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Vet just called and said puppy sample had tested positive for Giardia. I have to pick up Paracure (sp.) at the clinic. Anyone have any idea on what this costs and how effective? I have problems with my Vet's fees and won't mind picking it up elsewhere.
 

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Originally Posted By: Jax08no idea on cost but you should probably have your drinking / tap water tested.
Unfortunately I have caught Fritz numerous times eating poop and he has drank water from many of the lakes and ponds around my house.
 

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when my cat was having problems and they tested for giardia she told me if it was positive I should get my water tested to make sure. it's not an expensive test and will rule out problems for your kids even though it's probably not an issue.
 

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Panacure comes in a powder form and is around $20 depending on where you are located (here in California EVERYTHING seems more pricey at the vets). You can get it likely cheaper from online medicine retailers (i.e. 1800pet meds) but that will take longer to get, of course.

It is very effective but I recommend getting the test repeated about 2 weeks after you finish the regimin. We failed to do this and she needed a longer dose than we originally got (had it really bad) and we ended up having to retreat a couple of times before they told us to retest to be sure it was gone.

It can easily be spread back to the dog (or humans) so you want to be sure to wash your hands thoroughly and clean up the poop ASAP. We ended up treating our yard (due to severity) with a bleach/water solution (I forget the ratio, because it was a couple of years ago).

It can cause lots of problems if it doesn't get treated properly. My dog had lots of digestive issues after having it for about 4-55 months in total. Again, Siena had it very severly and came to us from the Breeder's kennel with it (very prevalent in the Sierra Mountain range)
 

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Originally Posted By: lrodptl
Originally Posted By: Jax08no idea on cost but you should probably have your drinking / tap water tested.
Unfortunately I have caught Fritz numerous times eating poop and he has drank water from many of the lakes and ponds around my house.
Siena ate her own poop (and others) for a while too. We try really hard not to let her drink out of lakes/ponds, but she's a dog so it can be hard. There is a vaccine which we initially did, but then realized having it so long (hopefully) increased her immunity, so we did not do a second one. So far, so good (knock on wood)
 

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Giardia is best treated with Panacur. You can buy a 125ml 10% solution at Tractor Supply for around $18.00. Panacur liquid is not labled for dogs but the 10% solution is sold as Safe-Guard Goat Wormer and is the exact same thing. I would treat at 1ml per 5 pounds for 3 to 5 days. Panacur is very safe with little to no side effects. i would treat for 5 days then retest your pup in 2 weeks. Sometimes Giardia is very difficult to get rid of.
 

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Originally Posted By: DocGiardia is best treated with Panacur. You can buy a 125ml 10% solution at Tractor Supply for around $18.00. Panacur liquid is not labled for dogs but the 10% solution is sold as Safe-Guard Goat Wormer and is the exact same thing. I would treat at 1ml per 5 pounds for 3 to 5 days. Panacur is very safe with little to no side effects. i would treat for 5 days then retest your pup in 2 weeks. Sometimes Giardia is very difficult to get rid of.
Just what I was thinking
 

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Panacur = Fenbendazole = Safe-Guard
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fenbendazole
It's also effective against most common canine intestinal worms.

The downside is that it is a mutagen (it can cause DNA mutations).


I like it be because it is cheap (if bought in bulk) and because it works against several different types of common parasites and because it can be bought without a prescription or a veterinary visit.

The reason it is recommended to treat again a second time two to four weeks later is that this drug doesn't necessarily kill all parasites in all life stages. (So if you only treat for one 3-day session; you may kill all the adult parasites but the eggs may survive)

If you store it for long periods of time in liquid form it should be refrigerated. Follow the directions.

If you have a lot of dogs or are affiliated with a rescue or if your dogs have repeated infestations of Giardia or intestinal parasites it might be a good drug for your dogs. Because it is a mutagen I would be reluctant to use it on puppies or a potential breeder unless there is no other practical means to fight an infestation.

The version I buy is for cattle, I dispense it (measure it) with the syringe. It takes about 2 cc (for an adult GSD) per day for three days on food (then repeat once for another three-day session about 2 to 4 weeks later).


IIRC this $120 bottle is enough to treat 11 adult GSD (2; 3-day sessions) (using the Panacur in packets of three x 2 it would cost about $28 for one adult GSD; and about $308 to treat 11 GSDs)
http://www.lambertvetsupply.com/SafeGuard-Suspension-10-1000-ml-Bottle--pr--0160071000

This is where I got the idea.

Inexpensive canine treatment for Giardia and most common canine intestinal worms.
http://www.beaglesunlimited.com/beaglehealth_canineintestinalworms.htm
 

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It's easier just to order the Metronidazole aka flagyl. 250mg bottle is more cost effective to purchase than the fenbendazole. I've had both (granted the safe guard is more a broader dewormer) but the pills are easier to administer. If you look at the website above (which is good info), see the page for giardia and not just deworming.

beagle health tab, you'll see giardiasis.
 

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Originally Posted By: Angela_W... Metronidazole aka flagyl. 250mg bottle is more cost effective to purchase than the fenbendazole.
Metronidazole is simpler to use. However I would debate that it is not necessarily as cost-effective; because it requires a prescription. Unless you have a vet essentially in your pocket because he's already had his hands in your pockets and you just can call him up and ask him to write you a prescription. Typically a prescription requires an office visit, and office bill, gas, time off from work and plus the cost of the medication. For what it would cost for some people; to take one dog to the vet to get a prescription to treat one dog for Giardia or common intestinal worms; they could just order a 1000 mL bottle of safeguard that could treat 11 adult GSDs.

A vet can give you valuable guidance. However if you're poor and you know what the problem is and a good nurse; sometimes it's better to treat it yourself.
 

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and wash your hands!

People can get it and it's not pretty.
 

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Originally Posted By: Angela_WIt's easier just to order the Metronidazole aka flagyl. 250mg bottle is more cost effective to purchase than the fenbendazole. I've had both (granted the safe guard is more a broader dewormer) but the pills are easier to administer. If you look at the website above (which is good info), see the page for giardia and not just deworming.

beagle health tab, you'll see giardiasis.
My experience is that Metronidazole/Flagyl is not as effective. That was our first line of defense and it did not work on Siena, only the Panacur. Plus I hate the neurological side effects (and it also caused diarrhea for her).
 

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Originally Posted By: DogGone(using the Panacur in packets of three x 2 it would cost about $28 for one adult GSD; and about $308 to treat 11 GSDs)
I made a mistake when I ran those numbers. That's only for one 3-day treatment; it's a good idea to give a second three day treatment within two to four weeks to try to make sure that all the parasites life stages are killed and eliminated from the body. So that would double the costs of using the packets.
(using the Panacur in packets of three x 2 it would cost about $56 for one adult GSD; and about $612 to treat 11 GSDs)

As opposed to using the bulk cattle version: IIRC this $120 bottle is enough to treat about 11 adult GSD (2; 3-day sessions)

Originally Posted By: Jax08http://www.valleyvet.com/ct_detail.html?pgguid=a981a331-83e0-42f5-bf86-0a5b069cc1f0

Free Shipping and it's all set for dogs!
The packets are much easier to use.

Originally Posted By: zypand wash your hands!

People can get it and it's not pretty.
Some of the parasites can be transferred by a dog licking your face or less commonly skin near a wound. Less commonly some parasites can be picked up by walking on contaminated ground particularly if you don't have socks or shoes on .

It's important that everyone picks up after their dogs because that's part of the way it spreads. That's one of the reasons that you should pick up after your own dog and that if you go to a dog Park that everyone should police each other and make sure that everyone picks up after their dogs.

It's also a good idea if your dog has an extreme or severe intestinal worm infestation to spray your yard (the area where your dogs defecate) with an insecticide to keep from reinfecting your dog.

Practice good hygiene. Change your dogs water daily, and sterilize the bowls daily during an outbreak. Even when the dog is healthy I try to sterilize the water and feeding bowls anywhere from once a week to once a month.

Originally Posted By: Jax08you should probably have your drinking / tap water tested.
If the tap water was contaminated odds are humans would be infected also and more severely. I suspect treated city tap water for the should be free of Giardia. If the tap water is untreated well water, then it would be a very good idea to have it tested.
 

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I prefer using metronidazole, and have better luck than with panacur actually. You don't need a prescription, just order it from veterinary or farm supply stores. Its also marketed for other species such as under the name fish-zole but its pure metronidazole so you just have to get the dosage for the weight of your dogs.
 

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Originally Posted By: LinI prefer using metronidazole, and have better luck than with panacur actually. You don't need a prescription, just order it from veterinary or farm supply stores. Its also marketed for other species such as under the name fish-zole but its pure metronidazole so you just have to get the dosage for the weight of your dogs.
Are you trying to say that in the US you can get metronidazole for livestock without a prescription?

Metronidazole is an antibiotic and antiprotozoal medication used to treat various conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, nonspecific diarrheal disorders, infections caused by Giardia (a cause of diarrhea), and periodontal disease. Metronidazole requires a prescription from your veterinarian, and is sold by the tablet.
http://www.1800petmeds.com/Metronidazole-prod10098.html

Sure perhaps it's available without a prescription such as for a aquarium use, but I think that might be skirting the law; especially if the intent is to use on dogs.
 

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Originally Posted By: DogGoneLin
Are you trying to say that in the US you can get metronidazole for livestock without a prescription?
Yes. You can also get many other antibiotics and medications without a prescription. I would never recommend doing this without knowing what you are doing. My vet fully knows what I am doing, what meds I have on hand etc. I've discussed it before with her, and she works with me on the many dogs and cats I've fostered. My friends always call me before or on their way to the vet to discuss problems. When self treating you also need to know when to go to the vet, such as if the treatment is not working. You also have to be very careful and know the dosages and length of time for medications especially antibiotics due to the huge problems of antibiotic resistance. If you don't use the correct antibiotic, or not long enough duration of treatment, you can cause resistant bacteria in both the strain you are treating or other bacteria present in the dogs system.
 
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