she’s almost 6 months ears up, done with her adult teeth.

- Second, Alphas head is very small to her age, and the nose a bit longer than I see on other GSDs, I regret taking that guy with me for this as well

- Third she don’t like the dry food and don’t like to eat so much I think shes 8 months now and her weight is 48.5lb >> 22kg

- Fourth she have aggression agenst strangers and other dogs specially dogs snipping all the time, I can’t get Her off leash

Please note as more that one veteran said and the blood tests for her she don’t have any health issues

I love her so much, but I want to learn from my mistakes, I’m uploading her pictures I would like to know more about her and your opinion as breeders
 

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She needs to be around well balanced dogs ASAP

You need to learn how to show your girl who's the boss

Put her dry food down and leave it for a couple days and she should eat it but you might want to wait until she gains a little weight first.
 

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You might want to try different foods. Some dog food is junk and not tasty or healthy. For my skinny female, when I

got her I decided she would be on raw or almost raw meat diet. I lightly cooked chicken w/ bones, ground beef,

pork chunks, canned salmon, canned mackerel, canned tuna, canned chicken, chicken gizzards, livers, hearts.

All human grade food from supermarket. Started out just partially cooking everything and then gradually less cooking. Also she gets omega bits and a vitamin/mineral supplement. She has

eaten all of the above when offered. She won't eat dry kibble unless she's starving. She's put on healthy muscle and

she gets good exercise daily.

I agree you need to expose her to nice calm dogs. Maybe look up Obedience classes in your area. You probably need

help from a trainer as this is the age they start forming behavior habits that you don't want.

Welcome to the forum. Your puppy is Beautiful!!
 

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I gave her Taste of the wild all life stages as a dry food, raw food beef, chicken, Tuna, brown rice, vegetables.


You might want to try different foods. Some dog food is junk and not tasty or healthy. For my skinny female, when I

got her I decided she would be on raw or almost raw meat diet. I lightly cooked chicken w/ bones, ground beef,

pork chunks, canned salmon, canned mackerel, canned tuna, canned chicken, chicken gizzards, livers, hearts.

All human grade food from supermarket. Started out just partially cooking everything and then gradually less cooking. Also she gets omega bits and a vitamin/mineral supplement. She has

eaten all of the above when offered. She won't eat dry kibble unless she's starving. She's put on healthy muscle and

she gets good exercise daily.

I agree you need to expose her to nice calm dogs. Maybe look up Obedience classes in your area. You probably need

help from a trainer as this is the age they start forming behavior habits that you don't want.

Welcome to the forum. Your puppy is Beautiful!!
 

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I think she's a nice looking dog. Her muzzle may be longish but she's a female and they do have more refined muzzles.



My picky eater is picky about when she eats. She likes to eat in the evening. And she likes company. My far from picky eater eats anything anywhere alone or with company.


Reactions to people and dogs is often misinterpreted and on top of that often due to the handler... (the old "nothing wrong with the dog but the handler's a mess" - song.)
 

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Don't be too upset with your friend, I think Alpha is a very pretty girl and she is not finished growing yet. She does need to eat though in order for that to happen. Have you found any foods that she does enjoy? Could you sprinkle this onto her food to entice her? You have work to do with her before she should be trusted off-leash. There are tons of helpful posts here on the forum, I hope you stay and read and keep asking questions as those far more knowledgeable will be able to offer advice. Welcome to the forum.
 

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My skinny 2 yr. old doesn't like Taste of the Wild either. When I mention lightly cooked chicken w/ bones, I just put

it in the microwave to heat the exterior for a few minutes. It's not even close to being cooked. but it's how I ease mine into eating raw. If you're trying to put weight on her, adding a 3rd or 4th small meal can help.
 

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Pretty feminine looking dog. Make sure to get a good trainer to help you work with her.
Soaking kibble in hot water for about 15 minutes makes it taste better. I think it is also easier to digest when it is completely soaked. A warm soft meal must feel better in their stomachs compared to cold hard marbles that will take hours to expand in their stomach.
 

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How we raised and trained our 1st German Shepherd-

We raised her on Purina 1 Large breed puppy, it has chicken number one ingredient and all the solid nutritional science of the purina feed company behind it. Does not cost an arm and a leg either. We put about a tablespoon of chicken and rice canned food in her pan with a little water and mash it with a fork to make a gravy, then mix in the dry food. Inga (that her name) loves it and devours it. She is in spendid health with a shiney coat. Now she eats Purina 1 Large Breed Adult.

Your girl looks like American Showline to me with that long straight nose.

For training- we knew nothing at all about training German Shepherds and now at 2 years of age Inga knows over 30 commands and is a working ranch dog. We trained her ourselves by using the training DVDs of Don Sullivan. You can google him. You have to do the work of course. The nice thing is he also addresses every problem and you can go back and look at that part again. welcom to the forum.
 

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Don't worry about the head. She has a nice, feminine head. Her muzzle may be a wee bit longer than the breed standard would prefer, but she's not done growing yet! I think she's very pretty!

- Fourth she have aggression against strangers and other dogs specially dogs snipping all the time, I can’t get Her off leash

This is a training issue. You need help - the most important thing that happens in training class is the owner learns HOW to train the dog! The longer you let this go on, the harder it is going to be to fix! She is 6 months now, and getting big and strong - don't delay! As dogs hit adolescence around 7 to 10 months, they go through a 'teenage' stage where they sometimes seem to forget all their manners, so get on top of this NOW!

Find yourself a trainer who is used to training large, strong-willed dogs, not just lap dogs. PetSmart is not the place to go to get training for a dog like this. If you tell us where you live, board members may be able to suggest a good trainer.

When you say 'snipping' do you mean 'nipping'?
 

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I think this is your key concern
"Fourth she have aggression agenst strangers and other dogs specially dogs snipping all the time, I can’t get Her off leash "

I see a dog that appears to be anxious , can't relax --- I see tension --

you need to calmly train her - help her to adapt to changing situations and people unknown
to her - but who are not going to be interacting with her .
they are to be neutral .

she may have had a sheltered experience up until the time you took her in.

very shallow bodied -- can't do anything about that -- you have to accept her for what she is
and help her to be the best to her potential.
 

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Reactions to people and dogs is often misinterpreted and on top of that often due to the handler... (the old "nothing wrong with the dog but the handler's a mess" - song.)
This is proven many times over in my experience working with rescues. What many described as "aggression" are often due to other things that are easily correctable as part of training. Getting a good dog trainer, as suggested already, will be the best route before this becomes a real issue, which it can if the dog continues down this path without understanding why and get mishandled.

Last dog I saw, dog goes berserk around other dogs so owner thought dog may be aggressive. I see, instead, a highly aroused dog acting out of frustration. I got the dog, within a few days, this dog became the most dog friendly dog ever, loves other dogs, behaves excellent around all kinds of dogs including the little shy puppies, total social butterfly. But hand the leash back to the owner, dog starts lunging again. In summary - a good trainer will save you needless frustration and help you assess the best way to help this dog. No one can help you here like a great trainer in front of you.
 

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As already stated, exercise and training are key for you and your dog. Purina is not the best, but not the worse. Hot water and soaking is great advice. You have a good looking German Shepherd, work with her and more importantly, enjoy her.
 

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For food you can try 4 health at tractor supply. Decent food at a fair price. You can add some canned to the kibble for variety and taste.
To be redundant, find a good trainer / mentor to help with the pup. She is adorable and young. Teach her to work with you as a team. When you see strangers or dogs don't get anxious yourself. Watch your breathing and watch her breathing. Turn her away from trouble BEFORE it starts because once the jumping and lunging begins it is hard to stop. Showing her a treat won't work. If barking / lunging/ the Hard Stare start, I tend to walk into my dog gently and push her around in a circle away from what she is barking at. Eventually, when she looks at me, I praise her and we move away. That is just one technique. Having someone who knows about GSDs watch you is a huge help. They will find small mistakes that can make a big difference in how you communicate with your pup.
 

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Here's how I begin training with a puppy, or with any dog that has never learned to ignore other dogs.

Start at home, with a supply of treats. I say to the dog "Watch!" and hold the treat up near my face, as I want the dog to focus on me, NOT the treat. When I get that focus, I say "YES!"and immediately give the dog the treat. You can also use a clicker as a marker, but my personal preference is to use my voice. I can't accidentally leave that at home when I take the dog for a walk, and barring a really bad case of laryngitis, I can't lose it, either!

When the dog has this down pat (I'd do it for several days at LEAST.) get it to sit by your left side, and repeat.

Once it has mastered that, try taking a step forward, while the dog maintains its focus on you. Again, mark the correct behavious with a 'yes!' and a treat.

Gradually increase the number of steps. You can also start teaching the dog the word 'heel' to go with this behaviour.

When the dog is doing well indoors, move outside, but stay in an area that is free of distractions. I used to heel up and down the driveway with my puppy when she was at this stage. Of course, if the dog starts jumping up on you, pawing, or chewing the leash, DO NOT reward it, and tell it 'NO'!

Gradually move to an area where there are more and more distractions. And as Car2ner said, it is VERY important to catch the dog BEFORE it starts to lunge at another dog, person or squirrel. Watch the dog's body language carefully, and catch it the moment it starts to focus on something other than you. Call its attention back to you with the 'watch' command. Lunging is ALWAYS preceded by intense staring at the distraction.
 
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