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Hello,

We have a 2 year old German Shepherd, and at about the age of 1, she began to shed a lot. We did not notice it at first, but after a while it seemed like all we were doing was sweeping up copious amounts of dog hair. Finally, it was clear that there was a problem. She has all but lost of her hair. First, we changed foods to eliminate corn and chicken, with no change. She got fixed and had a blood panel taken, and all was normal. She was tested for some type of dermal mites and was negative. There was an endocrine lab panel taken and all was normal. The vet has no further ideas and additional opinions have made allergy testing seem like a waste. They don't believe it to be allegeries due to the global scale of the hair loss. The first picture is her healthy coat and the next two are her currently. If any one has any ideas or previous experiences, we would greatly appreciate it.

Thank you,

Tyler
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Thyroid fumction been checked specifically ? Im not sure if that would be a normal part of the endocrine lab panel you had done or not. Cushings can also cause skin/hair issues, but again, not sure it that's been covered. Sorry about your girl.
 

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must be heart breaking and frustrating to see your girl this way, especially so young, and not have any solid leads as to what’s causing it.

my only thought is an autoimmune disease...

but i really just wanted to reach out to say that you’re in my thoughts and she’s a beautiful girl regardless.
 

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Thyroid fumction been checked specifically ? Im not sure if that would be a normal part of the endocrine lab panel you had done or not. Cushings can also cause skin/hair issues, but again, not sure it that's been covered. Sorry about your girl.
They said her thyroid was on the lower end of the spectrum, but it was normal and "nothing to worry about." Another vet told us to try thyroid medication anyways, so we may end up doing that.
 

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must be heart breaking and frustrating to see your girl this way, especially so young, and not have any solid leads as to what’s causing it.

my only thought is an autoimmune disease...

but i really just wanted to reach out to say that you’re in my thoughts and she’s a beautiful girl regardless.
Thank you for the kind words. She is happy as can be, but it is sad to see her this way.
 

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They said her thyroid was on the lower end of the spectrum, but it was normal and "nothing to worry about." Another vet told us to try thyroid medication anyways, so we may end up doing that.
I would consider trying the thyroid meds -- the general reference numbers are "all breed" and by the time you see a low-normal it's usually time to intervene. There's a more specific full thyroid panel that can be run through Hemopet or U-Mich (or Mich State -- I can't remember) to get breed specific reference values and better information on the thyroid function. (It just requires your vet Fed Ex'ing blood to one of the two labs that run the full thyroid panel and paying another $150 or so.)

I don't think you can rule out autoimmune issues yet either. They can be pretty tough to diagnose sometimes.
 
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